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LauraTX

Member Since 13 Sep 2013
Online Last Active Today, 04:55 PM
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#924403 Most Ridiculous Gluten Comment I've Heard

Posted by LauraTX on 18 July 2014 - 06:47 PM

Actually, if you bring the grill to 600F or higher, and hold it there for 30 minutes, it will destroy the proteins on the grill. But if you have anything on the grill while you do that, it will no longer be edible. The clean cycle of a self-cleaning oven will do the same thing, burning off any gluten. FWIW.

Thats correct! 

 

At a restaurant one time I asked if there was a shared fryer, the nice girl there said yes, and even though a lady told her one time that she is a nurse and the hot oil burns off the gluten, she doesn't think it is safe.  I commended her for having some sense, and then told her that.  At the end I added, "Since the smoke point of the frying oil is well under 600 degrees, the gluten would only go away if the restaurant burned down."  Got a laugh out of that.  She still works there and I try to go on the days I know she usually works.   :)

 

 

Edit: Bad grammar


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#923799 Celiac Disease & Shiga Toxin E Coli

Posted by LauraTX on 14 July 2014 - 12:38 PM

If you have a verifiable bacteria that needs to be killed, please for your and public health interests, take the antibiotic.  It takes strong stuff to kill nasty germs like that, but you don't want that hanging around any longer than it has to.


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#923386 Boston- Four Thumbs Up!

Posted by LauraTX on 09 July 2014 - 09:13 PM

The picture of you son in a state of absolute joy just made my day.  I am so happy you guys had a good experience!!!  I want to go meet gluten rock stars now!!! LOL


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#922740 H- Pylori

Posted by LauraTX on 05 July 2014 - 10:32 PM

Hi Canuck,

I just wanted to add that it is pertinent to take all the medicine for the H Pylori eradication as prescribed, don't stop the antibiotics early.  If you choose to do some kind of alternative treatment, let your doctor know.  I highly recommend doing the recommended course of meds the doctor prescribed.


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#922308 Lower Left Abdominal Pain Unresolved

Posted by LauraTX on 01 July 2014 - 10:16 PM

Hi Salaw, and welcome to the forum!  Do you have Celiac disease?  As for your lower left abdominal pain, since you have ruled out female issues, the likely cause is gas or constipation.  There are two bends in the colon in that area (see this pic:http://img.webmd.com...pages/colon.jpg) and if you are prone to constipation, things can get hung up around there.  You can rule out gas by taking some gas-x and seeing if it helps.  If it doesn't, it may help you to do things to improve the flow of things, there is a ton of information on the internet about help with constipation, but make improvements in your diet before you try medicine or any natural remedies.


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#922083 Contamination Anxiety- Help!

Posted by LauraTX on 30 June 2014 - 12:24 PM

AFitGirl:

 

I know some will disagree with me, but I am not quite as "anal" about possibly ingesting small amounts of gluten.  I do agree that you should be anal about avoiding foods that are likely to contain more than 20 ppm gluten content.  I was diagnosed with Celiac's 2 years ago. I do react to significant amounts of gluten, but I am not as severely sensitive as some.  For those that are severely sensitive, they do need to be very anal to avoid symptoms.

 

I have read that one research test program showed that 10 mg of gluten did not damage intestines of adults with celiacs in the program and that 50 mg of gluten did damage intestines.  So "a few molecules of gluten" may not be harmful, but you do need to minimize your gluten intake.

 

I am not as concerned about cross-contamination as some.  I try to take reasonable precautions, but I don't get paranoid about eating in restaurants or buying prepared foods that don't "guarantee" a gluten-free facility.  I do check all labels for ingredients and will not typically buy items that list products known to contain gluten. But I do consume Kikkoman soy sauce and Corona beer occasionally - both were shown in previous tests to contain less than 20 ppm million gluten, even though wheat or barley is used to produce them.  (I have read that the processing they use destroys much of the gluten.) 

 

For every meal I order at a restaurant, I do ask if the meal contains any gluten or wheat flour.  I previously had made the mistake of not asking when I thought a meal I often eat would be gluten free - but I then found that some restaurants do use gluten in the meal.  (In the past year I had two severe glutenings when I forgot to ask.)  So now I always ask.

