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tripfecta

Member Since 07 Aug 2012
Offline Last Active Nov 18 2012 11:07 AM
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Topics I've Started

Enterolab Results - Help Me Understand Gene Results

02 November 2012 - 01:44 PM

I'm a little confused by my results. Are they indicative of Celiac or gluten sensitivity? My symptoms have gone away since I have gone gluten free, so I will continue that path. Since I have genes from both parents, should I have my children tested? They have been gluten free for a couple months, but I'm wondering if I should have them do the gluten challenge and do a blood test for them. They (triplets) are almost two, but I only saw symptoms in one of my daughters. Not sure where to go with my kids, as I'm seeing improvements with their gluten free diet, but it would be helpful to get an official diagnosis.
Any insight or advice is appreciated. Thank you!!


These are my results:

Date: 11/2/2012

B) Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool/Gene Panel
Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA 8 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-soy IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 1 0202

HLA-DQB1 Molecular analysis, Allele 2 0501

Serologic equivalent: HLA-DQ 2,1 (Subtype 2,5)

Add Anti-Tissue Transglutaminase Antibody to panel A+C, A, B, or C at a discounted price
Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA 2 Units (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA: The level of intestinal anti-gliadin IgA antibody was below the upper limit of normal, and hence there is no direct evidence of active gluten sensitivity from this test. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), the level of fecal anti-gliadin antibody can be normal despite clinically significant gluten sensitivity. Therefore, if you have a syndrome known to be associated with gluten sensitivity (of which there are many but mainly falling into six categories abbreviated as NAAAGS – neuropsychiatric, autoimmune, asthma, abdominal, glandular deficiencies/hyperactivity, or skin diseases) or symptoms of gluten sensitivity (such as abdominal symptoms - pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation, chronic headaches, chronic sinus congestion, depression, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue), a gluten-free diet may help you despite a negative test.

If you have no syndrome or symptoms associated with gluten sensitivity, you can follow a gluten-containing healthy diet and retest in 3-5 years; or you may opt to go gluten-free purely as a preventive measure. If you have been on a gluten-free diet or reduced gluten diet for many months or years at the time of testing, this can (but not always) reduce your fecal antigliadin antibody level into the normal range despite underlying gluten sensitivity. (Usually it takes two or more years of a gluten-free diet to normalize a previously elevated fecal antigliadin antibody level, depending on the strictness of the diet; however, sometimes, this time period can be shorter, especially if the original value was only minimally elevated.)

For additional information on result interpretation, as well as educational information on the subject of gluten sensitivity, please see the "FAQ Result Interpretation," "FAQ Gluten/Food Sensitivity," and "Research & Education" links on our EnteroLab.com website.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA: A value less than 10 Units indicates that there currently is minimal or no immunologic reaction to milk, and hence no direct evidence of food sensitivity to this specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, such as chronic headaches, abdominal symptoms (pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation), chronic sinus congestion, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. If you have been on a diet reduced or devoid of the suspect food for many months or years (usually but not always requires two or more years), this can also (but will not always) reduce your fecal antibody level to that food into the normal range despite underlying ongoing sensitivity to that food.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA: A value less than 10 Units indicates that there currently is minimal or no immunologic reaction to egg, and hence no direct evidence of food sensitivity to this specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, such as chronic headaches, abdominal symptoms (pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation), chronic sinus congestion, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. If you have been on a diet reduced or devoid of the suspect food for many months or years (usually but not always requires two or more years), this can also (but will not always) reduce your fecal antibody level to that food into the normal range despite underlying ongoing sensitivity to that food.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-soy IgA: A value less than 10 Units indicates that there currently is minimal or no immunologic reaction to soy, and hence no direct evidence of food sensitivity to this specific food. However, because 1 in 500 people cannot make IgA at all, and rarely, some immunocompetent people can still have clinically significant reactions to a food antigen despite the lack of a significant antibody reaction (because the reactions primarily involve T cells), if you have an immune syndrome or symptoms associated with food sensitivity, such as chronic headaches, abdominal symptoms (pain, cramping, bloating, gas, diarrhea and/or constipation), chronic sinus congestion, arthritis, chronic skin problems/rashes, fibromyalgia, and/or chronic fatigue, it is recommended that you try a strict removal of suspect foods from your diet for up to 12 months despite a negative test. If you have been on a diet reduced or devoid of the suspect food for many months or years (usually but not always requires two or more years), this can also (but will not always) reduce your fecal antibody level to that food into the normal range despite underlying ongoing sensitivity to that food.

