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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes

  • Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/05/2018 - While people with non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) have neither celiac disease nor wheat allergy (WA), they often do have intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms that are related to gluten consumption.
    Using a double-blind placebo-controlled (DBPC) gluten challenge with crossover, a team of researchers recently set out to conduct the first assessment of NCGS rates in children with chronic, gluten-associated gastrointestinal symptoms.
    The research team included R Francavilla MD, PhD, F Cristofori MD, L Verzillo MD, A Gentile MD, S Castellaneta MD, C Polloni MD, V Giorgio MD, E Verduci MD, PhD, E D'Angelo MD, S Dellatte MD & F Indrio MD. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Pediatrics, San Paolo Hospital, Bari Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, Santa Maria del Carmine Hospital, Rovereto TN, Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, Catholic University, Rome, Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, University of Milan, S. Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy; the Department of Pediatrics, Santa Maria Incoronata dell’Olmo Hospital; Cava dei Tirreni SA, Italy; the Tandoi Group Factory, Corato, Italy; and the Interdisciplinary Department of Medicine-Pediatric Section, University of Bari, Bari, Italy.
    Their team looked at 1,114 children with chronic gastrointestinal symptoms, but no celiac disease and WA. For children showing a positive connection between symptoms and gluten ingestion, the team offered a four-stage diagnostic challenge that included: run-in, open gluten-free diet (GFD) and DBPC crossover gluten challenge.
    Patients randomly received gluten (10 g/daily) and placebo (rice starch) for 2 weeks each, separated by a washout week. The gluten challenge was considered positive when accompanied by a minimum 30% decrease of global visual analogue scale between gluten and placebo.
    Out of 1,114 children, 96.7% showed no correlation with gluten ingestion. Thirty-six children were eligible for the diagnostic challenge. After the run-in and open GFD, 28 patients underwent gluten challenge. Eleven of these children tested positive (39.2%).
    This is the first such study to demonstrate the need for a DBPC for diagnosing NCGS in children, since the diagnosis is ruled out in more than sixty-percent of cases.
    Source:
    The American Journal of Gastroenterology. doi:10.1038/ajg.2017.483

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/03/2018 - Want to score major points with your beloved? This loving, gluten-free twist on Toad in a Hole will have you thanking your handsome prince all over again. All you need is a heart-shaped cut-out to make your gluten-free dieter feel the love of this classic breakfast favorite.
    Ingredients:
    2 large eggs 2 slices gluten-free white sandwich bread 4 teaspoons mayonnaise 1 tablespoon butter salt pepper Finely chopped fresh parsley, dill, or chives Directions:
    Spread mayonnaise on both sides of 2 slices white sandwich bread.
    With medium heart-shaped cookie cutter, cut centers from bread.
    In 12-inch skillet, melt butter on medium. Add bread (and centers) to skillet.
    Cook 5 minutes or until golden brown, and then turn the bread over.
    To each heart-shaped hole, add 1 large egg; sprinkle eggs with pinch of salt and pepper.
    Reduce heat to medium-low. Cook 5 to 7 minutes, or until whites are set.
    Sprinkle with finely chopped parsley or chives, as desired.

    Yvonne (Vonnie) Mostat
    Celiac.com 03/02/2018 - When I was diagnosed as having celiac disease with severe dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) I was told that the diet was difficult to follow and I would have to be vigilant or Dapsone would not relieve the itching. I suffered abdominal pain, outbreaks of sores, anaemia, and, (big swallow) the horrible bowel disorders. I came out of the dermatologist's office with a prescription for Dapsone to treat the attack of sores on my scalp, on my arms and thighs, along with a slip of paper referring me to the dietician at our local hospital. But that was years ago. My journey has been an ongoing trial of trial and error.
    I was just discharged from hospital again, my third occasion in ICU within the past year. I have been told I am the only person in Langley who can wear that crown, the one of having Methemoglobinemia. {lucky me!}
    This could happen to any celiac with dermatitis herpetiformis who takes Dapsone. And anyone regularly eating packaged meats or bacon, for instance, along with having Zylocaine injections, is at significant risk of methemoglobinemia as well. A person with celiac disease may or may not have dermatitis herpetiformis. Many celiacs go their entire lives without a DH spot on their bodies {you Lucky people}.
    I have learned a lot in this past two weeks, both while hospitalized and from subsequent research, about the reasons it happened and the dangers of it happening to me again. I can never have more than one Dapsone again and I must now have methemoglobinemia tests done every six weeks. It is likely that they cannot use Methylene Blue to treat me again, unless I am at a critical point, because of the danger of the poison still being in my system.
    **A little lesson here on methemoglobinemia:
    Hemoglobin is the molecule in red blood cells that distributes oxygen to the body.
    Methhemoglobinemia can either be inherited or acquired. It is a blood disorder in which an abnormal amount of methemoglobin, a form of hemoglobin, is produced. Methemoglobin cannot release oxygen.
    There are two forms of Methemoglobinemia. The acquired form is caused by exposure to some chemicals and/or drugs and is thought to be more common than those that are inherited.
    Chemicals and drugs that trigger methhemoglobinemia include:
    Anaesthetics such as benzocaine and Xylocaine Benzene Certain antibiotics {including Dapsone and chloroquine} Moi! Nitrites {used as additives to prevent meat from spoiling)!! There are two sub-groups of inherited methemoglobinemia, type 1 and type 2.
    The symptoms of acquired methemoglobinemia include:
    bluish coloring of the skin headache fatigue I did not get "bluish coloring of the skin", even though I was hospitalized on three occasions with this condition and was asked about it repeatedly. I did get full frontal, severe headaches, and I did experience breathlessness when climbing stairs. I had to stop at the top of our the stairs in our home to catch my breath. My most recent admission to the Emergency Department was after such an experience. I was really out of breath, had chest pain, and my headache was so severe that I told my husband that I thought that methemoglobinemia was coming back again.
    I made the mistake of following a physician's instructions - some don't seem to know that this condition can become critical.
    The admissions last year were because I had two of the diagnostic criteria for Type II methemoglobinemia. I had a trapped nerve in my neck and my husband had been trained to give me Zylocaine injections to alleviate severe stabbing pains just above my right eyebrow. (The nerve travels over the head to just above the eye.)
    I had been told that when I was in the throes of a dermatitis herpetiformis outbreak I could go 5 - 4 - 3 - 2 - 1 with Dapsone and Prednisone. On the first day I took 5 tablets, the second day 4 tablets, and so on. If the spots kept re-occurring then I was to follow the same procedure once more.
    When I was discharged last year I was not told to change that protocol. In February, I found myself inundated with dermatitis herpetiformis spots all over the back of my head, backs of my arms and shins. I was conservative in my approach to Dapsone and took only Three Dapsone tablets on two successive days.
    This set me on the path to another hospital admission. I could not climb our stairs without leg pains and becoming breathless. I had frontal headaches and just "did not feel well".
    On one of my last admissions to the intensive care unit, my methemoglobinemia was 29 and the Internist treating me said that if I had sat at home with my oxygen bottle for another week my methemoglobinemia scale could have climbed to 35 which usually means death.
    What to do if you develop the same symptoms: Call your health care provider or emergency services (911) immediately if you have severe shortness of breath and you have previously experienced methemoglobinemia.
    Prevention: Genetic counseling is recommended for couples with a family history of methemoglobinemia who are considering having children.
    After this most recent outbreak of DH I was determined to find out what had caused this last admission to hospital. It was not fun to have my blood drawn daily. Neither was it fun to have the phlebotomist coming in to draw blood gases from my wrist (ouch!) also daily. It was scary when they told me that my hemoglobin was declining daily and when it hit 80 they started the IV drip of two units of packed red cells again.
    They did not do the Methylane Blue flushing during this admission because my methemoglobin was 11, not 17 or 29. Methylane Blue is a poison and they had to check with St. Paul's Hospital in Vancouver in order to determine the amount to be used on this little body. Plus they cannot keep doing this poisonous flushing every nine months. I was told this by a specialist wearing his sternest facial expression, obviously in order to scare me.
    Who knows what amounts still stay in the system? Methylene blue may be dangerous to patients who have or may be at risk for a blood disease called G68PD deficiency and should not be used by them. If you or your child has G6PD deficiency, always tell your health care provider before receiving treatment.
    Another interesting note is that ascorbic acid can also be used to reduce the level of methemoglobin. I don't know much ascorbic acid is required but I intend to find out. Oranges contain ascorbic acid do they not? The normal methemoglobinemia scale is about minus 0.1. Mine seems to stay at about 3.
    This specialist physician also told me that I could no longer increase my dosage of Dapsone. It has to stay at one per day no matter how severe the outbreak. I must also take Cimetidine, a drug that is usually used to control excess stomach acid. It helps to reduce the impact of Dapsone on methemoglobin.
    Dapsone is the dangerous drug for methemoglobinemia, and Zylocaine injections also pose similar dangers. After my admission to hospital last May, I found out that phosphates can also add to the level of methemoglobin. There are phosphates in packaged meats, with lots of those little guys in bacon and cured ham. Were I to double up on Dapsone because of a particularly bad DH outbreak, have a few injections of Zylocaine, then add some back bacon and packaged cold cuts, I might well be back in hospital with elevated levels of methemoglobin.
    This time I also discovered that phosphates are sometimes in chewing gum, malted milk drinks, drinking chocolate, baked beans, instant coffee, curry powder, white pepper, some lipsticks, gravy browning, self basting turkeys, brown rice syrup, supplements and, of course, luncheon meats.
    Fifteen years ago I was told I could use Atarax for the itch. Now they tell me that this drug is not only very sedating, thus slowing the heart down considerably, it is a poison that can cause tardive dyskinesia, a potentially irreversible form of brain damage. Again, fifteen years ago it caused me to experience facial gesticulations, tongue protrusion, hands that trembled and a speech pattern that often defied translation. That was because I was wrongly prescribed Loxapine for the itch, and along with Atarax, it ruined my life forever.
    Misunderstandings persist. Celiac disease can look like Crohn's disease. It can look like colitis. It can look like irritable bowel disease, and because physicians have been taught that celiac disease is very rare and they often simply write it off as irritable bowel syndrome when they cannot find the cause of a GI problem. They forget that it could be celiac disease. It is just under-diagnosed, and peri-menopausal women suffer the most because they are often labeled as "depressive", or worse yet, "neurotic". I was told when working as a nurse that "irritable bowel" often meant "we just don't know".
    The world has yet to define a universal "gluten-free" standard. For international trade purposes, the Codex (WHO - World Health Organization), Committee on Nutrition and Foods for Special Dietary Uses is in the process of revising their standards. At this time they are unable to reach a consensus. {Hey, this has been since 2008 and it's already 2012! What do they do at these Forums?} The Food Allergen Labeling and Consumer Protection Act (FALCPA) has committed to defining "gluten-free" for labeling purposes by 2008. We still do not have a World standard. FDA (Food and Drug Administration) acknowledges that the situation needs to be rectified and it has made a start by including gluten with other major allergens in their ingredient disclosure requirements.
    The greatest progress is among the health declarations on restaurant menus and whole foods markets. Wal-Mart have also cast their lot with this group, establishing entire sections dedicated to gluten-free foods. We are finally starting to get rid of ‘stealth glutens' - those in flavor carriers, binders, fillers and emulsifiers, and used in everything from salad dressings to self-basting turkeys. We have come a long way, but we still have miles to go in reforming the food industry. As a waiter said to my friend when she told him she has celiac disease: "We don't serve fish in our restaurant, in fact we have nothing out of the sea".
    References:
    DeBaun, MR - Frei-Jones M Vichinsky E Hereditary methemoglobinemia in Kliegmann RM, Behrmann RE, Jenson HB, Stanton BF, eds. Nelson Textbook of Pediatrics 19th ed. Philadelphia. PA Saunders, Fernandez Frackelton M Bocock, J. Cyanosis In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, et al, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine Concepts and Clinical Practice 7th ed. Philadelphia, Pa, Mosby Elsevier; 2009, chap, 29. "Keeping Food Safety in the Mix: Food Safety in Grain Based Foods and Bakery Products" Gluten-Free Formulation, Kim Decker

