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Emmpra

Member Since 21 Feb 2013
Offline Last Active Feb 22 2013 08:16 AM
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Topics I've Started

Suspected Ms, Can It Just Be Celiac. Please Help.

21 February 2013 - 09:08 PM

I am making this post on behalf of my girlfriend. She is currently being run through a variety of tests to determine if she has MS. Bloodwork, MRI, spinal tap. She has had a hard time not eating gluten products, and has it in spurts. She has been diagnosed with celiac disease since she was 17, suspected at 13, and is now 21. So she has continued eating gluten products since her diagnosis.
Her symptoms include:
Constant numbness in her limbs, with attacks of severe numbness and loss of control.
Difficulty Walking/legs giving out.
Difficulty with balance.
Active brain lesions in her white matter and spine.

Some vitamin deficiences, but we do not know the specifics.

She has had a spinal tap performed, but the results have not come back yet.

I have done some research and I have found that celiac disease can cause white matter lesions and spinal lesions, and all or most of these symptoms. I have not been able to find if celiac disease will cause a positive result for oligoclonal bands or antibodies in the CSF. I am very worried that her neurologist will continue to diagnose her disorder as MS, when her celiac disease (and ultimately malnourisment) has been presenting MS-like symptoms. She has told her neurologist that she had celiac disease, and the doctor had basically no reaction.

Can anyone provide any useful information or has had any similar situations where they were on a path to MS diagnosis, had lesions and everything... but it was ultimately a misdiagnosis?

As of right now she is on a gluten-free diet, and I am hoping that her symptoms cease. She has said that they have in the past. However the lesions may always be there, which her neurologist may not understand can also be caused by celiac disease.