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Secret Deodorant


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#1 DutchGirl

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 03:26 AM

I am newly diagnosed with celiac disease so I have been contacting all companies of my favorite product to make sure they are safe. This is the email I received back from Secret. What do you think? Would you use their product? ::

We know Celiac is a serious disease, so we want to give you clear information regarding the use of our beauty care products. If wheat and/or gluten aren't directly added to a product by us, these ingredients won't be listed on our packages. Like many companies, we often purchase the scents for fragranced products from outside suppliers, and the components of these substances are proprietary information belonging to those companies. Therefore it's possible that a very small amount (generally parts per million) of gluten may be present.

We sought advice from physicians; they told us it would be very unlikely a person with Celiac disease would have a reaction from a trace amount of gluten coming into contact with his skin or hair. This is because wheat, rye, barley and/or gluten generally cause symptoms when they're ingested. Since our beauty care products are designed to be used externally on the skin, their use shouldn't be an issue for someone with this disease.

Since gluten sensitivity can vary among people, it would be best if you consulted with your physician about the use of all types of consumable goods, if you haven't already. You might even consider using one of our fragrance free products that doesn't list gluten or wheat extracts on the label.

Thanks again for getting in touch with us. I hope this response has been helpful to you. For more information about Celiac, you may want to check out http://celiac.com/ and http://celiac.org

Sharmand
Secret Team
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#2 kareng

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 05:56 AM

Gluten must be in the GI track for a Celiac reaction. Many choose gluten-free lotions and shampoos because it is easy to get them in the mouth. I don't worry about deodorant.
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#3 mommida

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 06:56 AM

I didn't think deodorant would be a big deal about gluten. So I was using Ban Sweet Surender which has barley in it. Big mistake. I was having vague symptoms for 2 and a half weeks some time after I had started using it. How could it be possible? I don't really know, but I got rid of the Ban and got better. Was it caused by the length of my hair? Not coming out completely during laundering? Was it just some virus?

Lesson learned. Don't bring gluten things into the household if you have an alternative safe product you can use.
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#4 bartfull

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 08:47 AM

It's the aluminum in anti-perspirants that is a problem - for everyone, not just celiacs. I have heard there have been studies done that show women who apply anti-perspirant after shaving have a 30% higher incidence of breast cancer than women who don't.

I use milk of magnesia. A little messy to apply, and you have to let it dry before getting dressed, but old folks like me are used to that. It wasn't THAT long ago when deodorants came in liquid roll-on form.

The milk of magnesia absolutely KILLS all odor. It works better than anything on the market. I have even heard that people who have stinky feet can use it and it completely kills the odor for them too.
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gluten-free since June, 2011

Can't eat soy, corn, or foods high in salicylates.

Nightshades now seem to bother me too.

 

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#5 mommida

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:10 AM

Thanks for the tip Bartie! I know of the research showing the higher cancer risk, but I just don't know how to live longer ~if I had to smell bad. :D
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#6 Adalaide

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:15 AM

Thanks for the tip Bartie! I know of the research showing the higher cancer risk, but I just don't know how to live longer ~if I had to smell bad. :D


Quite easily. The stink will cause all the assassin ninjas to make a "phew!" noise as they sneak up on you, giving you the edge. It is surprising what smelling bad can do for you, and you can be sure to live a long and happy life free of assassin ninjas. People who wear deodorant never hear them coming. :ph34r:
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#7 mommida

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 09:33 AM

coffee spit on keyboard! :D I thought I heard some rustling earlier. :ph34r:
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#8 DutchGirl

 
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Posted 14 February 2013 - 01:21 PM

Thanks everyone for your replies! And for making be laugh! I have been reading Elisabeth Hasselbeck's book and I'm feeling pretty overwhelmed because it seems that EVERY product I use contains gluten.
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#9 Gemini

 
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Posted 15 February 2013 - 11:21 AM