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/01/2018 - Mortality rates for children under five have been falling steadily for decades. Additionally, there's plenty of data to indicate that rates of celiac disease have been rising in general population.
    Before doctors understood the role that gluten played in celiac disease, the prognosis for young children with the condition was grim. Since doctors didn't understand the underlying disease, many of these deaths were simply logged as deaths due to wasting or failure to thrive. Could fewer children dying from celiac disease help explain the apparent rise in celiac rates? In an attempt to answer that question, a team of researchers recently set out to to investigate a possible relationship between mortality rates in children under five years old and rates of celiac disease.
    The research team included F Biagi, A Raiteri, A Schiepatti, C Klersy, and GR Corazza. They are variously affiliated with the First Department of Internal Medicine, Coeliac Centre, and the Biometry and Clinical Epidemiology, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, University of Pavia, Pavia, Italy.
    A review of medical literature revealed 27 studies from 17 different countries concerning rates of celiac disease in schoolchildren between 1995 and 2011, 4 studies were performed in Italy. The researchers conducted a meta-analysis of prevalence rates and compared them between specific country under-5 mortality groups, publication year, and age.
    Over the last twenty years or so, mortality rates for kids under 5 have been decreasing all over the world. This reduction has mirrored an increase of the rates of celiac disease. The Spearman correlation coefficient was -63%, 95% confidence interval -82% to -33% (P < 0.001). The data show that higher mortality rates mirrored lower rates of celiac disease. This finding is confirmed by the meta-analysis of the four Italian studies.
    Rates of death for children under 5 years of age seem to influence rates of celiac disease in the general population. Basically, less kids dying young contributes to higher celiac disease rates later on.
    Because gluten-free diet treatment and numerous other developments allow a better survival of children with celiac disease, the number of people with celiac disease will likely increase for some time into the future.
    Source:
    J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2018 Feb;66(2):289-294. doi: 10.1097/MPG.0000000000001696.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/28/2018 - In an effort to discover more genes that trigger type 1 diabetes, a team of researchers recently conducted a large, prospective study of children at risk for type 1 diabetes. The end goal is to reveal more targets for treating or even preventing the disease.
    The research team included A Sharma, X Liu, D Hadley, W Hagopian, WM Chen, S Onengut-Gumuscu, C Törn, AK Steck, BI Frohnert, M Rewers, AG Ziegler, Å Lernmark, J Toppari, JP Krischer, B Akolkar, SS Rich, JX She; and TEDDY Study Group.
    The team identified six new chromosomal regions in young people who have already developed type 1 diabetes, or who have started making antibodies against their insulin-producing cells, often a step toward full-blown diabetes that requires lifelong insulin therapy. Their analysis of 5,806 individuals, which is published in the Journal of Autoimmunity, also confirms three regions already associated with one of those related conditions.
    The team observed two top autoantibodies. The first, called IAA, acts directly against insulin. The second, called GADA, acts against the enzyme glutamate decarboxylase, which regulates the insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. According to Dr. She, about 90 percent of patients with type 1 diabetes start with one of the autoantibodies, and many patients eventually end up with both. The second autoantibody may surface in a few days or even years later.
    They began this study with 176,586 SNPs, or single nucleotide polymorphisms. Nucleotides are basic building blocks of our genetic information. According to Sharma, the SNPs evaluated by TEDDY scientists were already linked with other autoimmune conditions like rheumatoid arthritis or celiac disease, but not type 1 diabetes.
    The researchers figured out which of these SNPs are different in TEDDY participants with type 1 diabetes versus those with Islet cell autoantibodies versus those with neither. Previous research has shown that the genes associated with IA and actual type 1 diabetes can differ. Dr. She says that even though clinicians regard Islet cell autoantibodies (IA) as a red flag for type 1 diabetes, not every child with IA goes on to develop diabetes, though multiple autoantibodies definitely increase that risk.
    The team notes that it is possible that the genes that promote IA development may differ from those that lead to full-blown disease progression.
    She says that this is the first study of gene identification for any disease to use this sort of longitudinal information. She add that this and other studies by the TEDDY research group help to clarify the search for important non-HLA genes by adding the "time to disease" perspective.
    Source:
    J Autoimmun. 2018 Jan 5. pii: S0896-8411(17)30739-4. doi: 10.1016/j.jaut.2017.12.008.  
    The researchers are variously affiliated with the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA; Division of Biostatistics and Data Science, Department of Population Health Sciences, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, US; the Health Informatics Institute, Morsani College of Medicine, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL, USA; the Division of Population Health Sciences and Education, St George's University of London, London, United Kingdom; the Pacific Northwest Research Institute, Seattle, WA, USA; the Center for Public Health Genomics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA, USA; the Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University/CRC, Malmö, Sweden; the Barbara Davis Center for Childhood Diabetes, University of Colorado, Denver, Aurora, CO, USA; the Institute of Diabetes Research, Helmholtz Zentrum München, Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; Forschergruppe Diabetes e.V., Munich-Neuherberg, Germany; the Department of Pediatrics, Turku University Hospital, Turku, Finland; the National Institutes of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Disorders, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD, USA; and the Center for Biotechnology and Genomic Medicine, Medical College of Georgia, Augusta University, Augusta, GA, USA.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/27/2018 - A pair of disabled veterans recently filed a federal lawsuit against a gluten-free bakery, Aimee's Love, and the city of Longmont, Colorado. The suit claims that on two separate occasions the bakery owners and the city both violated the Americans with Disabilities Act when they refused to serve the couple due to the presence of their service dogs.
    The suit also contends that Aimee's Love violated the Colorado Anti-Discrimination Act, and that the city violated the Rehabilitation Act of 1973. The Blocks are seeking unspecified damages. Under the ADA, people with disabilities may bring animals into businesses and other buildings where they would usually be excluded.
    The Blocks allege that they were first denied service by the bakery on March 8, when they attempted to enter with a Great Dane named Rajah, which they term a "service animal in training." The Blocks claim they asked the owners to familiarize themselves with federal laws regarding service animals. They claim that they were later denied service a second time, when they tried to enter the bakery with a different dog.
    According to Jennifer and Gary Block, Longmont police officers responded to the second incident improperly by wrongly making the couple and their dog leave the business. A Longmont police report claims the couple left on their own after the first incident, and that the bakery owners merely asked if the dogs were legitimate service dogs.
    It was during the second incident that the police told the Blocks and their dog to leave the bakery, the suit alleges. The suit also contends that the bakery owners and police violated federal disability law by demanding "proof" that the Blocks' dog was indeed a service animal.
    Under federal law, business owners may ask if a dog is a service animal and what task it performs, but can't ask any further questions of the dog's handler. They are not allowed to ask for "proof" that the service animal is "legitimate."
    Stay tuned for more news on this and other gluten-free-related stories.
    Read more at: Timescall.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/26/2018 - People with celiac disease and gluten-sensitivities react adversely to gluten proteins in wheat, barley and rye. The gold standard for assessing gluten levels in foods is a test called the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, aka ELISA. Now, ELISA is, by most measures, a good test. However, it does have some drawbacks.
    ELISA tests do vary by manufacturer, and can provide inconsistent results, including false negatives, which can be harmful for people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity.
    Also, for optimal detection, each type of gluten requires a different ELISA. So, barley, wheat and rye all require separate tests.
    Researchers Kevin D. Dorfman, Scott P. White and C. Daniel Frisbie claim they have developed a gluten detector that can rapidly detect and quantify different sources of gluten with a single test.
    Their team says that their gluten assay device is based on floating gate transistor technology, and relies on tiny micro-channels for a sample to move through. Gluten in a sample will bind to one of three capture agents, which can be antibodies or a DNA-based aptamer, that specifically latch onto gluten proteins from certain sources. This binding causes a shift in the voltage read-out of the transistor which acts as a chemical fingerprint that identifies the gluten as being from barley, wheat, or rye.
    As with ELISA, the device could detect gluten below 20 parts per million, which is the maximum threshold allowed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for a "gluten-free" label. Because it has fewer processing steps, and uses automated sampling, the new sensor typically produces results 45 minutes faster due than ELISA tests.
    The new test is still in development, and not set to replace ELISA anytime soon. But progress in the gluten-free world is rapid these days, so changes to commercial gluten detection systems are likely on the near future.
    Source:
    American Chemical Society

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/24/2018 - Forget about Valentine's Day. Well, not literally, you should definitely do something nice for your Valentine; but let's put that aside for a moment. Just about any day can be right for a romantic dinner if you plan ahead and keep it simple. One suggestion: fondue.
    Few dishes can so effortlessly anchor a simple, romantic dinner as traditional Swiss fondue. Yes, you could make your own fondue, but I prefer to make it easy by dropping by my local Trader Joe's.
    Made in Switzerland, Trader Joe's Fondue is a blend of Swiss Emmental and Gruyère cheeses, white wine, kirsch, a dry cherry brandy, and a selection of savory spices.
    Trader Joe's also make a French version called Isigny Ste Mère Fondue Normande, which is made with soft cheeses Camembert, Livarot, and Pont L'Eveque cheeses and apple brandy.
    Want my recipe for the easiest, most romantic gluten-free dinner I know?
    Lightly steam some broccoli, asparagus, carrots, zucchini, potatoes until tender, but firm. Cut them into bite-sized chunks and arrange on a plate. Also add cut apples, pears, some toasted gluten-free bread, and some good ham or sausage.
    Grab a box of Trader Joe's Fondue, and prepare as directed. If you don't have a fondue pot, you can still heat the fondue in the microwave and serve it a ramekin or other ceramic dish. The ceramic will hold the heat well, and help keep the fondue fit for dipping.
    Spread out on a blanket near the fireplace, and if you don't have a fireplace, turn on one of those fireplace videos on YouTube.
    Pour a glass of your favorite wine, dig in, and enjoy your lingering, romantic dinner.
    If you don't have a Trader Joe's nearby, or feeling DIY? Fret not. Here's a great recipe recipe for an easy gluten-free beer and cheddar fondue.

    Gluten-Free Beer and Cheddar Fondue
    Ingredients:
    12 ounces light gluten-free beer ½ teaspoon Dijon mustard 1 clove garlic ¼ teaspoon Gluten-free Louisiana-style hot sauce 4 cups shredded sharp Cheddar cheese 2 tablespoons cornstarch or potato starch Cooked sausage or ham, cut to bite-size New potatoes, steamed and cut to size Gluten-free Bread, toasted and cut into cubes Apples cut into bite-size squares Pear cut into bite-size squares broccoli cauliflower asparagus carrots zucchini Directions:
    Heat beer, Dijon mustard, garlic, and hot sauce in 4-quart saucepan on low; whisk in Cheddar cheese tossed with cornstarch until melted and smooth. Pour into a warm ramekin or other ceramic dish.
    Lightly steam some broccoli, cauliflower, asparagus, carrots, zucchini, potatoes until tender, but firm. Cut into bite-sized chunks and arrange on a plate.
    Add cut apples, pears, toasted gluten-free bread, and good ham or sausage.
    To serve, spear fruit, veggies or meat with a fork and dip in cheese. Eat and repeat.

    Jefferson Adams
    Want to make an easy, but memorable dinner that will be as romantic as it is delicious? Then this tasty roast duck is just the ticket. In many parts of the world, Europe and Asia especially, it's quite common to eat duck. This recipe will blends white wine with fresh apricots and pineapple to create a delicious sauce that is perfect for this nicely roasted duck.
    Ingredients:
    1 large duck breast
    1 pound parsnips
    1 cups chicken broth
    3 teaspoon olive oil
    ½ small red onion
    ½ cups dry white wine
    ¼ cups fresh apricots
    ¼ cups chopped pineapple (canned okay, drained)
    1 tabelspoon apricot jam
    1 tablespoon red wine vinegar
    Chopped flat leaf parsley
    Directions:
    Heat oven to 400 degrees F. Line small jelly-roll pan with foil.
    Place duck on cutting board. Cover with plastic wrap. Use a meat mallet to pound breast to 1-inch thickness.
    Use a knife to score the breast with ¼-inch-deep cuts diagonally across skin side, about ½ inch apart. Make another set of cuts to create diamond pattern.
    In a medium sauce pot, heat parsnips and broth to simmering on medium-high. Reduce heat to medium. Partially cover and simmer until very tender, about 15 minutes.
    In a skillet, heat 1 teaspoon oil on medium. Sprinkle duck with ¼ teaspoon each salt and pepper to season both sides. Add duck to skillet, skin side down. Cook 5 minutes or until crisp and browned. Turn over. Cook another 2 minutes or until browned.
    Transfer to prepared pan, skin side up. Roast 5 to 7 minutes or until desired doneness (145 degrees F for medium). Transfer to clean cutting board and loosely tent with foil.
    Drain all but 1 teaspoon fat from skillet. Add onion to skillet.
    Cook on medium 2 minutes or until browned, stirring frequently.
    Add wine pineapple and apricots. Cook 2 minutes or until wine is reduced by about half.
    Stir in jam, vinegar, and â…› teaspoon each salt and pepper. Cook 1 minute or until jam is melted, stirring frequently. Remove from heat.
    With slotted spoon, transfer cooked parsnips to food processor along with ¼ cup cooking liquid, remaining 2 teaspoons oil, and â…› teaspoon salt. Pulse just until smooth.
    Divide parsnips between 2 serving plates. Thinly slice duck breast; arrange duck on top of parsnips. Top with apricot sauce and garnish with parsley, if desired.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/23/2018 - A quest to brew gluten-free beer from chestnuts that started as a lark and developed into an obsession has resulted in a proper, award-winning lager.
    Christchurch brewer Hamish Jones will tell you that his quest to brew gluten-free beer from chestnuts began about six years ago, in an effort to please beer-loving cousin with celiac disease. A few years later, in 2016, Jones started The Nuts Brewing Co., and Jones' Cheslic Lager was born.
    Cheslic is a naturally crafted chestnut lager. Recently this unique brew won the Morton Coutts Trophy, presented by the Brewers Guild for outstanding innovation or achievement in the NZ brewing industry.
    Judges commended Jones' innovation in creating a beer that "appeals to a growing section of society who have been deprived of beer and forced to drink only wine and cider".
    "Although chestnuts have been used as an adjunct in beer for some time, the use of them without any barley, to produce a gluten-free beer on a commercial scale, is a worldwide first and furthermore the nuts are locally grown," the trophy citation said.
    Jones said that, even though brewing with chestnuts was a fickle business, the resulting product is "not as bitter, it's slightly closer tasting to cider than it is to beer." Jones has other plans to produce other gluten-free beers, including a five per cent pale ale.
    Currently, Cheslic is stocked in a range of local New Zealand retailers in Christchurch, including Fresh Choice in Parklands and Merivale, New World South City, The Beer Library, The Bottle-O Elmwood and various others.
    Stay tuned for more great stories about gluten-free beer breakthroughs worldwide.
    Source:
    stuff.co.nz

