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psawyer

Member Since 28 Dec 2004
Offline Last Active Private
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#874062 Dental Cleaning Products

Posted by psawyer on 11 June 2013 - 07:31 PM

It might vary by location, but my dentist says there is no gluten in any of the cleaning agents used in his practice. We are in the Toronto area in Ontario, Canada. That article is from 2008. I wonder whether the author wants to draw business to his practice. Just saying.
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#872709 Seizures And Celiac? I Need To Get Some Thoughts

Posted by psawyer on 05 June 2013 - 06:57 AM

One of the symptoms by which celiac disease can manifest itself is seizures. This is more common in children than adults.
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#872629 Newly Diagnosed- Dealing With Rude Comments

Posted by psawyer on 04 June 2013 - 04:52 PM

Welcome to the board, Happy canary,
 

I have one friend who does the passive aggressive 'you miss out on so much' said with a subtext of 'its all in your head and you are making this up'. If I try to talk to her about it all she just changes the subject or pretends not to hear. I have tried to stick with it and not let it affect me but after reading this thread I realise that I am quite upset about it and will not eat with her anymore.

This is not the behavior of a friend. If she was your friend she would not do this.


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#871320 gluten-free Oats Have A 1 In 20 Chance Of Causing Celiac Attack

Posted by psawyer on 28 May 2013 - 08:39 PM

Some people with celiac disease react to oats, even if they are free of cross contamination. The protein in oats is somewhat similar to that in the other grains that trigger the celiac disease reaction. I tolerate pure oats, but would not consider a commercial product with oats as an ingredient.
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#870302 New At This.

Posted by psawyer on 23 May 2013 - 10:02 AM

Welcome, Michael,

 

Yes, the vast majority of people do heal after time on a strict gluten-free diet. I had significant damage at the time of my diagnosis. A follow-up examination five years later found no evidence at all of celiac disease in my intestines.


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#869033 "people With A Preexisting Condition"

Posted by psawyer on 15 May 2013 - 07:42 PM

If you get the flu vaccine make sure you know what is in it.  I saw on the website of the Center for Disease Control http://www.cdc.gov/v...n/additives.htm Thimerosal (mercury) is in it..  They also list fermeldahyde as a possible ingredient in vaccines.    They have a list of each specific vaccine and its contents. 
 
I don't get vaccines  I read the label and consider whether this is for my best health or not.  Just as I would anything I put into my mouth...  I take my health seriously and do follow a careful diet, garden, and exercise. 
 
. You can find literature with each vaccination box.  You Physician should be able to give the list to you as you consider what is in the vaccine.  You may find some surprises if you look carefully into what each ingredient is.
 
 
I found evidence .on the center for Disease Control that abortion materials are  in some vaccines.  I copied the ingredients for Adenovirus. PSAWYER just pointed out that this is not the flu.It is an example of the ingredients in one vaccine:  The adenovirus vaccine.
 
 
sucrose, D-mannose, D-fructose, dextrose, potassium phosphate, plasdone C, anhydrous lactose, micro crystalline cellulose, polacrilin potassium, magnesium stearate, cellulose acetate phthalate, alcohol, acetone, castor oil, FD&C Yellow #6 aluminum lake dye, human serum albumin, fetal bovine serum, sodium bicarbonate, human-diploid fibroblast cell cultures (WI-38), Dulbecco’s Modified Eagle’s Medium
To clarify it is the human-dipoid  cell cultures which I believe are from an aborted fetus.  I have discussed this with a few medical doctors and they did not deny it.
 
Incase you need a to find out what a human diploid cell is I went here to find out about it.http://www.ncbi.nlm....C377233/?page=1  I believe these cells are also called stem cells.
 
I am sorry that I did not fully support this at first.  My wording, I thought, was stronger than it should have been.  I would not have picked this fight here on the forum, but forgot that it was not common knowledge.  I hope that you will forgive this.  I also hope that I have fully supported my position with credible sources.
 
I previously said that there is human ingredients in the vaccine, but I meant some vaccines and now have revised it to be more correct.   I am sorry it was necessary to make this change but my edits have been intended to make the information that I shared more accurate.  I cannot share which vaccines are flu, because I do not know.  I did, however, refer to the CDC for all to check the ingredients.
 
I am perfectly willing to rewrite this with just the link to read the lists of ingredients and a caution to do so if that will be acceptable.  I hesitate to do it now, because some have replied to it and I cannot change those.
 
Diana

I again quote post #2. It has been edited many times, but the edit window is now closed, and this will be the final version. Nevertheless, I am capturing it (again).

The source cited at the CDC lists 51 vaccines. Of those, six (6) are for Influenza (flu). None of those six contain material from human cells.

Material cultured from human stem cells is used to produce vaccines for Hepatitis-A and Rubella (German measles). Viruses must be grown on live cells, and so far research has not found an alternative host for these two viruses.

The Adenovirus vaccine was mentioned. It is not related to flu, and is not in general use, but is made by one manufacturer under contract to the US Department of Defense. If you are in the US military, it may be of concern to you.

