Jump to content



   arrowShare this page:
   

   Get email alerts  Subscribe to FREE Celiac.com email alerts

 
Ads by Google:
Celiac.com Sponsor:                                    


parmeisan

Member Since 03 Jun 2012
Offline Last Active Apr 09 2013 06:50 AM
-----

Posts I've Made

In Topic: Eating gluten-free And Gaining Weight

28 September 2012 - 02:42 PM

Just wanted to say that most of that was for the original poster. After having read through the thread more (yeah, I should have done it first) I did add some more. This (editted in, so you might have missed it) was mostly for you:

PS. I do know how hard it is to find motivation for this sort of thing when you are in gluten withdrawal or just feeling fatigued. If you're not there yet, put in on a shelf in your mind and do it later. There's no hurry. You'll feel better soon.


You said you're pretty new at gluten-free, right? I think that it's probably just going to take some time before you get the energy levels you're used to having. If they don't end up coming back, then something else is the problem: that level of fatigue is not normal. (Although I'm sure most of us went through a stage where we thought it was). Figure out what's sapping your energies, and I'm sure you'll be just fine.

In Topic: Eating gluten-free And Gaining Weight

28 September 2012 - 01:18 PM

Oops, I guess I'm not the first to say that. Still true.

Also, if you're using MyFitnessPal - note that it lets you enter recipes. It was much easier to put in the mixed cereal I eat every morning once I realized I could do it that way, instead of selecting all the items again or copying over the meal. That way, you can eat more or less of it each day without altering every single ingredient.


PS. I do know how hard it is to find motivation for this sort of thing when you are in gluten withdrawal or just feeling fatigued. If you're not there yet, put in on a shelf in your mind and do it later. There's no hurry. You'll feel better soon.

In Topic: Eating gluten-free And Gaining Weight

28 September 2012 - 01:15 PM

I had heard before that to lose weight, you only had to eat fewer calories than you burned... but I never really believed it was that simple. It is, actually. There's more to being healthy - nutrients, etc - but there are exactly two ways to lose weight:

1. Exercise more
2. Eat fewer calories

Exercising is great, but it only gains you like 200 calories for a lot of time & effort... whereas a tiny, tiny bag of chips is over 300 calories. So controlling diet is actually the easier way, at least at first (exercising helps your metabolism get better, so it's good for the long run).

I am telling you this fresh off of having lost 10 pounds myself (and still going) so I hope you believe me when I say, it's not as hard as you might think: try counting your calories. For one week, even - you only have to keep going if you really want to. For one week, write down everything you eat. There are completely free websites that can help you do this, and they're super easy to use. Most of them have apps so you can do it from your phone. (I use MyFitnessPal, but there are others).

This does several things:

a) Makes you think twice about eating something, since you have to mark it down.
b) Helps you to realize where your problem areas are. (I never knew *just* how many veggies you need to eat to match a cup of rice. Sure, you're not as full from veggies, but subtract just a little rice and add some carrots, and you're golden).
c) Makes you feel less guilty about the "bad" things you eat. There is no cheating - just eat a little less elsewhere. No worries.
d) Gives you more motivation to eat less. Back when I didn't think about it, I'd eat 3 links of sausage without blinking. Now I know that that's 750 calories! No thanks, I'll just eat one, and supplement it with something else. Or butter on popcorn! It just about triples the calorie value! Maybe I'll have just a little less of that...
e) Motivation to exercise. You get free eating later when you do!

Do that for a week, and you'll learn so much that you probably won't need to keep doing it. (Although it gets easier because the app will remember the things you eat a lot or have eaten recently).

Good luck!

In Topic: Other Tests To Do

11 September 2012 - 01:41 PM

After the blood test, my doctor told me I "might" have Celiac. I asked him if it might be prudent to get off of gluten (at that point I knew very little) and he said OK, but that I would have to go on again prior to the biopsy. So I'd say that the diet was my choice. Anyway, after I tried to go back on gluten and didn't think I could stick with it, I talked to my doctor again and pushed him as to whether or not he'd be willing to give me a diagnosis without the biopsy, in case I ever needed it for anything. He said yes, but to talk to the GI in case he still wanted to do the biopsy without a challenge, which turned out to be the case. So... I don't think I'd call that "told I have Celiac". He wants to help and he's generally been a good doctor for me, but he really doesn't know what he's doing here.

I have been off gluten for nearly 3 months at this point (less about 10 days, I would say), going back to the three weeks I first challenged. Before that, I had been off for about 6 weeks. That's probably long enough to know? I mean, I certainly feel good right now. Great, even. But it's hard to know, and even harder for others who know very little about celiac disease to accept. And besides, even if I'm 98% sure that I have celiac disease (which on the good days, I am), this would help to tell me whether I have *other* allergies/intolerances/whatever that I need to know about. If the reaction to gluten is similar to my mystery episodes, then case closed, right? At this point in time I should get over it quicker than I ever will in the future. And if there *is* no reaction, then extra-bonus: I can challenge somewhat properly for the biopsy.

It sounds so reasonable (to me) when I think about it like that, but it IS stupid, isn't it?


PS. I believe the reference ranges for all three tests for "greater than 10 means maybe Celiac".

In Topic: Other Tests To Do

10 September 2012 - 01:08 PM

Every time I think I've made a decision, I find out something new. :P

I just did another celiac.com-binge and spent a couple hours surfing around on here. I discovered the possibility of gluten withdrawal, which I hadn't heard of before. So even if I get sick right away and don't eat any other gluten, and I get over it within a week or so (which seems reasonable because I've gotten over the cc's within a day - I'm guessing I'm not too sensitive yet because I'm still new at this) I might reset any progress I've made on getting over this addiction.

I just don't even know.