 

So, yes you do need to always be "vigilant".  But you may not need to be "anal".

 

Redbeard52

 

 

While the over the top approach may not be necessary for everyone, I think your approach consuming corona and regular kikkoman is unwise.  Although you may not feel it, purposefully ingesting gluten containing products does harm you in the long run.  I urge you to re-think what you are doing.  You don't have to get outright glutening symptoms from something for it to cause damage in the small intestine.  A few molecules of gluten is not going to be what is transmitted through cross contamination, it is generally going to be much more, since even a tiny speck of wheat flour is much larger than a few molecules.

 

On the forum here we only support the spread of information from legitimate sources, and there is no science to support a person with Celiac disease purposefully eating gluten. 


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#922012 Anxiety And Bloating Still Happening After Going gluten-free? Help!

Posted by LauraTX on 29 June 2014 - 08:11 PM

Welcome, nooblet! :D

 

A lot of people are misdiagnosed before actually getting a Celiac diagnosis, sadly.  Did your doctor tell you how bad your damage was on the endoscopy?  (May have said something like Marsh 1, Marsh 2, Marsh 3, Marsh 4, blunted villi, etc.)  Overall, the damage in your gut takes a long time to heal.  It can be months before you see changes, and longer if the initial damage was very bad, but it is totally worth it to stick it out. 

 

1) If you are still having stomach issues, try out avoiding dairy for a while, since a lot of Celiacs cannot handle dairy with all that damage going on in there.( http://www.curecelia...ose-intolerance)  Same thing with oats since they have a lot of fiber and stuff, many GI doctors will tell you to avoid them for three months.  ( http://www.celiaccen...uten-free-oats/  )

 

2) Pain in the upper right abdomen like you describe are classic signs of gallbladder issues.  If after a few months of being gluten-free that doesn't seem to be better, have your GI doctor look into that. 

 

3) As you seem to know, emotional issues definitely are associated with Celiac.  That, along with the gut healing, will take a bit of time.  I am sure the stress of the diagnosis process and learning how to eat again don't help with the stress.  Just try to reduce your stress level as much as you can and stick it out a while longer.  

 

Overall, you are just barely into your healing.  Especially with you likely having had active Celiac for 10+ years, it is going to take a while for your body to recover from the damage.  Not ten years though, thankfully :)  Just be very strict with the gluten-free diet for now, avoid eating out, and try to eat healthy stuff so your body gets all the good stuff it needs to thrive.  Eventually you will hit a point where you do feel better, and feeling better will also help with your anxiety.  If you haven't already, check out this thread for newbies:  http://www.celiac.co...ewbie-info-101/ and feel free to ask any other questions you may have! :)


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#921746 How Do You Work With This?

Posted by LauraTX on 26 June 2014 - 11:26 PM

What flavor of Talenti Gelato did you eat?  They only have a few that are basically fruit sorbettos that don't contain dairy.  Also, many glutino products have dairy in them.  Before you look into anything like the carb issue, you may want to eliminate oats for a time as Adalaide said, since some Celiacs cannot handle them, even after healing.  Also, be very careful and picky about trace amounts of dairy in products you eat.  A good company for dairy free frozen desserts is the SO Delicious brand which makes coconut milk ice cream.  

 

But do remember that even though us Celiacs have bona fide issues with gluten, not all our issues are caused by it.  It really sounds like you have some other intolerance that has yet to be treated through diet.


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#921402 Anyone Ever Been Glutened By Ground Beef?

Posted by LauraTX on 24 June 2014 - 12:23 AM

Pure ground beef is gluten free.  However, once you start sharing facilities such as a butcher case, like the one at a grocery store near me where I do not patronize the butcher case because they have the breaded patties next to everything else, and they carry it over the plain meat.  Anywhere you go where employees need to be doing the right thing for food safety can be potentially unsafe when people do not do their job right.  It is the same reason why you are more likely to suffer from foodborne illness at a restaurant.  I read a recent study that said even though they are ran by professionals who know what to do to prevent foodborne illness, it generally comes down to people just not doing their job like not washing their hands after going to the bathroom, etc.