Don't listen to Hasselbeck when it comes to Celiac....she's an empty headed celebrity who has been WRONG on many occasions with her supposed knowledge of this disease. Get a book by a real doctor or one recommended by a reputable celiac organization or a veteran celiac who has done their homework. Unless you have habits that will make it easy to ingest your products, or you have a topical wheat allergy, gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin. With time, you will learn all the in's and out's and be comfortable with this!
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#10 Adalaide

 
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Posted 15 February 2013 - 02:59 PM

Don't listen to Hasselbeck when it comes to Celiac....she's an empty headed celebrity who has been WRONG on many occasions with her supposed knowledge of this disease. Get a book by a real doctor or one recommended by a reputable celiac organization or a veteran celiac who has done their homework. Unless you have habits that will make it easy to ingest your products, or you have a topical wheat allergy, gluten cannot be absorbed through the skin. With time, you will learn all the in's and out's and be comfortable with this!


This is a very good point. I never checked to see if my deodorant is gluten free because I don't go around touching or licking my armpits. On the other hand, I do only use gluten free lotions and hair products. Not because I go around licking myself or am paranoid about absorbing it through my skin but because I am quite in the habit of touching my hair, face, etc and just don't want to take that sort of risk. Seems silly to me to try to break a totally benign habit when I can just not put gluten in my hair or on my body with lotion. Getting medical advice from random celebrities is probably not the best place to be getting it when there are so many reputable celiac specialists who are have books or websites with advice for free.
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"You don't look sick or anything"

"Well you don't look stupid, looks can be deceiving."

 

Celiac DX Dec 2012

CRPS DX March 2014


#11 DutchGirl

 
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Posted 15 February 2013 - 03:47 PM

I am open to book recommendations if anyone has some! That book was just recommended to me by a lot of people so I picked it up and have found it informative. I have DH on my scalp so I'm thinking that gluten free skin and hair products would be beneficial??!!
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#12 Takala

 
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Posted 17 February 2013 - 01:18 PM

I use baking soda for deodorant, after I had a really severe topical reaction to yet another deodorant a few years back. I have no idea what the ingredient was that set me off, but I don't want a repeat reaction. Now, much to my shock, the baking soda works MUCH BETTER than any deodorant I was using. I have this theory that the bottles of roll-on types or the solid waxy sticks pick up skin bacteria and store it, then it gets re applied to your skin, where it starts to grow and stink. I put the dry baking soda in another clean bottle and just sprinkle it on the damp skin and rub it so it is not clumped or thick. It does not look like it should work, but it does.

For shampoo, the Dr Bronner's is good. Dove is good, but the scent is too strong for my liking, it clashes with my other mild perfume. There are some other brands out there that have glutenfree versions, like Alaffia shea butter liquid soaps. I also have older hair that is color treated, so I tend to just rinse it daily, and save lathering it for when it needs it. Conditioner: I use diluted pure apple cider vinegar on my hair in a 7 parts water to 1 part vinegar solution, for a conditioner rinse or a spray on, after shampooing and rinsing. This corrects the pH closer to normal for hair, as soap is base and vinegar is acid. If my hair needs more, I then take a tiny amount of pure shea butter or coconut oil in my palm, and rub that into my hair thoroughly. Deep conditioning, put on the coconut oil first, more of it, then wash and rinse, respray with vinegar water.

I won't get into the whole "is this necessary or not argument" but I have very sensitive skin, and I was doing this before I cut my hair shorter, and I am a "hair twiddler" who plays with it absent mindedly, and this way I'm not touching a surface with a lot of conditioner with oats or wheat or soy and oil on it. I also don't want this stuff spreading all over my towels, pillowcases, etc, and I don't want the allergy- dog reacting if I give him something out of my hand. I am so thrilled that I finally found the class of ingredients I should not be putting on my scalp to make my skin blotch out and make my skin itch. I will do anything to reduce my overall exposure to gluten and oats. I do not care what the experts think of my routine. I was constantly having contact reaction skin problems when younger, from toiletries, and inspite of allergy testing, no one ever suggested to try to eliminate THIS from the soaps/lotions/makeup I used, it was all trial and error. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. Nothing like trying to go somewhere and having a reaction to your eye makeup, ggggrrrr :angry: :ph34r: grrrr, that makes you have tears running down your face, and you're in a rest room frantically trying to get it off. Went to mineral makeups, and that is no more. :)
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#13 DutchGirl