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    Dr. Vikki Petersen D.C, C.C.N
    Celiac.com 02/22/2018 - I am writing this article hoping to help those who have been diagnosed with gluten intolerance but who are still not feeling well, as well as for those who need to be diagnosed or will be in the future.
    Just to clarify our terms, I use 'gluten intolerance' as an umbrella term to encompass both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.
    I have the privilege of speaking with many individuals, on a weekly basis, who not only live in the locality of my clinic but also those who live across the United States and internationally. Just a few days ago I had phone consultations with individuals living in Shanghai, Philadelphia and Los Angeles.
    My clinic, HealthNOW Medical Center, is a destination clinic where we treat individuals who live at a distance as well as those who live nearby, hence these particular calls. As a result of doing such consultations and receiving responses to my lectures, books, blogs and videos, I have an opportunity to speak with many people and hear their stories.
    Frankly I often wish I had the ability to 'beam them up' utilizing the fictional technology from Star Trek—it would make travel logistics a piece of cake and I'd be able to help more people faster.
    Getting back to reality, I want to review the most common mistakes and misconceptions that I run into with people who are gluten intolerant. These miscues are resulting in ill health both currently and in the individual's future.
    Here's a list of 10:
    1. People who are pretty convinced of their sensitivity based on their own experimentation but who later abandon their own knowledge when a celiac test is negative.
    Discussion: Firstly, they should know that celiac testing is not highly sensitive. If it were, we would be diagnosing more than 5% of the celiacs in this country.
    Secondly, a negative celiac test is NOT an absolute indicator that one doesn't have the disease, it in no way tests for gluten sensitivity, a serious condition affecting likely fifteen times the number of people who have celiac disease.
    Finally, the gold standard test that we utilize here at HealthNow is one that has been established by other researchers to be quite reliable. It is the very test that this person is now ignoring. Namely, eliminating gluten for 30 days to see how you feel. A noticeable improvement in symptoms is a valid test.
    Too often I speak with people who are quite seriously ill. They have ignored, sometimes for years, something they knew to be the truth simply because an insensitive lab test didn't corroborate their own identification of gluten intolerance.
    Don't ignore the knowledge you possess about your body. If you need a lab test to affirm that knowledge, there's always genetic testing for both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. Entero Labs has a good test for both.
    2. Some people discover they are gluten intolerant by self experimentation or by actually receiving a gluten sensitivity or celiac blood test that has positive results. Unfortunately some doctors have antiquated data regarding these diseases and believe that an intestinal biopsy is needed to confirm a diagnosis.
    Such doctors insist that their patients reintroduce gluten into their diet for a minimum of six weeks and then schedule an intestinal endoscopy and biopsy.
    Discussion: It was once thought that a biopsy was the 'gold standard' for celiac diagnosis. We now know that to be untrue. When I say 'we' I am referring to those in the field who research or who stay on the cutting edge of research. Unfortunately there are many doctors who are not in this category and their lack of current knowledge puts their patients at great risk.
    I cannot tell you how many times I have spoken with individuals who have reintroduced gluten into their diets, despite their knowledge of how sick it would make them, only to get extremely ill, sometimes for months. Worse still, some patients initiated an autoimmune disease due to the reintroduction that we couldn't completely reverse.
    I call reintroducing gluten 'Russian roulette'. Perhaps you can now appreciate why.
    One should NEVER EVER reintroduce gluten once they know they are sensitive to it, regardless of any test result. There is no test that is 'worth' risking your health over, especially not for a biopsy that is very poor at identifying the presence of non-classical celiac disease and gluten sensitivity.
    That brings up some new terminology:
    Classic celiac disease describes the disease as it was originally described as primarily digestive in nature, and associated with destruction of the lining of the small intestine. We now know, through research, that classical celiac forms a minority of celiac cases. Once again, these data are not well known in the medical community, which explains why we miss 95% of those who suffer from the disease.
    Gluten sensitivity is an intolerance to gluten that is not associated with the destruction of the lining of the small intestine but it creates inflammation through the immune system and creates many of the same diseases and symptoms associated with celiac disease. Conservative estimates of the incidence of gluten sensitivity put it at 15% of the population, making it much more prevalent than celiac disease. Assuming other factors, an intestinal biopsy would not be positive in an individual with gluten sensitivity.
    3. Individuals who try the gluten-free diet and find it difficult and decide to limit gluten instead of eliminating it, thinking that less gluten is bound to help.
    Discussion: Unfortunately, whether you have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, gluten consumption requires a zero tolerance policy. I like to tell patients that consuming gluten is a qualitative factor not a quantitative one. In other words, ANY gluten is problematic.
    It does make intuitive sense that more of a toxic substance is bound to create greater harm than less, but with gluten intolerance that doesn't happen to be the case. It doesn't require much gluten to begin the cascade of inflammation that can create one of the more than 300 diseases and conditions associated with it.
    4. A person does not exemplify the classic symptoms of celiac disease (see point #2 above for a definition) and therefore gets no cooperation from their doctor for appropriate testing.
    Discussion: This scenario can result in many different repercussions. An individual can strongly suspect gluten intolerance based on observing their body's reactions to it, but due to the absence of classic digestive symptoms, their doctor refuses to test them and, worse yet, persuades them that gluten could not possibly be a problem!
    This one frustrates me because the person knows, without question, that gluten is the culprit but they allow a clinician who is operating from a dated knowledge base, to cause them to doubt themselves, and, as a result, the patient damages their health even further.
    I truly cannot tell you how often I hear such stories. These individuals feel completely adrift and helpless because they literally don't know where to turn for help. I'm glad when they find our clinic and we can validate what they know to be true and really get down to work to improve their health.
    5. There are some individuals who cannot 'feel' the effects of cheating and due to this they continue to cheat and eat gluten.
    Discussion: This is a tough one because it is human nature to avoid things that make us feel badly but it's more difficult if there are no obvious effects.
    Someone who has been diagnosed as gluten intolerant is having a reaction to gluten and it is shortening their lifespan and moving them closer to disease, each and every time they cheat.
    In the past, here at HealthNOW, we have used laboratory testing to 'show' patients that their immune system was registering their cheating and thereby (hopefully) convince them that damage is being caused.
    Fortunately a new lab test by Cyrex Labs is due to be released this summer (2012) that will go a step further. This test will reveal if an autoimmune disease is being created as a result of consuming gluten and what part of the body is being targeted.
    We may not 'feel' diseases in the making, so this test will be a wonderful asset to educating patients about what consequences they may be bringing on themselves as a result of their lax diet.
    6. Some people 'cheat' expecting something dramatic to occur within a few hours and when it doesn't they think they are okay to cheat occasionally.
    Discussion: This really is a point of poor education on the part of the doctor, their patient or both. We put in a lot of time with our patients to ensure that they understand that a reaction to gluten can occur within hours or days of ingesting it. We do our very best to ensure that patients understand that a headache or rash (as an example) that appears two days after a gluten 'cheat' is a reaction to that dietary indiscretion.
    We also strive to ensure that they understand that the damage goes way beyond the symptom that they feel. It goes deeper to the degree that they are likely creating a degenerative or autoimmune disease with their lax diet.
    7. I hear too many stories from people who actually received a positive blood test for celiac disease but who were then told by their doctor that the test was not 'for sure' and instead the doctor decided to concentrate on a different disease the patient had rather than prescribe a strict gluten-free diet.
    Discussion: The above may strike you as a little unbelievable. I only wish it was. I don't know if certain clinicians just don't feel comfortable asking their patients to follow a diet that they might not want to follow, or what exactly the issue is. But the above scenario has come up often.
    To add insult to injury the disease process that the doctor has decided to focus on rather than the celiac disease is often a disease CAUSED by gluten!
    I distinctly remember a young adult woman who was told by her endocrinologist that they were going to focus on her diabetes rather than her celiac disease because it would be 'too much' to address both. There is strong research evidence of the correlation between celiac disease and diabetes, not to mention the fact that untreated celiac disease is known to increase the risk of death from all causes.
    8. Individuals with known gluten intolerance let 'peer pressure' cause them to cheat.
    Discussion: You might think that I'm only talking about children here but I'm not. As a matter a fact I often find my younger patients to be quite disciplined. Adults, however, do at times suffer from 'not wanting to be different' or 'not wanting to be rude' and they solve their dilemma by cheating.
    My advice here is to explain to the person urging you to cheat that gluten is like rat poison to you. This works well for those people who say, "Come on, a little won't kill you…". Ask the person how they would feel if you offered them 'just a little' rat poison. Would they take it? After all, it's just a little.
    You get my point. I've been doing this for more than twenty years and patients report that this example does seem to communicate well to others. Feel free to utilize whatever talking points work best for you, but PLEASE, don't let peer pressure damage your good health.
    9. Some people have close relatives they know to have celiac disease or other autoimmune diseases and they don't get tested for gluten intolerance because they're 'afraid to find out' or they don't feel too badly or they just don't know about the strong correlation between gluten intolerance and autoimmune disease.
    Discussion: There's a saying that goes, "What you don't know can't hurt you." Unfortunately that's not true for people with gluten intolerance. Deciding not to get tested doesn't diminish or slow down gluten's degenerative effects.
    Gluten isn't something you can hide from. If gluten intolerance or autoimmune diseases are a part of your family tree I would strongly suggest that you get tested for both celiac disease and gluten sensitivity and if negative, confirm the accuracy or inaccuracy of that test result with a thirty day gluten elimination diet.
    It is that important that you know for sure that you are not part of the genetic predisposition that is present in your family tree.
    10. Patients eliminate gluten due to a diagnosis of gluten intolerance but after initially feeling much better, they begin to feel poorly again and don't know what to do to correct the problem.
    Discussion: This may be the last point on our list but it certainly is not the least important. In fact, when I'm talking with individuals who know they have celiac disease or gluten sensitivity, this is one of the most common complaints I hear.
    Unfortunately the medical profession's sole treatment strategy for celiac disease is gluten avoidance, period. I wish that was enough, but for the vast majority of people it isn't.
    The secondary effects created by gluten intolerance do not remedy themselves when gluten is removed from the diet. Gluten has a devastating effect on the body's immune system and in order to normalize that immune system there are several factors that must be addressed, the most common of which follow:
    a. The presence of pathogenic (disease-causing) organisms. These can be bacteria, parasites, amoeba, etc., but they must be discovered and treated in order to remove excess stress from the immune system and to allow vital healing of the small intestine.
    b. An imbalance of the good bacteria or probiotic population in the small intestine. These probiotics (or microbiome) account for the strength of the immune system and supporting their restoration to a healthy, robust level is critical for the immune system as well as the prevention of disease.
    c. Cross-reactive foods can be part of the patient's diet and these foods can mimic the effects of gluten thereby preventing healing and causing gluten-related symptoms despite a gluten-free diet. These foods are often temporary irritants while the body is healing but we have found some patients who require permanent elimination of some of these foods.
    d. Hormonal imbalance created by the stress on the body that gluten creates is something that must be normalized through natural means in order to regain mental balance, increased energy levels and normalized weight, just to name a few.
    e. Toxic elements including heavy metals and poor detoxification abilities of the body are also a potential hurdle that needs to be overcome when restoring health to someone who is gluten intolerant.
    f. Enzyme and vitamin deficiencies should be evaluated and treated as they are discovered.
    Basically, the stress on the system that gluten has created must be diagnosed and remedied in order for the individual to regain optimal health.
    Addressing these secondary effects is not complicated. It takes the knowledge of what they are, how to correctly test for them and how to effectively treat them, but this is not difficult. The lack of widespread awareness of these factors results in many individuals continuing to suffer despite maintaining their gluten-free lifestyle.
    This just isn't fair and it's something I am passionate about remedying. I hope you found this helpful for yourself, a family member or a close friend. Feel free to contact me if you need assistance. I'm here to help and welcome you to give me a call for a free health analysis. Call 408-733-0400.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/21/2018 - There's more than a bit of talk in the sports world these days about the potential benefits of a gluten-free diet, even for athletes with no known gluten-sensitivities. More recent questions have been proposed whether the gluten free diet should be recommended for endurance athletes. Swimmers are endurance athletes, so should swimmers go gluten free?
    Obviously athletes with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity will see major health and performance benefits by avoiding gluten. Athletes with known gluten-sensitivities include tennis champion Novak Djokovic, who claims to have been diagnosed with a gluten sensitivity in 2010, and Swimmer Dana Vollmer, who is known to suffer from gluten intolerance as well as other allergies.
    However, a number of high profile athletes with no known sensitivity to gluten have also adopted gluten-free diets, including NFL quarterback Tom Brady, baseball players Justin Morneau and Raúl Ibañez, and football player Cedric Benson, among many others. Athletes claim benefits like speedier recovery times to better stamina and energy levels, despite any solid science to support such claims.
    A US National Library of Medicine study done with non-celiac athletes found no benefits in athletic performance, gastro-intestinal symptoms, or well-being by following a gluten-free diet compared with a non-gluten-free diet.
    So, the short answer is no, swimmers and other athletes who are not sensitive to gluten should not adopt a gluten-free diet.
    That said, if you are not celiac and decide to adopt a gluten-free diet, do take extra measures to make sure you are getting proper nutrition and proper fiber in your diet.
    Read more at: Swimmingworldmagazine.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/20/2018 - Party City has pulled a controversial advertising spot that provoked outrage in gluten-free community by tagging gluten-free dieters as 'gross.'
    Moreover, both Party City, and the advertising firm behind the pre-Super bowl ad, Hill Holliday, have issued public apologies in an effort to mitigate the outrage caused by its obviously insensitive ad.
    The ad starred two women attending a Super Bowl party and standing in front of an "inflatable snack stadium."
    When one of the women points out the gluten-free options, the other asks "Do we even know people that are like that?"
    The first woman answers: "Tina."
    To which, the second woman says: "Oh, gross, yeah."
    Perhaps unsurprisingly, furious viewers wasted no time in launching the Twitter hashtag #IAmTina, which called out both Party City and Hill Holliday for insensitivity toward people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity.
    Party City apologized via Instagram, and also clarified that celebrity Sunny Anderson played no part in the campaign.
    The company statement reads, in part: "Party City values its customers above all else, and we take your feedback extremely seriously. We recognize that we made an error in judgment by running the recent Big Game commercial, which was insensitive to people with food allergies…We will also be reviewing our internal vetting process on all advertising content to avoid any future issues. In addition, Party City will be making a donation in support of Celiac Disease research."
    Read more at: Adweek.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/19/2018 - It's very important that people with celiac disease maintain a gluten-free diet. Still, there has been some data to suggest that some people with celiac disease may be "hyper vigilant" in their approach to a gluten-free diet, and that such extreme vigilance can cause them stress and reduce their overall quality of life. Can a more relaxed approach improve quality of life for some people with the disease?
    A team of researchers recently set out to determine whether "extreme vigilance" to a strict gluten-free diet may increase symptoms such as anxiety and fatigue, and therefore, lower quality of life (QOL). The research team included Randi L. Wolf, Benjamin Lebwohl, Anne R. Lee, Patricia Zybert, Norelle R. Reilly, Jennifer Cadenhead, Chelsea Amengual, and Peter H. R. Green. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Health and Behavior Studies, Program in Nutrition, Teachers College Columbia University New York USA, the Department of Medicine, Celiac Disease Center Columbia University Medical Center, Harkness Pavilion New York, USA.
    The team assessed the influence of QOL with energy levels and adherence to, and knowledge about, a gluten-free diet. For their cross-sectional prospective study, the team looked at 80 teenagers and adults, all with biopsy-confirmed celiac disease, living in a major metropolitan area. They assessed QOL using celiac disease-specific metrics. The team based dietary vigilance on 24-hour recalls and an interview. They based knowledge on a food label quiz. They used open-ended questions to describe facilitators and barriers to following a gluten-free diet.
    Overall, extremely vigilant adults had greater knowledge, but significantly lower QOL scores than their more relaxed counterparts. Both teens and adults who reported lower energy levels had much lower overall QOL scores than those with higher energy levels.
    To maintain a strict gluten-free diet, hyper-vigilant celiacs were more likely to avoid eating out, to cook at home, and to use internet sites and apps. For hyper vigilant eaters, eating out was especially challenging. Being hyper-vigilant about maintaining a strict gluten-free diet can cause stress and adverse effects in both teens and adults with celiac disease.
    Doctors may want to look toward balancing advocacy of a gluten-free diet with promoting social and emotional well-being for celiac patients. In some cases, allowing a more relaxed approach may increase well-being and, thus, make dietary adherence easier. Obviously, people would need to tailor any relaxation in their gluten-free vigilance to make sure they weren't suffering preventable symptoms or doing themselves any harm.
    Source:
    Dig Dis Sci (2018)

