Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Photo
- - - - -

"naturally Gluten Free"


  • Please log in to reply
4 replies to this topic

#1 Razzle Dazzle Brazell

Razzle Dazzle Brazell

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts

Posted 12 February 2013 - 11:54 AM

Am I the only one who sees this and says, "Haha Just another way of trying to deceive and poison us by avoiding saying this product is gluten free". Am i wrong? It just smells fishy to me. Seems to me that they say this so they do not have to make sure that the particular product is not contaminated according to regulations.

What I am asking is, "Should we not be wary of eating this food because the fact that it does not require gluten to be made is irrelevent to whether it is contaminated."
  • 0
Gluten and Oat Free 6/'12
Dairy, Corn and Yeast free 7/'12
Nightshade Free, Candida diet & low salicylates 8/'12
Nightshades and carbs and sugars limitedly reintroduced, most salicylates now tolerated 9/'12
No longer Reacting to yeasty breads 10/'12
Test confirmed yeast overgrowth, back on Candida diet 11/'12

You only get one life so make it count.

Celiac.com Sponsor:

#2 kareng

kareng

    Dispeller of Shady

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,004 posts

Posted 12 February 2013 - 12:00 PM

Many things are gluten free. Grapes are naturally gluten free. Would be silly for the grape company to pay for gluten testing and add the cost on for everyone.

What I'm trying to point out is, some companies are not going to pay for testing that will add to the cost for everyone. Because they haven't tested, the lawyers advise them not to say just " gluten free". They have no gluten ingredients and no reason to think there is gluten, so they might say " naturally gluten free".

I'm just speaking about what i jave seen in the US. We have no rules about gluten-free labeling here.
  • 0

"You have problems.  There are not enough paper clips, and then you've got world hunger.  Your problems are somewhere in between." -DPR,III

 

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator
 

LTES

 

purring-kitty-smiley-emoticon.gif

 


#3 Razzle Dazzle Brazell

Razzle Dazzle Brazell

    Advanced Community Member

  • Advanced Members
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 399 posts

Posted 12 February 2013 - 12:55 PM

Exactly! Does that mean it is safe though? I mean Many things do not have ingredients that contain gluteny items but if you prepare it on the same surface you flowered with wheat flour somebody is gonna get zonked

I wanted to add that I am not speaking about whole foods but prepared and processed foods and sauces, etc.
  • 0
Gluten and Oat Free 6/'12
Dairy, Corn and Yeast free 7/'12
Nightshade Free, Candida diet & low salicylates 8/'12
Nightshades and carbs and sugars limitedly reintroduced, most salicylates now tolerated 9/'12
No longer Reacting to yeasty breads 10/'12
Test confirmed yeast overgrowth, back on Candida diet 11/'12

You only get one life so make it count.

#4 kareng

kareng

    Dispeller of Shady

  • Moderators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 14,004 posts

Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:03 PM

I think common sense helps. It is not likely there is any wheat in a cheese factory, for example.

I realize someone will tell you there is gluten everywhere and if the guy picking the fruit eats wheat bread for lunch, your fruit is contaminated. I choose to use common sense. I choose to educate myself about how products are grown and made.
  • 0

"You have problems.  There are not enough paper clips, and then you've got world hunger.  Your problems are somewhere in between." -DPR,III

 

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator
 

LTES

 

purring-kitty-smiley-emoticon.gif

 


#5 psawyer

psawyer

    Moderator

  • Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 7,030 posts

Posted 12 February 2013 - 01:15 PM

Part of the reason for it is regulatory. Labeling something gluten-free means that it is a distinguishing characteristic of that product compared to other similar products. Labeling bananas gluten-free would be considered misleading by the FDA and CFIA because there is nothing special about those bananas.

You are allowed to say it two ways:
Bananas are naturally gluten-free.
These bananas, like all bananas, are gluten-free.

Testing for cross-contamination is a whole different issue. The claim on a tested product will read something like:
This product has been tested and contains less than 20 ppm gluten.
(20 is just an example--it will depend on the test used.)
  • 0
Peter
Diagnosis by biopsy of practically non-existent villi; gluten-free since July 2000.
Type 1 (autoimmune) diabetes diagnosed in March 1986
Markham, Ontario (borders on Toronto)

Celiac.com - Celiac Disease Board Moderator


0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

Celiac.com Sponsors: