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lhollamon

Member Since 26 Mar 2013
Offline Last Active Nov 22 2013 11:41 AM
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Topics I've Started

Gluten Challenge, Not Many Symptoms, Do We Scope?

22 November 2013 - 10:49 AM

Hi there, I have been searching these forums for days and thought I would just post to hopefully get some help.

 

Our son went gluten free about 9 months ago due to chronic diarrhea. After about two months we had normal stool diapers for the first time in his life. He is starting preschool now and basically its getting harder for us to justify keeping him on this diet without knowing for sure, so we decided to do the scope. He is scheduled for middle of December which will be 6 weeks back on gluten. So here is our dilemma. We started the gluten slowly per the doctor and its not been bad, he did have one night of full body hives and rash, which is not normal for him, and if anything his stool is actually MORE formed. His eczema is bad, but we just moved and the prior owners had a cat which he is allergic to, so I don't know what is causing what. Oh and he has had a bad cold for three weeks which just today turned into a sinus infection, not sure if that is related either.  We did do genetic testing before going gluten free and he has one of the genes and also a sensitivity gene..HELP?? What were your kids reactions on the challenge? Does it take a while? Should we scope?


2 Year Old With Crazy Enterolab Results, Desperate Mom

26 March 2013 - 03:42 PM

Please see the below results and any input in appreciated. It appears that he is reacting to EVERYTHING..we are definetly going to be cutting out gluten but how do we address the other issues? Is the fact that the gluten number a lot higher indicate that the gluten reaction is more severe? He has had a positive skin test to pork but it is showing as the least reactive? He also had a positive skin test to egg in the past but didnt at his last allergy appointment.

 

A + C) Comprehensive Gluten/Antigenic Food Sensitivity Stool Panel
(Combines Panels A and C at a discounted price)

Mean Value 11 Antigenic Foods      24 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-gliadin IgA      149 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-casein (cow’s milk) IgA      53 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-ovalbumin (chicken egg) IgA      36 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

Fecal Anti-soy IgA      45 Units   (Normal Range is less than 10 Units)

 

While all of the foods tested can be immune-stimulating, the hierarchy of reactions detected were as follows:

Food toward which you displayed most immunologic reactivity: Oat, Rice, Cashew, Corn
Food toward which you displayed intermediate reactivity: Walnut, Beef, Almond, Tuna
Food toward which you displayed least immunologic reactivity: Chicken, White potato, Pork

Within each class of foods to which you displayed multiple reactions, the hierarchy of those reactions detected were as follows:

Grains:
Grain toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Oat
Grain toward which you displayed intermediate immunologic reactivity: Rice
Grain toward which you displayed the least immunologic reactivity: Corn

Meats:
Meat toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Beef
Meat toward which you were next most immunologically reactive: Tuna
Meat toward which you displayed intermediate immunologic reactivity: Chicken
Meat toward which you displayed the least immunologic reactivity: Pork

Nuts:
Nut toward which you displayed the most immunologic reactivity: Cashew
Nut toward which you displayed intermediate immunologic reactivity: Walnut
Nut toward which you displayed the least immunologic reactivity: Almond

Nightshades:
You displayed immunologic reactivity to white potato, the member of the nightshade family usually consumed most often and in greatest quantities. While this does not necessarily mean you would react to all other nightshade foods (tomatoes, peppers, eggplant), it is possible. In the realm of elimination diets for immunologic disorders, nightshades are usually eliminated as the entire food class (i.e., all four previously mentioned foods in this class). This is especially important to the clinical setting of arthritis.

 

Thanks again!