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Really? Is There New Info?
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So I get my invite to the Chicago Celiac Center's celiac convention. One of the topics is "Silent and Latent Celiacs: To treat or not to treat" Really? Is there any new info? I have kept my silent celiac child on gluten-free to the point of ocd obsession! I thought it was just standard knowledge in the celiac world that you treat silent celiacs...period. At least it is on this board. :D I did just read an article where a study said celiacs die at a normal rate like other people. (After reading another article that said the opposite) So maybe they are deciding something different?

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Will be interesting to find out. My GI in the UK told me there are ethical questions about treating people with no symptoms. I would think there are ethical issues if we know they may have silent celiac and don't suggest treatment.

Interested to know what others know about this, thanks for raising it.

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Ermh... aren't most cancers initially silent too? :wacko:

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Um...I was diagnosed with silent celiac. I was stunned. My villi were completely flattened so I believe I've had it for ages. Nearly two years after my diagnosis, I accidentally ingested gluten and had a severe reaction for the very first time. This happened about a month ago. My doctor treats me as he treats his other celiac patients. I continue to get regular bloodwork, etc. done. Just because I did not have (obvious at the time) symptoms did not make it different. The damage was still being done. In fact, it is absolutely crucial that those with silent celiac get treatment. All celiacs should be monitored closely and regularly.

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Wow. :ph34r: I guess the self - described finest medical researchers in the world just don't care if one suddenly dies, as long as there is no diarrhea involved ?

They sure like to push this myth that a gluten free diet is impossible for mere mortals. They almost sound like gluten opioid drug addicts, I am beginning to understand why the "Wheat Belly" author keeps digging at the University of Chicago head of pedi gastro.

I did just read an article where a study said celiacs die at a normal rate like other people.

Only if they are TREATED and sticking to a strict gluten free diet AND have experienced gut healing. Otherwise, eventually, because of leaky gut, and the antibodies reacting to the stray proteins, the auto immune reaction attacks the endocrine system (glands) and then the various side effect of the hormones being messed up causes other disease. If the slow starvation and lack of vitamins and minerals going to the proper places doesn't get you first.

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My recollection is that this article from Sweden was based on those with refractory sprue (not sure how long they had to have had damage to be termed 'refractory') and there seemed to be a very high percentage so classified. I would want to see some replicated studies.

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You can read the whole article called "Mortality Rates for Celiacs with Persistent Villous Atrophy Similar to those with Healthy Guts". It is on the Publications and Publicity board...page 2. I don't know how you tell the difference between refractory sprue and someone who just doesn't stick to the diet. Both would have villious atrophy. Nevertheless, I am keeping my silent celiac child on gluten-free until something cures it. My dh is type 1 diabetic and the doctors are hoping in some small way this may prevent it from triggering in her. Plus the whole infertility thing....just playing it safe and keeping her gluten-free.

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My Dr diagnosed me with "Latent Celiac" and I had thought it was something she just made up on the spot to pacify me because I wasn't letting it go. Basically, my blood work came back negative because of my deficient IGA, and my biopsy showed nothing that proved Celiac, but there was inflammation that she could also connect to the ulcers I had, but the ulcers could have been a symptom of Celiac Disease. We had already done the whole challenge thing and I was found to feel better off Gluten...so she said that I did have Celiac Disease, but we caught it early on, before much damage had been done, that it was Latent. And the only treatment was a gluten free diet, which she said I needed to start immediately before damage was done, and that I was lucky.

So I don't care what any one says...treat it. ASAP. I have been flip floppy on these boards, I know. I have been in denial, I know. But I understand now. I haven't intentionally had gluten in a while. And I have never felt so good.

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The more I read and learn about the benefits of anyone keeping clear of gluten, the more sure I am that as someone with Celiac Disease, I need to keep far from it. I work with children with Autism and all the kids in my class are gluten and dairy free. It just screams to me that something is WRONG with our food, when it benefits us, people with autism, diabetics and so on, to stay clear of it.

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So I get my invite to the Chicago Celiac Center's celiac convention. One of the topics is "Silent and Latent Celiacs: To treat or not to treat" Really? Is there any new info? I have kept my silent celiac child on gluten-free to the point of ocd obsession! I thought it was just standard knowledge in the celiac world that you treat silent celiacs...period. At least it is on this board. :D I did just read an article where a study said celiacs die at a normal rate like other people. (After reading another article that said the opposite) So maybe they are deciding something different?

Ski Lisa and I are going. We will try to bring back the info if our heads don't explode!

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The silent celiac should absolutely stay gluten free. The atypical patient is becoming the typical. Just because one is not having the classical symptoms does not mean that damage is not being done.

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You can read the whole article called "Mortality Rates for Celiacs with Persistent Villous Atrophy Similar to those with Healthy Guts". It is on the Publications and Publicity board...page 2. I don't know how you tell the difference between refractory sprue and someone who just doesn't stick to the diet. Both would have villious atrophy. Nevertheless, I am keeping my silent celiac child on gluten-free until something cures it. My dh is type 1 diabetic and the doctors are hoping in some small way this may prevent it from triggering in her. Plus the whole infertility thing....just playing it safe and keeping her gluten-free.

Is the death rate the only thing to think about??? What about quality of life????
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Is the death rate the only thing to think about??? What about quality of life????

