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WVSweetie Pie

Member Since 22 Aug 2010
Offline Last Active Nov 22 2011 07:42 AM
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Posts I've Made

In Topic: Garlic Croutons

22 November 2011 - 06:00 AM

Thanks, Peter. That certainly answers my questions and gives me a good recipe to boot!

In Topic: Can Gluten-Free Diet Cause Diabetes Or High Sugar Results?

07 February 2011 - 03:14 PM

missy'smom: Thanks so much for your informative and helpful replies. I have looked at the link you provided and undertstand some of it, but will need more time to process more of it. My 105 reading was a fasting test and my doctor told me that I need to come in and have an AI test now. I believe that she is on top of this early, but I will not accept a diagnosis of diabetes without the other, more involved test.

This was the first time my score has ever been at or over 100, although it's always hovered in the 90's. I do understand what the "white" food items do to blood sugar which is why I questioned my gluten-free starches/carbs which now seem to consist of white rice, tapioca flour, etc.

Thanks again for all of your help.

In Topic: Can Gluten-Free Diet Cause Diabetes Or High Sugar Results?

07 February 2011 - 03:07 PM

To answer your question, I don't believe that gluten-free diet or the change in carbs will cause diabetes. If you have impaired tolerance for glucose(which carbs are turned into) then an increase in carbs, especially rapidly processed carbs will cause more of a strain on your system. Not all carbs are created equal, there are the refined carbs (gluten-free or not)white things-rice flour, white potatoes, sugar etc., the whole grains are more slowly digested so will hit the blood stream more slowly, however for some who have more impairment, they are still too carby, then there are starchy vegetables and finally low-carbohydrate veggies, which have the least impact on blood sugar. Things like nuts have carbs but have less impact on blood sugar, which is why some who manage blood sugar with a low-carbohydrate diet use almond meal and flax meal as their sole flour in baking. Coconut flour is also used.

The human body, in general has a limited ability to process carbs so overloading in quantity or quality will eventually lead to impairment in many people.