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GlutenFreeIsTheBest

Member Since 06 Jan 2013
Offline Last Active Dec 22 2014 11:37 AM
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Topics I've Started

Wrigley Gum Cya Response Or Should I Avoid?

22 December 2014 - 11:41 AM

Anyone that is pretty sensitive have problems with Wrigley chewing gum? I'm trying to decode their response and determine if it is the typical CYA or if other gluten containing grains might be lurking.

 

Thanks!

 

 

 

Thank you for writing to inquire about ingredients used in Wrigley products.

 

All U.S. Wrigley products are labeled within strict compliance of applicable laws and FDA regulations, including the Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act of 2004.  Any materials identified as allergens within this Act (milk, eggs, fish, crustacean shellfish, tree nuts, peanuts, wheat, and soybeans) are labeled within the ingredient line.

 

The FDA has issued a proposed rule on gluten-free labeling, allowing food products containing less than 20 ppm of gluten (sourced from wheat, rye, barley, oats or cross-bred hybrids), to be considered gluten-free.  [Federal Register: January 23, 2007 (Volume 72, Number 14)]

 

All U.S. Wrigley chewing gum and confection products have been assessed to be gluten-free with the exception of the products listed below, which contain ingredient(s) derived from wheat or are made on shared equipment that also processes products with wheat and may contain trace amounts of gluten.  

 

Accordingly, these products are labeled as containing wheat-derived ingredients: 

 

  • Altoids® Smalls® Peppermint Mints (contains wheat maltodextrin which is stated in the ingredient line)
  • Lucas® and Skwinkles® Branded Candy Strips (contains wheat flour and wheat fiber which is stated in the ingredient line)

 

If your sensitivity extends to other types of gluten or if you are extremely sensitive to gluten sourced from wheat, rye, barley, oats or cross-bred hybrids, then you may want to consult with your physician prior to consuming our products.

 

We hope this information has been helpful.  If you have any additional questions or comments please feel free to contact us at 1-800-WRIGLEY Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. CST. 


This Journalist Obviously Knows Very Little About Gluten Free

11 February 2014 - 10:03 PM

I would love to comment on this article, but I don't have a facebook account.

 

http://www.10news.co...ten-free-021114

 

The article starts off like this...

 

"

It's the "in" thing -- virtually every possible product has a gluten-free option. There's gluten-free girl scout cookies, beer, gluten-free restaurant finders and even gluten-free dating sites.

"

 

If anyone has a facebook account and could comment, we should challenge this journalist to live 3 months on a strict gluten free diet, with all the cross-contamination concerns when eating out etc and then write an article after the experience!

 

I hate bad journalism.


Fogo De Chao

27 January 2014 - 03:45 PM

More of a rant here, sorry.

 

This is a great place to eat gluten free for a once in a while treat, but some staff isn't as well educated as they advertise they are.

 

Today they are offering a discounted rate and a free dessert. Three of the desserts were obvious gluten items, but the 4th item, Flan, I wasn't familiar with. So because of my unfamiliarity with Flan I began asking questions.

 

Previously I was told creme brulee was gluten free. Any cook could tell you there is no gluten containing ingredients in a basic creme brulee recipe, but we all know the rule...always assume there is gluten because it's the ridiculous things sometimes. I've eaten the creme brulee once before with no reaction. 

 

So called to make a reservation and asked if they would kindly substitute since it was gluten free. They had to ask a manager. Then she came back and said the only thing gluten free is the sorbet. ARGH! Called the corporate office and they weren't overly helpful...talked to 3 different people before finding the ingredients, which are exactly what one would expect cream brulee to have. (sugar, cream, vanilla, eggs)

 

So just a word of caution you may get different answers.

 

The bread they have is SOOO good and it's gluten free naturally due to the Tapioca flour they use. Most other items are gluten free, minus a few things, and the manager will personally walk you around the entire salad bar and tell you what has gluten and WHY! Couldn't have been more shocked the first time I went and the manager points to these chopped greens that looked like chopped parsley and said that's not gluten free because we put a small amount of bulger wheat in it or you can't have the chicken because it's marinated in beer without needing to explain the entire celiac bible.

 

So overall it's a great place to eat out for a once in a while treat, but beware their training practices are not as good as advertised and will leave you worried about putting food in your mouth.

 

What they told me was gluten free:

* All meats, exceptions below

* Cheese bread - did I say OMG yet?

* Most items on salad bar

 

What they told me is not gluten free: (not listing the totally obvious things)

* Chicken because it's marinated in beer and sausage

* The sausage is not made in house and they won't disclose what spices they use. The real kicker is the sausage comes on skewers bumped right up against the chicken...so that doesn't work. I have been told they would make some sausage special away from the chicken, but again it's one thing they can't be for sure on...so I assume it's a flour stick.

* The finely chopped green salad w/ bulgar wheat


Raw Milk And Lactose Intolerance Symptoms

21 January 2014 - 01:27 AM

Been meaning to post this for a long time...after going gluten free milk really bothered me; symptoms pointed to lactose intolerance which is common in celiacs.

 

Raw milk, which isn't available in all states, eliminated the symptoms milk was causing. Reading more on the internet shows this actually helps others with lactose intolerance because real cows milk (not pasteurized) has enzymes that help our bodies digest it.

 

Maybe this will help someone enjoy milk again.