Interpretation Of HLA-DQ Testing: Although you do not possess the main HLA-DQB1 genes predisposing to celiac sprue (HLA-DQB1*0201 or HLA-DQB1*0302), HLA gene analysis reveals that you have two copies of a gene that predisposes to gluten sensitivity (any DQ1, DQ2 other than by HLA-DQB1*0201, or DQ3 other than by HLA-DQB1*0302). Furthermore, HLA-DQ2 genes other than by HLA-DQB1*0201 can be associated with celiac sprue in rare cases. Having two copies of a gluten sensitive gene means that each of your parents and all of your children (if you have them) will possess at least one copy of the gene. Two copies also means there is an even stronger predisposition to gluten sensitivity than having one gene and the resultant immunologic gluten sensitivity may be more severe. This test was developed and its performance characteristics determined by the American Red Cross - Northeast Division. It has not been cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

Interpretation of Fecal Anti-tissue Transglutaminase IgA: The level of intestinal IgA antibodies to the human enzyme tissue transglutaminase was below the upper limit of normal. Hence, there is no evidence of a gluten-induced autoimmune reaction to this enzyme.

For more information about result interpretation, please see http://www.enterolab.../FaqResult.aspx

Stool analysis performed and/or supervised by: Frederick Ogunji, Ph.D., EnteroLab
Molecular Gene Analysis performed by: American Red Cross
Interpretation of all results by: Kenneth D. Fine, M.D., EnteroLab

Thank You For Allowing EnteroLab to Help You Attain Optimum Intestinal And Overall Health.

Symptoms - Thinking It's Celiac

07 August 2012 - 07:27 AM

For years I have had GI issues, mainly diarrhea, bloating, and gas after eating. I went lactose free for awhile, but that didn't seem to clear up my intestinal issues. I must admit, I didn't know much about Celiac until recently (and still don't know a whole lot)
My symptoms became worse after being pregnant. I've been to the doctor's office more in the last year than in my entire life. My symptoms include (not sure if they're all related to Celiac or GI, but I'll list them anyway):

- Gas
- diarrhea
- bad toenails (ridges, pulling away, susceptible to fungus)
- dry/thin hair
- Infertility (IVF treatment to get pregnant)

And new symptoms since giving birth include:
- night sweats (not premenopausal, I was tested for that)
- vitamin D deficiant
- angular chelitis (cracks and rash on corners of mouth)
- UTI - bladder infections
- weight loss / muscle loss
- tingling in arms and hands
- breast pain/tenderness on my left side (mammogram was clear)
- bad tooth infection

I had been feeling like there was a new symptom daily. I am the full-time caretaker of my babies, so it's difficult to keep making dr appointments - I really just want to figure out what's going on. Friends, and even my OB have blamed a difficult pregnacy (bed-rest, pregnant with triplets), and say it probably just took a toll on my body. Some of my family members that have gone gluten free for GI issues, but to my knowledge no one has been oficially diagnosed Celiac. I decided to try it because I wasn't getting answers from doctors, and my sister claimed it helped with her sypmtoms. I am a few weeks in gluten free and notice some of my symptoms decreasing (night sweats and cracked lips mainly). I also am suspecting that my smallest daughter may have an issue as well (underweight, constipation, fussiness, and a rash on back of legs and front of elbows). since going gluten-free (3 weeks) her rashes have cleared up and her constipation is less.
In reading some posts, I see that some people suggest sticking with a gluten free diet if it's helping without diagnosis. I get that, but I feel like it's a lot of sacrificing (especially for my kids), if you don't know for sure. Now that I'm feeling better, I'm having a tough time deciding if going back on gluten to find out for sure is worth it. My sister mentioned DNA testing, and I'm wondering about pros and cons there. Sorry for the ramble, I'm just conflicted as to where to go from here.Thanks in advance!