To sum up, and end this discussion:

With regard to the original question, there is no reason for someone with celiac disease to avoid the flu vaccine because of celiac disease.

The flu vaccine does not contain material derived from human stem cells.

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#868843 Hidden Foods! Was Doing So Well!

Posted by psawyer on 15 May 2013 - 05:03 AM

I am not aware of a source such as you are looking for, and would not recommend it even if I did.

 

The problem with a list--any list--is that products change all the time. A list is based on a moment in time. The example of the product you have in hand may be newer, or older, than the information in the list.

 

It does seem overwhelming at first, but over time you get to know what isn't safe and what to question. If in doubt, read the ingredients. Wheat must be clearly disclosed in both the US and Canada. Rye and oats don't appear in unexpected places, but barley can be listed as malt without disclosing the source in the US.

 

Canada adopted new rules effective August 4, 2012, that require all gluten sources to be explicitly disclosed by naming the grain in question. Products packaged prior to that date may still be in stores.

 

Read the ingredients.


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#868702 Battling No Food

Posted by psawyer on 14 May 2013 - 01:01 PM

The original poster started this topic, and may have actually read the first reply, but has not logged in since before the second reply was posted.


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#868324 Is Genetically Modified Wheat Common Now-Days Responsible For This Condition?

Posted by psawyer on 12 May 2013 - 06:17 PM

Certainly, wheat has been selectively bred for a long time to make certain properties more prevalent. It is still all considered the sames genus, triticum. At least twenty species exist in that genus, all of which must be strictly avoided by anyone who has an intolerance to gluten.

To understand variations within a species, here is an example. Canis lupus familiaris is a subspecies of canis lupis, the gray wolf. There has been much selective breeding here, too. Within that subspecies, we find Great Danes and toy poodles. Biologically they are of the same subspecies, but have very different traits. If you interbreed them, the offspring will be genetically viable and able to reproduce. What traits they will have is a mystery.

So, are you saying that toy poodles are not natural?
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#868256 "people With A Preexisting Condition"

Posted by psawyer on 12 May 2013 - 11:15 AM

If you get the flu vaccine make sure you know what is in it.  I don't get them because they put in mercury, fermeldahide, and materials derived from abortions.  I take my health seriously and do follow a careful diet, garden, and exercise.  One can find out what they contain by visiting (USA) the Center for Disease Control Website.

Provide evidence to support this allegation, or withdraw it. Rule 5.


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#868166 Urgent Help Blood Pressure Medications

Posted by psawyer on 11 May 2013 - 08:20 PM

Maize is the scientific name for corn. That name is also used in Europe. Maize is not "from" corn--it iscorn, just by an unfamiliar name.
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#867917 Are These Blood Tests Sufficient To Diagnose Celiac?

Posted by psawyer on 10 May 2013 - 12:16 PM

4 slices?  Wow.  Right now I eat one slice of flourless bread every day.  Not sure I could handle 4.

 

If I eat a giant slice of cake the night before the blood test, could that give me a more accurate diagnosis?

The most common suggestion is that 2 slices of bread (or the equivalent in other forms) a day is enough. Flourless bread might not work at all, since the flour is the gluten source.

 

Antibodies build up over time, hence the 12 weeks. A big load the night before won't make much difference.


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#867796 Does Gluten Always Cause A Reaction?

Posted by psawyer on 09 May 2013 - 06:02 PM

This is not an area of celiac knowledge that I have spent a lot of time on, so my thoughts may not be 100% informed. They have, however, guided me through almost thirteen years of being diagnosed with celiac disease and following the gluten-free diet.

Some people with celiac disease do not experience any detectable symptoms, even though there is damage to the villi. These "silent celiacs" never notice a reaction.

Celiac disease is a contest. Gluten causes the immune system to react. The more gluten, the larger the reaction. The reaction produces antibodies. Sensitivity, and therefore production levels, vary from person to person. The tests have limits and are not able to reliably detect antibodies at low levels.

Our bodies want to heal, and the villi slowly regenerate. How quickly this happens varies with many factors. Key ones are that younger people seem to heal faster, and that the more serious the damage originally was, the longer it may take.

So what does that all mean? It seems to me that as long as your healing rate is moving faster than the damage is being done, you are winning the game.

 

But if you want blood tests to be accurate (your insurance will only pay once), don't play around. Eat lots of gluten (a slice or two of regular bread a day) over a period of several weeks prior to testing.


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#867595 Positive Blood Tests, Not Wanting To Go Through Endoscopie

Posted by psawyer on 09 May 2013 - 04:25 AM

Actually, celiac disease awareness in much of Europe is far greater than in North America.


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#866738 Alcohol And Black Puke?

Posted by psawyer on 03 May 2013 - 07:51 PM

It was a long time ago, and you are still here to talk about it. Not a concern for you any more.

But for others who might read the topic, the information about this being a medical emergency may be helpful.
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