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/17/2018 - Roasted vegetables and smashed potatoes come together with enchilada sauce to deliver a tasty, memorable meal.
    Ingredients:
    10 medium roasted potatoes, smashed 1 head cauliflower, cut into florets 12 ounces whole button mushrooms 3 small zucchini, chopped 2 cups chopped carrots ½ cup black olives (canned, sliced) 3 cups water ½ cup milk, more as needed ¼ cup butter  1 dozen corn tortillas 3 cups gluten-free enchilada sauce, red or green, as desired 8 ounces shredded Cheddar cheese ¼ cup olive oil salt and pepper to taste Directions:
    Heat oven to 425 degrees F (220 degrees C).
    In a large mixing bowl, combine cauliflower, mushrooms, zucchini, potatoes and carrots. Drizzle the vegetables with olive oil, and season with salt and pepper.
    Spread vegetables in a single layer in a shallow baking dish. Roast vegetables until tender, about 30 minutes. Stir once about midway through cooking.
    Remove roasted vegetables from the oven, and reduce oven temperature to 350 degrees F (175 degrees C).
    In a large bowl, mash the potatoes with the butter and milk to standard mashed potato consistency.
    Stir in roasted vegetables.
    In a dry skillet over medium heat, quickly heat each tortilla on both sides to make pliable. Dip the tortillas in enchilada sauce.
    Put a large spoonful of potato-veggie mixture into the center of each tortilla.
    Top mixture with 1 tablespoons cheese, and roll tortillas. Place seam-side down in a 9x13 inch baking dish.
    Pour extra sauce over top, and top with remaining cheese.
    Bake at 350 degrees F (175 degrees C) for approximately 25 minutes, until the enchiladas are heated and cheese is bubbly.

    Diana Gitig Ph.D.
    Celiac.com 02/16/2018 - Gluten sensitivity is a real thing. None other than Alessio Fasano, the renowned celiac researcher at the University of Maryland, has said as much. The problem is, there is not really an accurate way to diagnose it. But now that gluten-free foods are Big Business, generating almost $2.5 billion in US sales in 2010, Fasano and fourteen other experts convened in London to characterize exactly who needs to avoid gluten and why. Results are reported in BMC Medicine and covered by the Wall Street Journal.
    Wheat allergies can be diagnosed with a skin prick showing the presence of IgE antibodies. These are not particularly accurate, however, because the reagents used do not necessarily contain all of the allergens present in wheat and because they give a positive result for people who are allergic to grass pollens. Thus, an oral food challenge is often required for a definitive diagnosis.
    Unlike the wheat allergy, celiac disease, dermatitis herpetiformis, and gluten ataxia are autoimmune diseases. They are mediated by the IgA class of antibodies that are induced by the presence of gluten to attack the body's own transglutaminase enzymes at different locations; in celiac disease they attack tissue transglutaminase in the gut, in dermatitis herpetiformis they attack epidermal transglutaminase in the skin, and in gluten ataxia they attack tTG6, a transglutaminase expressed in the brain. In contrast to an allergy these ailments cannot be outgrown, and those who have them must strictly avoid gluten, and the related proteins in barley and rye, for their entire lives.
    People with gluten sensitivity are defined as those have neither an allergic nor an autoimmune response to gluten, but who feel crappy when they eat it and better when they avoid it. There is suggestive evidence that gluten sensitivity might be mediated by the innate immune system, a more primal arm of the immune system than the adaptive immune system that mediates celiac disease. Eating gluten can often make these people feel sicker than it does people with celiac disease, who can be asymptomatic; yet gluten does not destroy their intestines, whereas even the tiniest drop of gluten can cause damage to the intestines of celiac patients.
    Fasano notes that all adverse reactions to gluten are on the rise. Perhaps this is because the wheat variety that is now most common has a much higher gluten content than those varieties that have been used historically, and because gluten is now a hidden ingredient in many processed foods—so we are consuming more of it than we ever have before. However, he also knows a trend when he sees one, noting that "a placebo effect of the dietary treatment is often difficult to determine" and "the market is filled by individuals affected by maladies that have been claimed to be affected by gluten exposure, including autism spectrum disorder, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, multiple sclerosis and irritable bowel syndrome, but for which there is no evidence of the effectiveness of this diet."
    Sources:
    Sapone et al. Spectrum of gluten-related disorders: consensus on new nomenclature and classification. BMC Medicine 2012, 10: 13. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970204136404577206891526292590.html?KEYWORDS=gluten+free  http://blogs.wsj.com/health/2012/02/07/health-journal-deciphering-the-ailments-tied-to-gluten/?KEYWORDS=gluten+free 

