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psawyer

Member Since 28 Dec 2004
Offline Last Active Private
*****

Posts I've Made

In Topic: To Biopsy Or Not?

14 October 2014 - 06:12 AM

One of my biggest complaints about having to be gluten-free is trying to figure out WHAT is gluten-free (besides expensive pre-processed foods that are already marked). Simple things just throw me for a tizy making me paranoid that if it doesn't "say" specifically its gluten free (or I know its on a list somewhere) I'm scared to tears to eat it. I'm sure I'll get the hang of it in time, however.

It isn't really that hard. Learn to read labels. Wheat can not legally be hidden. There are a number of companies with a policy to clearly disclose any gluten source, including Con Agra, General Mills, Kraft and Unilever. Those companies cover a lot of brands, but look for the name of the parent somewhere on the label. If it is made by them, and you don't see a gluten grain called out in the ingredients, there isn't any there.

In Topic: Natural Flavoring

12 October 2014 - 06:45 PM

While "natural flavors" can contain gluten, they very rarely actually do. The most likely source would be barley malt, and that is a relatively expensive ingredient, so it is usually explicitly declared as "malt flavor."
 
If there were wheat in it, in the US (and Canada) it would be required by law to be disclosed as just that, "wheat."
 
Shelley Case on flavorings:

It would be rare to find a "natural or artificial flavoring" containing gluten (a) because hydrolyzed wheat protein cannot be hidden under the term "flavor." and (b) barley malt extract is almost always declared as "barley malt extract" or "barley malt flavoring." For this reason, most experts do not restrict natural and artificial flavorings in the gluten-free diet.
 
Gluten-Free Diet - A Comprehensive Resource Guide, published 2008, page 46

 
Note: As of August, 2012, Canada requires ALL gluten sources to be explicitly disclosed.

So, for me, it is not a concern.

In Topic: Soda..should It Be Eliminated?

08 October 2014 - 05:14 PM

Sodas are almost always gluten-free, but do read the ingredients.

Other reasons to wonder about them are caffeine, which is in colas and some other sodas, and phosphoric acid (colas and some root beer). Both of those can be stomach irritants and may be problematic if your gut is still healing.

Some people have trouble with high fructose corn syrup (HFCS), which replaced real sugar in most North American sodas about thirty years ago (think "New Coke").

In Topic: Is Wheat Glucose Syrup Always gluten-free?

07 October 2014 - 07:01 PM

It is gluten-free, but if your daughter is recently diagnosed, and recently on the diet, her intestines may still  be healing. If so, seemingly random reactions may just be part of the healing process.


In Topic: Gluten In Prescription Med.

05 October 2014 - 06:17 PM

It is not unusual for a person with celiac disease to have other sensitivities. Dairy and soy are the most common, but corn is another common one. For those folks, corn gluten is a problem. For the rest of us, the prolamin in corn, zein, is not a worry.