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Christi1996

Member Since 14 Oct 2010
Offline Last Active Apr 13 2011 10:18 PM
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Topics I've Started

I Just Got My Entero Lab Results And I Am Not Surprised But A Bit Confused

18 March 2011 - 11:01 PM

While it is nice to get confirmation that it is not all in my head, I would like to be normal and not worry about the whole gluten-free and now dairy-free too.

What has me completely confused is the gene testing. It says I have 2 copies of the DQB1-0201 and DBQ1-0302 so it that 4 genes (or maybe chromosomes) or 2 and then what is the HLA-DQ 2,3 (subtype 2,8).

I loved the genetics portion of biology but that was 20 years ago and it didn't go into this depth. Is there an Idiots Guide to Gene Testing?

Oh and what is the Anti-tissue Trasglutaminase?

Anyway, here are the actual results:
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 37 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 10 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score 549 Units (Normal Range is less than 300 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 13 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0201

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0302

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,3 (Subtype 2,8)


Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: Intestinal antigliadin IgA antibody was elevated, indicating that you have active dietary gluten sensitivity. For optimal health, resolution of symptoms (if you have them), and prevention of small intestinal damage and malnutrition, osteoporosis, and damage to other tissues (like nerves, brain, joints, muscles, thyroid, pancreas, other glands, skin, liver, spleen, among others), it is recommended that you follow a strict and permanent gluten free diet. As gluten sensitivity is a genetic syndrome, you may want to have your relatives screened as well.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: You have an autoimmune reaction to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase, secondary to dietary gluten sensitivity.

Interpretation of Quantitative Microscopic Fecal Fat Score: A fecal fat score greater than or equal to 300 Units indicates there is an increased amount of dietary fat in the stool which usually is due to gluten-induced small intestinal malabsorption/damage when associated with gluten sensitivity. Values between 300-600 Units are mild elevations, 600-1000 Units moderate elevations, and values greater than 1000 Units are severe elevations. Any elevated fecal fat value should be rechecked in one year after treatment to ensure that it does not persist because chronic fat malabsorption is associated with osteoporosis among other nutritional deficiency syndromes.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: Levels of fecal IgA antibody to a food antigen greater than or equal to 10 are indicative of an immune reaction, and hence immunologic “sensitivity” to that food. For any elevated fecal antibody level, it is recommended to remove that food from your diet. Values less than 10 indicate there currently is minimal or no reaction to that food and hence, no direct evidence of food sensitivity to that specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: HLA-DQB1 gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of the main genes that predispose to gluten sensitivity and celiac sprue, HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302. Having two copies of a gluten sensitive or celiac gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity or celiac disease may be more severe