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/15/2018 - If you don't follow Premier League football, or soccer, as it's known in the States, then you can be excused for missing the recent news that Arsenal midfielder Jack Wilshere is touting a gluten-free diet that, he says, has put him in "the best shape of his career."
    After being plagued by injuries the last few years, Wilshire told the London Evening Standard that he has been "dairy and gluten-free now for six weeks." He says he looks and feels better, and is a bit leaner after dropping a bit of weight.
    Most importantly, Wilshire says he feels "sharper and quicker on the pitch…like [he] can last longer."
    For example, at the end of the Chelsea game when we scored the second goal, I felt, "Come on, we can go on again here." I was pressing them and felt good."I know my body well, I know the right foods to eat and the best way to recover. I'm also getting the right amount of sleep."I've learned that over the years and I think I'm in the best shape I have ever been."
    Wilshere starred in a thrilling 2-2 draw at home to Chelsea on Wednesday, opening the scoring with a thumping close-range finish. That draw saw Wilshere play his sixth consecutive full Premier League match.
    Of course, even bearing in mind Jack Wilshire's effusive claims, there is simply no good scientific evidence to support the idea that a gluten-free diet can improve physical fitness in people who do not have celiac disease, or some other medical intolerance to gluten. Still, this is likely not the last such story we will hear about the perceived benefits of a gluten-free diet.
    Source:
    IrishExaminer.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/14/2018 - If you have celiac disease, and follow a gluten-free diet by medical necessity, you would likely never regard avoiding gluten as particularly sexy or attractive. Well, you would be wrong.
    Gluten-free eaters are getting more dates, more sex, and more orgasms, than their non-gluten-free counterparts, according to the online dating site Match.com.
    Results from the company's annual Singles in America survey indicate that gluten-free eaters are more than twice as likely to go on a date, and more than one-and-a-half times less likely to have a dating dry spell lasting two or more years.
    And when it comes to orgasms, well, of the 5,000 people who responded to the survey, those reporting orgasms are 43 percent more likely to be gluten-free.
    So, there you have it. Gluten-free is officially sexy.
    Still, exactly what might make gluten-free people sexier and more attractive than gluten eaters, your guess is as good as ours. We'll be happy to hear your thoughts in our comments section below.
    The survey also provided some interesting information on people's willingness to have sex with robots, and on their views about whether surreptitious robot sex constitutes cheating. Guys were twice as likely to be up for robot sex, but both men and women agree that hitting the robot on the side would be cheating.
    Read more at: SFGate.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/13/2018 - It is perhaps unsurprising that processed gluten-free foods are less nutritious than their gluten-containing counterparts.
    We've had data showing gluten-free foods to be high in sugar. We've had studies that show us they contain more salt. And now, for the trifecta, we have a recent study that shows us they contain more fat, sugar and salt.
    A study by the University of Hertfordshire surveyed more than 1,700 products from five UK supermarket chains and found that gluten-free foods have more fat, salt and sugar than their gluten-including counterparts, despite consumer perception that they "healthier" options. Except for crackers, every gluten-free food in the survey had more saturated fat, sugar and salt than non-gluten-free counterparts.
    On average for gluten-free brown bread and white bread had more than double the fat of regular breads. Gluten-free products also had significantly lower protein content than their gluten-containing equivalents, and were generally lower in ï¬ber and protein.
    Gluten-free products were also more likely to break the budget. On average, gluten-free products were also more than 1½ times more expensive than their counterparts, while gluten-free brown and white bread and gluten-free white and wholegrain flour sold at more than four times the price of comparable regular breads, on average.
    Overall, gluten-free foods are likely to be less nutritious and more expensive than their non-gluten-free counterparts.
    Basically, people on a gluten-free diet need to be extra careful about getting nutritious food. Simply substituting gluten-free versions of a a standard non-gluten-free diet likely means more fat, sugar and salt in your diet, along with less fiber. If you don't have a medically diagnosed reason for avoiding gluten, then be mindful about four food choices.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/12/2018 - Coffee giant Starbucks is debuting a new line of vegan, gluten-free and dairy-free options on menu throughout the UK.
    The company's announcement was timed to coincide with 'Veganuary,' a month-long promotion of the vegan lifestyle.
    The inclusion of oat milk to the new menu means that Starbucks now offers four dairy-free alternatives for their hot beverages: oat milk; almond milk; coconut milk; and soy milk.
    BBQ jack fruit is apparently the new vegan alternative to pulled pork, so the new item should be both an emotional and nutritious alternative to meat.
    If you're hankering for a meaty, vegan sandwich alternative, then the bbq jackfruit wrap is just the thing for you. The new seeded whole wheat wrap comes with shredded carrot and puréed sweetcorn slaw. According to Starbucks, the jackfruit wrap is chalked full of protein.
    For those who haven't given up meat, but have given up gluten, Starbucks offers a Chicken & Pesto Gluten Free Panini.
    Beginning January 2018, these and other items will be available at Starbucks locations throughout the UK. Hopefully this and more gluten-free options will spread to Starbucks in the USA and other countries.
    Read more at: Gloucestershirelive.co.uk

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/10/2018 - People with celiac disease must avoid all forms of gluten from wheat, rye, or barley. So, what about Kamut? Is Kamut safe for people with celiac disease or gluten-sensitivity?
    Like Spelt, Kamut is simply another form of wheat that is sometimes wrongly thought to be gluten-free.
    Kamut is simply a trademark for a specific kind of wheat, Khorasan wheat, grown under specific conditions. Khorasan wheat is triticum turanicum. It is wheat, and it contains gluten, which people with celiac disease should not eat.
    So, in short, Kamut is NOT safe for people with celiac disease or any sensitivity to gluten.
    Because Kamut is still a type of wheat that contains gluten it is not safe for people with celiac diseases and appears on Celiac.com's UNSAFE food list of non-gluten-free foods.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/09/2018 - A newlywed couple have raised accusations of sick guests, inappropriate food, and breach of contract in filing suit against wedding vendors they say ruined their surprise vegan wedding, which was also to include gluten-free snacks for some guests.
    The wedding took place in May, 2017, and by Christmas, the family had already filed suit in Ramsey County against vendors Mintahoe, Inc., A'Bulae, LLC, and Bellagala for breach of contract. The lawsuit states the venue choice near Mears Park in downtown St. Paul was "absolutely contingent" on their commitment to provide a "delicious" vegan dinner to wedding guests.
    According to the couple, the main idea was to serve delicious food that guests would not suspect was "an entirely plant-based meal." The couple intended for the surprise to be revealed at the end of the night, when servers were to put out signs announcing that the entire meal had been vegan.
    Among the claims made by the family of the bride and groom are that a guest with celiac disease ate a seitan skewer that she believed was gluten-free, but which actually contained gluten, and that the guest became "very ill" as a result. The couple says the hotel's pastry chef took home the leftover vegan wedding cake the couple had ordered from an off-site vendor, instead of making sure it went to the wedding party.
    The couple's complaints go on to cite a litany of perceived offenses, including "horrific" food and service, "missing" bamboo shoots bean sprouts, too many carrots, and "horrific…sickeningly sweet," sauce that was not the peanut sauce they expected.
    The couple also complains that the groom's room before the wedding was "extremely hot and stifling," and disputes the cost of the menu for the wedding, which was mostly Thai food. In fairness, though, their main complaint seems to be that the food was terrible, rather than the fact that it wasn't vegan.
    The couple and mother-of-the-bride are seeking $21,721 for each of the seven counts of breach of contract, totaling $152,047, along with an award of damages to be determined at trial.
    What do you make of the situation? Right on the money, or a gluten-free bridge too far?
    Source: KTSP