She will tell you her quality of life was better before. Of course, she has no intestinal symtoms and could eat a loaf of bread with no symptoms. So she would revert back to not taking her own food to sleepovers and potlucks. She'd love to be able to eat anything off the menu at any restaurant. She has broken into tears at the sight of Krispy Kreams. But she is 12 and that's just a tough age to be different anyway. So if I was to go on quality of life.....I'd let her eat gluten. But she really does good. She had the donut meltdown within the first 2 months. It's been a year now and she is doing great. I did have her GI appointment this week. I asked her about that topic at the conference. She said nothing has changed and you treat silent celiacs. She said, "they have to come up with topics to get you there." She said every year she has to go to a pediatric GI conference but there is hardly ever anything new.

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She will tell you her quality of life was better before. Of course, she has no intestinal symtoms and could eat a loaf of bread with no symptoms. So she would revert back to not taking her own food to sleepovers and potlucks. She'd love to be able to eat anything off the menu at any restaurant. She has broken into tears at the sight of Krispy Kreams. But she is 12 and that's just a tough age to be different anyway. So if I was to go on quality of life.....I'd let her eat gluten. But she really does good. She had the donut meltdown within the first 2 months. It's been a year now and she is doing great. I did have her GI appointment this week. I asked her about that topic at the conference. She said nothing has changed and you treat silent celiacs. She said, "they have to come up with topics to get you there." She said every year she has to go to a pediatric GI conference but there is hardly ever anything new.

But that is only the short term.  I would be thinking growth, fertility etc.

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I was diagnosed 5/21/12.  I have silent celiac and I think I was diagnosed at the point during which I was becoming very ill.  I was having dizzy spells every day so my PCP had me go to a neurologist who diagnosed me.  Along with the dizziness I noticed that I could not go very long without water.  If I was walking around I would start to feel bad after a while, I felt like I was going to faint, and I felt clammy.  I don't know if this was because of low vitamin D or low B12.  I do know that these episodes disapeared after going gluten-free and taking supplements. 

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    • Thanks, I'll check that out. I may have to apply for my own Medicare card in order to get any kind of coeliac-testing done beyond the screen (see above post.)  No, nobody has even mentioned it. I'm unsure if my doctor knows that I do not need to use my hands to vomit, or if she knows about the involuntary vomiting.  I have a part time job at McDonald's and make around $150 per week, which is how I afford to smoke. Mostly, I spend my money on (generally gluten-containing) binge food and cigarettes. I did attempt to start saving money, but then my shifts were cut at work - which meant I had more time to study, but no money, which was kind of pointless. It's complicated. Here in Australia, cigarettes are $25 per pack. These aren't fancy cigarettes either, just your run-of-the-mill Marlboro 20s. Thanks for caring. I am trying to stop I've had the vomiting thing all my life, way before I started smoking. And no, I'm not sure. I know he had an endoscopy and the flattened villi, but I'm not sure if he got a blood test - I assume he would have done, don;t know if it was the full panel. Supposedly he has this FODMAP thing, which I'll admit that I know next to nothing about. Interestingly, people who have to follow low-FODMAP or no-FODMAP diets can't eat gluten either, so there's that. 
    • Would a coeliac screen be the same as a test for antibodies, then? I have no idea why it was even included in my list of tests. It could be my brother, or my symptoms, or both - regardless, I can't say I know too much about the testing.  It's possible that my brother has coeliac disease, I really do worry about it sometimes. He was told to follow a strict low-FODMAP diet by his doctor, and eventually my parents stopped caring. Occasionally they will remind him not to eat things like pasta, greasy foods, etc. because of his condition, but by and large they don't care. He basically just eats whatever he wants. I'm not sure if it affects him or not. However, he isn't shorter than other family members - my dad is 183cm, and my brother is 178cm at the age of 14. Our mother is 173cm.  I do think I have bad digestion, yes. I get gassy and very bloated often, as well as constipated phases (and then following that, diarrhea phases.)  I have tried to ask my mum to call the doctor to get the tests done, but I'm hesitant to mention anything to do with gluten as I know they won't believe me, solely because a good friend of mine has celiac disease. I know they'll think I'm doing it for attention, or to be trendy, when in actual fact I'm just tired of being sick and having no explanation for it other than diet. I'm positive it's not dairy, as I was vegan for a couple of months at one stage. When I went back to eating animal products, I had no issues whatsoever. 
    • He had the IgG ELISA done as well as other blood panels, fecal and saliva tests. He is on an elimination diet right now where foods that score above 0.2 are eliminated for 2-6 months depending on the score, then added back slowly after the detox period.  I am aware that there is a lot of controversy over the IgG, and I'm not here to go into that issue, but I can say with certainty that eliminating the additional foods he reacted to has seen a huge reduction in the symptoms that persisted after cutting gluten and dairy. We will be attempting to add rice back in around October, and see how he does but until then I still need a solution for a baking mix.  I tried to wing it a bit with pumpkin bread today and my attempt was okay but not great. The loaf sank a bit and was overly chewy.  So, to my original question....recipes?
    • Ask the doctor's office!  But usually you can eat right after if you feel like it.  But ask them!  Some of them will try to give you crackers, so you may want to bring some gluten-free applesauce or Rice Chex
    • I'm wondering if he doesn't have an oat problem. He was only dx'd several months ago and really shouldn't use oats for a year after dx. Just thinking out loud. I too am wondering how the rice was picked out of all those other flours to be determined to be affecting him.
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