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Eggs


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9 replies to this topic

#1 GwenO

 
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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:11 AM

So my daughter was diagnosed last summer. Been a long haul getting her well, she is very small "failure to thrive". Anyway, she always ate eggs before she became ill. I've been encouraging them, because they have protein etc. However, she's now telling me that every time she has eggs her stomach really hurts. I realize, of course, that eggs are gluten free, but I'm wondering is egg sensitivity a common thing? I should add that it seems fine if they're in something, i.e., muffins, but they cause problems on their own.
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#2 nvsmom

 
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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:22 AM

Eggs are a problem for many people. Up here in Canada, we have labelling laws where processed foods must list any of the tope allergens/intolerannts on their nutrition label, and egg is one of them (along with soy, milk, peanutes, tree nuts, wheat, mustard, and (I think) rice).

It does seem a bit funny that she says her tummy hurts only when eggs are eaten alone... Is she not an egg fan? I didn't like eggs much as a kid. I've had times where my kids claim their tummies hurt if they don't want to eat something, and this was after going gluten-free when they knew that if something (gluten) causes pain then they don't have to eat it. LOL Sneaky little boys... :rolleyes:
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#3 Lisa

 
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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:37 AM

Some people here have issues with eggs by themselves, yet have no problem with them when used in an ingredient. :huh:
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#4 Minette

 
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Posted 08 February 2013 - 08:40 AM

My DD is not allergic to eggs and they don't bother her stomach, but her immunologist just told us to take her off eggs at least for a few months to give her immune system a rest and help her gut to heal. She is very relieved because I had been making her eat eggs (again, for the protein) but she really doesn't like them.
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#5 GwenO

 
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Posted 08 February 2013 - 10:42 AM

Thanks everyone. She's always liked them in the past, but her gut is so damaged I guess I'm not really surprised she's having trouble. I had to switch her to almond milk as well because cows milk upset her - although cheese and yogurt are fine. Maybe I'll just back off on the eggs. A shame, they're such an easy food.
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#6 pricklypear1971

 
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Posted 08 February 2013 - 01:07 PM

Thanks everyone. She's always liked them in the past, but her gut is so damaged I guess I'm not really surprised she's having trouble. I had to switch her to almond milk as well because cows milk upset her - although cheese and yogurt are fine. Maybe I'll just back off on the eggs. A shame, they're such an easy food.


My son cycles through foods. He'll want one thing for breakfast for a few months then inexplicably refuse it and demand something else. Right now he wants pancakes....with sausage.

He previously wanted an egg omelet, plain.

Before that was Chex. He'd still take the Chex but I won't give it to him, which is part of the egg problem, I'm sure :).

And he has used the "my belly hurts" excuse. But what can you do but trust what they say?
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#7 GwenO

 
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Posted 11 February 2013 - 01:01 PM

That's a good point because my daughter is exactly the same way - she'll have the same thing for weeks - and then all of a sudden change!
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#8 Takala

 
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Posted 11 February 2013 - 08:05 PM

It could be the fat in the egg yolks is a bit much for her right now. Can you try just using the egg whites, and see what happens, or just using the egg whites in cooking other ingredients? This is as long as she is not having an allergic reaction symptom, like rash, itching, swelling, hives, difficulty breathing, etc. I am one of those people who had a bit of a time with plain eggs for a little while, curiously they sort of sat heavy, but never had any problems when they're used in a recipe. So "used in a recipe" they were. You may also want to try organic eggs. They will be on unmedicated feed. I have no idea if they make a difference, but I know from my dairy experiments organic vs. non organic can be felt by me enough that I suspect regular cows get a lot of bad things :(. Nothing like eating a piece of cheap name brand cheese and starting to itch an hour later as if one had consumed a known allergen :angry: which feels very distinct. I cannot believe what is on the labels of some of that stuff.

If you do have to take eggs out all the way, try soaking chia seeds in regular temperature tap water to make a "chia egg" gel. Not only is this fun to do, about a teaspoon or so of seeds can turn into enough "gel" to replace an egg in a recipe. It can also replace gums with some gluten free flours, and they have some nutrition value.
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#9 sora

 
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Posted 12 February 2013 - 07:54 AM

I can only eat eggs if the yolk is completely cooked. If I do eat one with the yolk not cooked I get bloat, gas and sometimes cramps.
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Ah, but I was so much older then, Im younger than that now.


#10 GwenO

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 12:38 PM

Interesting about the yolks. Never thought about that. Chia seeds - I had no idea!
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