    Sandi Star, HHP, CNC, CCMH
    Celiac.com 02/08/2018 - Have you ever considered being tested for a genetic defect called MTHFR? If you have a family history of heart disease or stroke, migraines, trouble getting pregnant or have a child with Autism you might want to consider reading on to learn more. These are just a few of the list of conditions linked to MTHFR mutation. Surprisingly, 60% of our population has this mutation and most do not even know what MTHFR is.
    I recently came up positive myself for MTHFR A1298C. We will talk more about the two common markers in a bit. This changes everything when it comes to choices and is important to have the knowledge when choosing foods and supplementation. It's also important to monitor your folate levels. More to come.
    Interestingly, Untreated celiac disease may be associated with hyperhomocysteinemia caused by a combination of vitamin deficiencies and variants in the MTHFR gene. If you are not healing with a gluten free diet this might be a test to consider. [1]
    So, what is MTHFR?
    The MTHFR gene (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) is an enzyme that plays an important role in processing amino acids, the building blocks of proteins. Now you know why it's an acronym! Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase is important for a chemical reaction involving forms of the vitamin folate (also called vitamin B9). This enzyme converts a molecule called 5,10-methylenetetrahydrofolate to a molecule called 5-methyltetrahydrofolate. This reaction is required for the multistep process that converts the amino acid homocysteine to another amino acid, methionine. The body uses methionine to make proteins and other important compounds. [2]
    Although, there are over fifty known MTHFR variants, two are commonly tested C677T and A1298.
    Some of the key things methylation process is responsible for are:
    Cellular Repair – DNA repair is a collection of processes by which a cell identifies and corrects damage to the DNA molecules that encode its genome (genetic material of an organism). Detoxification and Neurotransmitter Production – The interconversion of amino acids. Healthy Immune System Function – Formation and maturation of red blood cells, white blood cells and platelet production. What's the Difference Between the Two Most Common Types?
    The 677T Variant is associated with heart disease and stroke whereas the 1298C is associated with a variety of chronic illness. Either one however can cause general health problems.
    Homozygous vs Heterozygous
    An organism can be homozygous dominant, if it carries two copies of the same dominant allele (allele - one of two or more alternative forms of a gene that arise by mutation and are found at the same place on a chromosome.), or homozygous recessive, if it carries two copies of the same recessive allele. Heterozygous means that an organism has two different alleles of a gene.
    If you are homozygous (2 abnormal copies) your enzyme efficiency drops to 10% - 20% of normal which can be problematic. A more serious combination is 677T/1298C which has both genetic anomalies.
    If you are having symptoms and can't quite put your finger on it I would suggest getting tested for the MTHFR. That will help your practitioner determine what supplementation best suits your needs. Diet will also be a factor as with MTHFR the body cannot process synthetic folate which is in fortified foods such as cereal, nutritional yeast (can get unfortified), breads, rice, pastas, flour, etc., This explains why I always got a headache after I ate fortified nutritional yeast. I switched to unfortified and I don't have the headaches.
    As mentioned above, there are many chronic conditions linked to MTHFR. Here are a few:
    Alzheimer's Autism Autoimmune Disorders Breast cancer Chronic Fatigue Down's Syndrome Fibromyalgia Heart Disease IBS (irritable bowel syndrome) Infertility in both men and women Mental disorders such as bipolar and schizophrenia Migraines Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Sensitivity to chemicals Stroke The Great Detoxifier
    Glutathione is the body's main antioxidant and detoxifier. What happens with MTHFR mutation is it can make you susceptible to disease by lowering your body's ability to make glutathione. Most people with MTHFR have low glutathione levels. With low glutathione levels, you are more sensitive to toxins and chemicals including heavy metals. The good news is you can supplement glutathione in the correct methyl form and change up your diet. More to come on this. With oxidative stress, we are more likely to have premature aging as well. Another reason to be aware of MTHFR and maintain a healthy high folate diet along with supporting supplementation.
    Testing
    If you have any of the symptoms above or have a family history with MTHFR mutations I highly recommend testing for both C677T and A1298. Testing can be done through a practitioner. You can go to 23andme and order the test or work with your health practitioner. It's inexpensive and well worth it. Also, testing your levels of glutathione and folate would be beneficial so your practitioner knows where your levels are before recommending supplementation.
    Supplementation for MTHFR
    If you are taking a B vitamin, make sure it's methyl-B12, methyl-folate. Taking synthetic forms (folic acid) can be more harmful than good because the body cannot do the conversion. It's essential to make sure that your method delivers the antioxidant efficiently to your cells. One of the B vitamins I recommend from Pure Genomics is their B Complex available on our marketplace.
    Glutathione is also important but hard to absorb so a liposome form is recommended or get one with a precursor called NAC (N-acetyl-cysteine). Glutathione is important for detoxification as mentioned. Here are a few to consider – Liposomal Glutathione by Pure Encapsulations as a liposome form With any supplement, you can have adverse effects so make sure you work with a knowledgeable practitioner.
    Diet and Lifestyle
    Folic Acid vs. Folate
    While folic acid and folate may be marketed interchangeably, as mentioned earlier, their metabolic effects can be quite different, especially for those with the MTHFR mutation. Folate is the bioavailable, natural form of vitamin B9 found in a variety of plant and animal foods. Folic acid, on the other hand while readily utilized by the body is synthetic. Folate is found in supplements and fortified foods such as cereals and might I add nutritional yeast. The body is more adept at using folate and regulates healthy levels by discarding excess folate in urine. With MTHFR folic acid can be problematic so make sure you purge the folic acid rich foods and supplements. For those who love the flavor of nutritional yeast and use it in vegan recipes there are a few companies who make unfortified versions you can get off amazon.
    Daily lifestyle activities such as dry brushing (lymphatic circulation) Epsom salt baths, exercise, sauna's (infrared sauna is amazing) and of course a healthy diet rich in natural forms of folate such as:
    Beans and lentils Leafy green vegetables including raw spinach Asparagus Romaine Lettuce Broccoli Avocado Bright-colored fruits, such as papaya and orange Here are just a few examples of some folate rich foods. As you can see spinach packs a powerful punch of folate as well as papaya and lentils coming in the highest. [2]
    Source
     
    Spinach
    Asparagus
    Papaya
    Orange
    Lentils
    Pinto Beans
    Sunflower Seeds
    Serving Size
     
    1 Cup
    1 Cup
    1 papaya
    1 orange
    1 Cup
    1 Cup
    ¼ Cup
     
    Folate
     
    263 mcg
    262 mcg
    115 mcg
    40 mcg
    358 mcg
    294 mcg
    82 mcg
    DV %
     
    65%
    64%
    29%
    10%
    90%
    74%
    21%
    Did you know your liver needs glutathione to produce bile in addition to the detoxification process? Look at addressing health issues such as leaky gut, IBS and Inflammation as these can affect absorption and neurotransmitter levels as well as hormones with MTHFR A1298C mutations.
    MTHFR mutations are tied to higher mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, bipolar and schizophrenia as well as chronic fatigue and fibromyalgia. It's important to find ways to manage the stressors in addition to healing the gut as symptoms can be heightened with MTHFR.
    Protect the heart with an anti-inflammatory diet rich in omegas, fiber and plants. Omega 3 and COQ10 supplementation is helpful. A good multi is beneficial as long as you get one with B12 (methyl cobalamin) and Folate (methyl tetrahydrofolate) forms.
    Drug Interactions to consider
    You should not use any supplements without first talking to your health care provider. For example, folate should not be taken at the same time as the antibiotic tetracycline because it interferes with the absorption and effectiveness of this medication. Folate is necessary if taking medications for birth control, cholesterol or seizures for example as they may lower folic acid levels in the body. Dosage and timing is important to know.
    Here are some medications to keep in mind:
    Antacids, H2 blockers, proton pump inhibitors Bile acid sequestrants Carbamazepine Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) Sulfasalazine Triamterene When taken for long periods of time, these medications, as well as other anti-inflammatory and anti-seizure medicines, can increase the body's need for folic acid.
    Also consider drugs used for cancer, rheumatoid arthritis and psoriasis as those also reduce the folic acid in the body. Supplementing folic acid can help reduce symptoms of these disorders however with cancer, folic acid may interfere with methotrexates effects on treatment. Talk with your practitioner if you are taking any medications. [3]
    Knowing your DNA make up is important as is knowing your numbers (blood pressure, cholesterol, etc.) so you can keep a handle on your health and do your best to control stress. Getting tested for the MTHFR mutation is worth knowing whether it comes up or not. It can make all the difference in aging and detoxing and give you a peace of mind.
    Sources:
    https://draxe.com/mthfr-mutation/  http://doccarnahan.blogspot.com/2013/05/mthfr-gene-mutation-whats-big-deal.html  https://www.jillcarnahan.com/2014/02/23/health-tips-for-anyone-with-a-mthfr-gene-mutation/ 

    Jefferson Adams
    02/07/2018 - Babesiosis is a malaria-like parasitic disease caused by infection with Babesia, a genus of Apicomplexa, which is commonly spread via the bite of infected Ixodes ticks, by blood transfusion or congenitally.
    Although most patients with babesiosis typically have a fever, there can also be non-specific symptoms, which can triggers delays or errors in diagnosis. Babesia divergens is considered the main agent of human babesiosis in Europe.
    A team of researchers recently reported a case of a celiac disease patient with splenic dysfunction from resulting in severe babesiosis. Their report describes a 79-year-old Irish man with hyposplenism and splenic atrophy due to adult celiac disease, who became critically ill from a severe Babesia divergens infection.
    So far, this is particular report about a single patient doesn't give much information beyond citing the development itself, and urging doctors to be on the lookout for possible consequences of splenic dysfunction from adult celiac disease, such as serious pneumococcal infections and babesiosis.
    The report does mirror, or touch on, another clinical report from Spain in 2016. In that report, by Arsuaga, et. al., a 35-year old patient with normal splenic function presented with persistent nonspecific symptoms such as the recurrence of fever, chills, headaches, weakness, general malaise, and constant fatigue over several months. As fever indicated an infectious disease, laboratory tests were carried out for a large number of pathogens, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, B. divergens, and B. microti. After initial treatment with atovaquone/proguanil and azithromycin failed to produce results, the patient remained on that drug regimen for 10 weeks without side effects.
    Although the patient still had frequent episodes of fever, his general condition improved. At the end of the treatment, the bouts of fever were resolved and the patient's only symptom was fatigue. In follow-up visits during the subsequent 4 months, PCR analysis revealed that the patient had cleared the parasites.
    Though these reports have been isolated, they do indicate that doctors should watch for possible consequences of splenic dysfunction from adult celiac disease, such as serious pneumococcal infections and babesiosis.
    Celiac.com will follow and report on any developments in this story.
    Sources:
    Ticks Tick Borne Dis. 2017 Jun;8(4):537-539. doi: 10.1016/j.ttbdis.2017.02.016. Epub 2017 Feb 28.  Vector-Borne and Zoonotic Diseases. October 2016, 16(10): 677-679.  
    The clinical team included S O'Connell, C Lyons, M Abdou, R Patowary, S Aslam, N Kinsella, A Zintl, KP Hunfeld, GP Wormser, J Gray, C Merry, and H Alizadeh. They are variously affiliated with the Department of Infectious Diseases, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, the Department of Surgery, Letterkenny University Hospital, Letterkenny, Ireland, the Department of Haematology, Letterkenny University Hospital, Letterkenny, Ireland, the Department of Haematology, St. James's Hospital, Dublin, Ireland, the School of Veterinary Medicine, University College Dublin, Dublin, Ireland, the Institute for Laboratory Medicine, Microbiology & Infection Control, Northwest Medical Centre, Academic Teaching Hospital, Goethe-University, Frankfurt, Germany, the Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Medicine, New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY, USA, the UCD School of Biology and Environmental Science, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland, the Department of Infectious Diseases, St. James's Hospital, Dublin 8, Ireland; Northwestern Memorial University Chicago, USA; Makerere University Uganda, Uganda, the Department of Haematology, Letterkenny University Hospital, Letterkenny, Ireland; and with Pecs University, Faculty of General Medicine, Pecs, Hungary.