 

You just have to use your best judgement in all situations.  If your local grocer has a shady dirty looking butcher counter, and you can't see the back area or you can see it and it is filthy, you really shouldn't buy anything there, LOL.


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#919898 Isn't Baking Soda And Powder Gluten Free?

Posted by LauraTX on 11 June 2014 - 11:48 AM

Thank you, that is appreciated :)


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#919763 Celiac And Pediatric Hearing Loss - Does It Improve?

Posted by LauraTX on 10 June 2014 - 02:57 PM

Definitely get her into an ENT as well as the audiologist.  There IS such a thing as autoimmune hearing loss, you can ask for her to be tested for the antibodies since she already has a history of autoimmune problems.

 

Here is a good page on it:   http://american-hear...aied/#diagnosed

 

When I was a teenager, one of the many symptoms of my autoimmune problems (I have celiac and lupus) was unexplained sensorineural hearing loss.  I went to more than one specialist for it, and almost was to the point of needing a hearing aid.  When my lupus diagnosis came up, I mentioned the unexplained hearing loss to my rheumatologist, and soon after I found out that my Anti Collagen type 2 antibodies were sky high.  They have decreased with my lupus treatment (Celiac and lupus were dx around the same time so I can't exactly attribute things to just one disease easily) and a few months ago, I had my hearing tested again and it has IMPROVED.  I went from "Well, maybe there is a deaf person in your family, you should be prepared for this to become more severe and a significant disability" to normal hearing for a person my age.

 

When I asked my ENT specialist why he hadn't tested me for autoimmune hearing loss, even when he was at a complete loss as to what was causing my hearing problems, he said autoimmune hearing loss is so rare it isn't even in the scope of what they are looking at.  So push to get everything thoroughly checked out for your daughter.


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#918568 Overdoing It

Posted by LauraTX on 31 May 2014 - 03:23 PM

I also have lupus and celiac.  The tiredness and it being really easy to overdo it is a classic symptom of lupus.  Any time I need to get a lot of stuff done, I have to be extremely careful to not overdo myself.  I have been attempting to get into better physical shape and lose some weight, but I have to be very very careful about not overdoing physical activity.  Basically, I can't do a hard workout, and whatever light activity I do, as soon as I start feeling a little bit of burn, I have to stop.  If I don't, I am in bed ill for days.

 

The fight against lupus is all about increasing your good days and decreasing your bad days, but there will definitely be bad days.  Make sure you tell your rheumatologist about any seemingly minor changes in symptoms.  Also, the lupus meds take a long time to work, so you just gotta hang in there.  But the best thing you can do for yourself is know your limits, not just immediate limits, but how much you can do one day without being ill the next.  Remember that lupus is a disease that runs itself with inflammation, so it takes a bit for any lupus body freakouts (as I like to call them) to set in, and takes longer for them to fizzle out.

 

And of course, taking care of all your autoimmune problems at once helps a lot.  So controlling the celiac will help the lupus, and vice versa.


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#917780 Igg Against Ttg 18 Month Old Babies Results....

Posted by LauraTX on 25 May 2014 - 07:41 PM

Hi Brit16,

You probably haven't gotten many replies because your child is so young and his doctor has done the right thing by referring you to a specialist.  At this point it will just be a wait to get further testing done by the specialist.  Let us know what happens.

 

Edit: And yes, as mentioned above, do not discontinue feeding him gluten yet.


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#916828 Who Needs A Dexa Scan?

Posted by LauraTX on 20 May 2014 - 04:02 PM

I had a DEXA scan ordered by my rheumatologist in December because of my lupus + celiac + long term steroid use.  I think the imaging place did a pre approval on it, so you can ask the facility they send you to if they do pre-approvals first to prevent any trouble.


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#916656 Bakery Pipe Explosion Covers Home In Flour- Every Celiac's Worst Nightmar...

Posted by LauraTX on 19 May 2014 - 12:16 PM

An elderly lady that lives next to a bakery got her house covered in flour when a pipe burst.  All I could think of while reading it is THAT would be my worst nightmare, just burn the house down, please!

 

http://www.nj.com/bu...t_river_default


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