 
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Posted 17 February 2013 - 03:36 PM

I use baking soda for deodorant, after I had a really severe topical reaction to yet another deodorant a few years back. I have no idea what the ingredient was that set me off, but I don't want a repeat reaction. Now, much to my shock, the baking soda works MUCH BETTER than any deodorant I was using. I have this theory that the bottles of roll-on types or the solid waxy sticks pick up skin bacteria and store it, then it gets re applied to your skin, where it starts to grow and stink. I put the dry baking soda in another clean bottle and just sprinkle it on the damp skin and rub it so it is not clumped or thick. It does not look like it should work, but it does.

For shampoo, the Dr Bronner's is good. Dove is good, but the scent is too strong for my liking, it clashes with my other mild perfume. There are some other brands out there that have glutenfree versions, like Alaffia shea butter liquid soaps. I also have older hair that is color treated, so I tend to just rinse it daily, and save lathering it for when it needs it. Conditioner: I use diluted pure apple cider vinegar on my hair in a 7 parts water to 1 part vinegar solution, for a conditioner rinse or a spray on, after shampooing and rinsing. This corrects the pH closer to normal for hair, as soap is base and vinegar is acid. If my hair needs more, I then take a tiny amount of pure shea butter or coconut oil in my palm, and rub that into my hair thoroughly. Deep conditioning, put on the coconut oil first, more of it, then wash and rinse, respray with vinegar water.

I won't get into the whole "is this necessary or not argument" but I have very sensitive skin, and I was doing this before I cut my hair shorter, and I am a "hair twiddler" who plays with it absent mindedly, and this way I'm not touching a surface with a lot of conditioner with oats or wheat or soy and oil on it. I also don't want this stuff spreading all over my towels, pillowcases, etc, and I don't want the allergy- dog reacting if I give him something out of my hand. I am so thrilled that I finally found the class of ingredients I should not be putting on my scalp to make my skin blotch out and make my skin itch. I will do anything to reduce my overall exposure to gluten and oats. I do not care what the experts think of my routine. I was constantly having contact reaction skin problems when younger, from toiletries, and inspite of allergy testing, no one ever suggested to try to eliminate THIS from the soaps/lotions/makeup I used, it was all trial and error. Grrrrrrrrrrrrrrr. Nothing like trying to go somewhere and having a reaction to your eye makeup, ggggrrrr :angry: :ph34r: grrrr, that makes you have tears running down your face, and you're in a rest room frantically trying to get it off. Went to mineral makeups, and that is no more. :)

Thank you so much for all of the great information!! I bought some gluten free shampoo and conditioner today, it is Kirkland which is Costco's brand. I too am a hair twiddler, I have very long hair and DH on my scalp. I need to look into the mineral makeups as well, I have had an itchy rash between and in my eyebrows and now I know my makeup contains gluten. I would rather be safe than sorry with all of this, I have been SOOOOO sick for so long that it isn't worth it to me to chance it. Although it can make me a little bit crazy. I tend to be a huge germaphobe and now I am turning into a glutenaphobe, LOL.
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#14 jerseyangel

 
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Posted 17 February 2013 - 04:54 PM

I use crystal deodorant-- it's just mineral salts. I like that there is no residue at all, no odor, is effective, and I smell like me :)
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#15 coco676

 
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Posted 17 February 2013 - 06:26 PM

Ugh! Deodorant...one more thing to check. I was using some Degree and have been feeling a little irritated in that area, never would have crossed my mind that my deodorant should be gluten-free.
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