Jump to content

Follow Us:  Twitter Facebook RSS Feed            




   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


dermgirl

Member Since 16 Mar 2010
Offline Last Active May 26 2010 12:48 PM
-----

Topics I've Started

Scopes Tomorrow!

07 April 2010 - 12:37 PM

Tomorrow is my day for colonoscopy and endoscopy....I waited over 2 months to see a gastro, I was forunate he has openings this week for the scopes. He is a specialist in celiac and gluten sensitivity. I am so thankful, because my other doctor has not a clue. He didn't even run the correct celiac panel. He said it was negative, to eat more bananas & take calcium. OMG! I did testing through Enterolab, I have 1 celiac gene & tested positvie for gluten sensitivity. I will be glad when Dr. Fine publishes his studies. I have been eating gluten since yesterday. Now I am saying so long to gluten....I am beginning to think it is posion for all! I cleaned my kitchen out yesterday, bags going to the homeless shelter (I worry about them too!) I have been researching recipes, trying to gear up! I have a son in college who has some of the same issues I have. He stopped eating gluten--feels so much better! I have a supportive family, so I am blessed! I have to say I am starving today, right now I am sipping on yummy chicken broth. I have to start the laxitives at 4pm...which is so funny, I have chronic diarrea. For those of you who pray, I would covet your prayers for tomorrow, I am nervous. This is my first scope. I am thankful for this forum, up until a few months ago, I could not have told you what celiac or gluten problems were about. I just keep thinking, how many people are suffering every singe day??? How many people are actually willing to change their lifestyle to feel better? I know it is worth it to me....I can't wait to start feeling better!

Blessings!
Bev

Sick 16 Year Old!

25 March 2010 - 01:13 PM

These doctors today drive me mad. I have a 16 year old daughter who is sick. Here is the run down or I should say her run down, 2008 she had mono...she has never been the same since. She catches everything...she has no energy, she sleeps when she gets home from school. I took her to the doctor last summer because she had a wierd rash only on her knees and elbows. Doctor said it must be contact dermatitis??? She has gained 15 pounds in the last 6 months, suffering with a headaches every day. She has had a MRI, which was clear. A cat scan...showed a sinus infection. She does not have any stomach issues (as of yet). I suggested the doc check her thyroid....since I have hashimotos. She now has hypothyroidism and is hypoglycemic!! I was tested by blood test for celiac last month, it was negative. I paid to have Enterolab do gluten sensitvity test and the gene test. I do have a HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)--and a 17 on IgA. I have an appointment scheduled a gastro in a few weeks. My issue is all stomach..and eczema. I took her in to today for a follow up on her thyroid. I have to admit until a month ago, I had never heard of celiac or gluten sensitivity. After my research and receiving my entero labs back, my eyes are wide open. I see the puzzle connecting. I don't want her to have to wait 40 years before she is diagnosed. Today the doctor basically looked at me like I was an idiot. I explained to him about my testing results, he let me know how that was "not" in his medical books! He obviously thought she was depressed. I let him know if he felt as bad as she does, he might be depressed also. He just wanted to give her a pill for depression! He had NEVER heard of a fecal gluten sensitivity test, nor did he believe it was legitimate. I suggested he may want to do his own reesearch! I convinced him to do a full celiac blood panel, yesterday I ordered the same enterolab tests I had done a few weeks ago. I also requested he send her to the gastro...which is familiar with the whole gluten and celiac issues. I have learned how important it is to do your research and fight for your own health! As soon as my scopes are done and she has completed her enterolab tests...this family is going to be gluten free. I am so frustrated about the medical care. Why don't doctors listen?? I just had to vent....but wonder if this has happened to others?

Enterolab Results Advice

17 March 2010 - 04:10 AM

Hello,
I am new to this group and the world of glutens. I need help. I had a negative blood test one month ago for Celiac. I just received my test results form Enterolab yesterday. I will post those below. I have a dr. appt April 5 to see a gastro. I visit with him, and I have a scopes scheduled. Should I continue to eat gluten until after this tests?

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 17 Units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 5 Units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units

Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 7 Units

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal, and hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score (Normal Range is less than 300 Units): Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab...erpretation.htm

Stool Analysis performed by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab
Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross
Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab

Thank You For Allowing EnteroLab to Help You Attain Optimum Intestinal And Overall Health.

Thanks fo your help

Enterolab Test Back Today-I Am New-Need Help!

16 March 2010 - 04:53 PM

Hello!
I am new to this whole thing. I am 46, have had stomach issues as lon as I remember. For the last few months, it has gotten worse. I had not been able to make it to the bathromm a few time...so that sent me on a mission to find out what is wrong with me. Wow...my eyes are opened! I have had Hashimotos since I was 21, excema since I was 7, and low B12. I noticed my 20 year old was having some of my same issues (stomach). I would eat and feel like a had a rock in the upper right quadrant of my stomach. I tested negative for Celiac by blood tests last month. I mad an appointment with a gasto for next month. I received my Enterolab results today...need help...any advice would be grateful...I know I need to begin a life on 0 gluten...need help! Here are my results:

A) Gluten Sensitivity Stool and Gene Panel Complete *Best test/best value
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: 17 Units

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: 5 Units

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: Less than 300 Units

Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA: 7 Units

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1: 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2: 0301

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,7)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal, and hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score (Normal Range is less than 300 Units): Provided that dietary fat is being ingested, a fecal fat score less than 300 indicates there is no malabsorbed dietary fat in stool indicating that digestion and absorption of nutrients is currently normal.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow's milk) IgA (Normal Range is less than 10 Units): Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic "sensitivity" to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have one of the main genes that predisposes to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Each of your offspring has a 50% chance of receiving this gene from you, and at least one of your parents passed it to you. You also have a non-celiac gene predisposing to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 not by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 not by HLA-DQB1*0302). Having one celiac gene and one gluten sensitive gene, means that each of your parents, and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of a gluten sensitive gene. Having two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe.

For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab...erpretation.htm

Stool Analysis performed by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab
Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross
Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab

Thank You For Allowing EnteroLab to Help You Attain Optimum Intestinal And Overall Health.