Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


Gutsy Girl

Member Since 22 May 2010
Offline Last Active Nov 18 2011 10:38 AM
-----

Topics I've Started

Emotions And Our Guts!

29 December 2010 - 07:33 PM

Having big time gut problems, we tend to be acutely aware of how emotions affect our GI system. I personally lived my whole life from childhood in school, through college, and in the workforce KNOWING that if I experienced almost any emotion rather strongly, I was going to have to make a mad dash for the loo and pray I arrived in time before the package was delivered.

Though I seem to handle mild excitement and happy feelings fairly well, I found that any negative emotions or startles were a big big problem. From the most to least problematic, being:

Startled/Surprised (typically by bad news)
Scared/Afraid
Embarrassed
Frustrated
Significantly Angry

I also have Generalized Anxiety Disorder, which certainly compounds the problem.

Have ya'll found some solutions or ways to manage these emotions so that they don't give you a full colon cleanse 3-5 minutes after they register in your brain?

Do you (like me) sometimes not even realize you were feeling ________ (insert offending emotion) until AFTER your guts have gone haywire?

Have ya'll done any reading up on research connecting the mind with the GI tract? Some doctors call the GI system the "second brain". Most of your neurotransmitters are actually created in your GI system too! (Lightbulbs going off for folks wondering why so many of us bad gut people have emotional/mental health challenges?)


Cheers! And thanks for the help and hopefully not-so-stimulating discussion, if you get my stink-free drift.

Gluten Ataxia Neuropathy Neurological Presentation

13 December 2010 - 09:22 PM

Your Brain on Gluten

This is interesting. ..gluten can actually cause UBO's (unidentified bright objects) on the brain that show up in MRI scans. It can also cause "pins and needles" or "crawly-like" feelings all over the body...something a lot of us struggle with. - PH

Your brain on gluten: Should you lay off the gluten before it's too late?

There is reasonable evidence of neurological problems in Celiac disease even those well treated on a gluten-free diet should undergo periodic neurological screening. Peripheral neuropathy is found in almost half of people with celiac disease. Previously, neurological complications in Celiac disease were reported to be as high as 36% or more than a third.

Some unexplained neurological problems are present but not recognized by the patient or their doctor in many patients and some have several problems. Unfortunately, since brain imaging is not routinely done or recommended in those who are newly diagnosed with Celiac disease we don't really know how high these numbers may be really be. More staggering is the fact that we are still learning about people who fail to meet diagnostic criteria for Celiac disease but are being found to have gluten related neurological problems that respond to a gluten-free diet.

The symptoms of neuropathy are paresthesia (numbness) or dysthesia (burning, tingling, heaviness, "pins and needles" sensation"). Many of my patients also describe hypersensitivity of their skin such that they do not like air blowing on them or their children or spouses against their skin. Some admit to "bug crawling" sensation on their skin, something called vermiculation in medical terms but rarely asked about or given much thought by most doctors.

Odd muscle movements under the skin that some call a "bag of worms" medically known as fasiculations are also very common but dismissed by many doctors. My wife, a physician with Celiac disease, actually had these occur while undergoing an EMG (electromyleograph, recording of muscle activity by placing needle electrode into the muscle) exam by an older neurologist. Despite observing these occurring visually and the monitor showing "static like noise" the neurologist dismissed them as "normal".

Many patients with Celiac disease also have what the radiologists and neurologists call "UBO's" on MRI exams of the brain. These unidentified bright objects (think UFO) are white spots that show up on images of the brain. When found in certain locations of the brain they are highly suggestive of multiple sclerosis (multiple scarring spots in the brain). However, though many people with Celiac disease have MS like symptoms and these symptoms often respond to a gluten free diet when started early enough, the UBO's seen on MRI of the brain are typically not in the classic areas of MS. Instead it is common to find them in areas of the brain associated with migraines or balance difficulty (ataxia).

Personally and professionally I have observed all of the neurological complications of Celiac disease and most of them I have also noted in patients in whom I have not been able to confirm Celiac disease but who have what I believe are objective signs and/or genetic risk for gluten sensitivity. I have patients with MS-like symptoms, chronic unexplained neuropathy, headaches, attention difficulties, autistic behaviors and developmental delays who have responded to gluten-free diet but if they had listened to doctors who maintained such a "restrictive, expensive, hard to follow" diet should only be "imposed" on those with a established diagnosis of Celiac disease.

If you have neurological problems get testing for Celiac disease before starting a gluten-free diet. If you test negative for Celiac disease, make sure they test you for the complete HLA DQ genetics that includes the high-risk white blood cell patterns DQ2 and DQ8 for Celiac disease AND get your Celiac disease blood tests include IgG and IgA gliadin antibodies. If your blood tests, including gliadin IgA and IgG antibodies, are negative or normal then consider stool testing for gliadin antibodies in the stool ($99, www.enterolab. com).

The evidence continues to accumulate, though often ignored or missed, that gluten is toxic to some people's brains, even if they do not have Celiac disease. If you do have Celiac disease it is likely you already have neurological problems and may be at risk despite being on a gluten-free diet.

Borrowing from the old advertisement against drug abuse "this is your brain on drugs" maybe we should be getting the word out "this is your brain on gluten". Despite your test results, consider a trial of gluten-free diet after you have your testing done if you have unexplained or unresponsive neurological problems. You owe to your brain. Like my seven-year-old son said to one of our friends, "maybe you should lay off the gluten".

Copyright 2008, The Food Doc, LLC, All Rights Reserved.
www.thefooddoc.com
http://thefooddoc.bl...ou-lay-off.html