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/25/2018 - A team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. The research could be helpful for treating type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease.
    In autoimmune diseases, such as type 1 diabetes, lupus, and celiac disease, the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells and tissues. Autoimmune disease affects nearly 24 million people in the United States. 
    In their study, a team of Yale University researchers discovered that bacteria in the small intestine can travel to other organs and trigger an autoimmune response. In this case, they looked at Enterococcus gallinarum, which can travel beyond the gut to the spleen, lymph nodes, and liver. They found that E. gallinarum triggered an autoimmune response in the mice when it traveled beyond the gut.
    They also found that the response can be countered by using antibiotics or vaccines to suppress the autoimmune reaction and prevent the bacterium from growing. The researchers were able to duplicate this mechanism using cultured human liver cells, and they also found the bacteria E. gallinarum in the livers of people with autoimmune disease.
    The team found that administering an antibiotic or vaccine to target E. gallinarum suppressed the autoimmune reaction in the mice and prevented the bacterium from growing. "When we blocked the pathway leading to inflammation," says senior study author Martin Kriegel, "we could reverse the effect of this bug on autoimmunity."
    Team research team plans to further investigate the biological mechanisms that are associated with E. gallinarum, along with the potential implications for systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease.
    This study indicates that gut bacteria may be the key to treating chronic autoimmune conditions such as systemic lupus and autoimmune liver disease. Numerous autoimmune conditions have been linked to gut bacteria.
    Read the full study in Science.

    Tammy Rhodes
    Celiac.com 04/24/2018 - Did you know in 2017 alone, the United States had OVER TENS OF THOUSANDS of people evacuate their homes due to natural disasters such as fires, floods, hurricanes, tornadoes and tsunamis? Most evacuation sites are not equipped to feed your family the safe gluten free foods that are required to stay healthy.  Are you prepared in case of an emergency? Do you have your Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag ready to grab and go?  
    I have already lived through two natural disasters. Neither of which I ever want to experience again, but they taught me a very valuable lesson, which is why I created a Gluten Free Emergency Food Bag (see link below). Here’s my story. If you’ve ever lived in or visited the Los Angeles area, you’re probably familiar with the Santa Ana winds and how bitter sweet they are. Sweet for cleaning the air and leaving the skies a brilliant crystal blue, and bitter for the power outages and potential brush fires that might ensue.  It was one of those bitter nights where the Santa Ana winds were howling, and we had subsequently lost our power. We had to drive over an hour just to find a restaurant so we could eat dinner. I remember vividly seeing the glow of a brush fire on the upper hillside of the San Gabriel Mountains, a good distance from our neighborhood. I really didn’t think much of it, given that it seemed so far from where we lived, and I was hungry! After we ate, we headed back home to a very dark house and called it a night. 
    That’s where the story takes a dangerous turn….about 3:15am. I awoke to the TV blaring loudly, along with the lights shining brightly. Our power was back on! I proceeded to walk throughout the house turning everything off at exactly the same time our neighbor, who was told to evacuate our street, saw me through our window, assuming I knew that our hillside was ablaze with flames. Flames that were shooting 50 feet into the air. I went back to bed and fell fast asleep. The fire department was assured we had left because our house was dark and quiet again. Two hours had passed.  I suddenly awoke to screams coming from a family member yelling, “fire, fire, fire”! Flames were shooting straight up into the sky, just blocks from our house. We lived on a private drive with only one way in and one way out.  The entrance to our street was full of smoke and the fire fighters were doing their best to save our neighbors homes. We literally had enough time to grab our dogs, pile into the car, and speed to safety. As we were coming down our street, fire trucks passed us with sirens blaring, and I wondered if I would ever see my house and our possessions ever again. Where do we go? Who do we turn to? Are shelters a safe option? 
    When our daughter was almost three years old, we left the West Coast and relocated to Northern Illinois. A place where severe weather is a common occurrence. Since the age of two, I noticed that my daughter appeared gaunt, had an incredibly distended belly, along with gas, stomach pain, low weight, slow growth, unusual looking stool, and a dislike for pizza, hotdog buns, crackers, Toast, etc. The phone call from our doctor overwhelmed me.  She was diagnosed with Celiac Disease. I broke down into tears sobbing. What am I going to feed my child? Gluten is everywhere.
    After being scoped at Children's Hospital of Chicago, and my daughters Celiac Disease officially confirmed, I worried about her getting all the nutrients her under nourished body so desperately needed. I already knew she had a peanut allergy from blood tests, but just assumed she would be safe with other nuts. I was so horribly wrong. After feeding her a small bite of a pistachio, which she immediately spit out, nuts would become her enemy. Her anaphylactic reaction came within minutes of taking a bite of that pistachio. She was complaining of horrible stomach cramps when the vomiting set in. She then went limp and starting welting. We called 911.
    Now we never leave home without our Epipens and our gluten free food supplies. We analyze every food label. We are hyper vigilant about cross contamination. We are constantly looking for welts and praying for no stomach pain. We are always prepared and on guard. It's just what we do now. Anything to protect our child, our love...like so many other parents out there have to do every moment of ever day!  
    Then, my second brush with a natural disaster happened, without any notice, leaving us once again scrambling to find a safe place to shelter. It was a warm and muggy summer morning, and my husband was away on a business trip leaving my young daughter and me to enjoy our summer day. Our Severe Weather Alert Radio was going off, again, as I continued getting our daughter ready for gymnastics.  Having gotten used to the (what seemed to be daily) “Severe Thunderstorm warning,” I didn’t pay much attention to it. I continued downstairs with my daughter and our dog, when I caught a glimpse out the window of an incredibly black looking cloud. By the time I got downstairs, I saw the cover to our grill literally shoot straight up into the air. Because we didn’t have a fenced in yard, I quickly ran outside and chased the cover, when subsequently, I saw my neighbor’s lawn furniture blow pass me. I quickly realized I made a big mistake going outside. As I ran back inside, I heard debris hitting the front of our home.  Our dog was the first one to the basement door! As we sat huddled in the dark corner of our basement, I was once again thinking where are we going to go if our house is destroyed. I was not prepared, and I should have been. I should have learned my lesson the first time. Once the storm passed, we quickly realized we were without power and most of our trees were destroyed. We were lucky that our house had minimal damage, but that wasn’t true for most of the area surrounding us.  We were without power for five days. We lost most of our food - our gluten free food.
    That is when I knew we had to be prepared. No more winging it. We couldn’t take a chance like that ever again. We were “lucky” one too many times. We were very fortunate that we did not lose our home to the Los Angeles wildfire, and only had minimal damage from the severe storm which hit our home in Illinois.
      
    In 2017 alone, FEMA (Federal Emergency Management Agency) had 137 natural disasters declared within the United States. According to FEMA, around 50% of the United States population isn’t prepared for a natural disaster. These disasters can happen anywhere, anytime and some without notice. It’s hard enough being a parent, let alone being a parent of a gluten free family member. Now, add a natural disaster on top of that. Are you prepared?
    You can find my Gluten Free Emergency Food Bags and other useful products at www.allergynavigator.com.  

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.
    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.
    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.
    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.
    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 
    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 
    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.
    Source:
    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
    Celiac.com 04/21/2018 - Dear Friends and Readers,
    I have been writing articles for Scott Adams since the 2002 Summer Issue of the Scott-Free Press. The Scott-Free Press evolved into the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. I felt honored when Scott asked me ten years ago to contribute to his quarterly journal and it's been a privilege to write articles for his publication ever since.
    Due to personal health reasons and restrictions, I find that I need to retire. My husband and I can no longer travel the country speaking at conferences and to support groups (which we dearly loved to do) nor can I commit to writing more books, articles, or menus. Consequently, I will no longer be contributing articles to the Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. 
    My following books will still be available at Amazon.com:
    Gluten-free Cooking for Dummies Student's Vegetarian Cookbook for Dummies Wheat-free Gluten-free Dessert Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Reduced Calorie Cookbook Wheat-free Gluten-free Cookbook for Kids and Busy Adults (revised version) My first book was published in 1996. My journey since then has been incredible. I have met so many in the celiac community and I feel blessed to be able to call you friends. Many of you have told me that I helped to change your life – let me assure you that your kind words, your phone calls, your thoughtful notes, and your feedback throughout the years have had a vital impact on my life, too. Thank you for all of your support through these years.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/20/2018 - A digital media company and a label data company are teaming up to help major manufacturers target, reach and convert their desired shoppers based on dietary needs, such as gluten-free diet. The deal could bring synergy in emerging markets such as the gluten-free and allergen-free markets, which represent major growth sectors in the global food industry. 
    Under the deal, personalized digital media company Catalina will be joining forces with Label Insight. Catalina uses consumer purchases data to target shoppers on a personal base, while Label Insight works with major companies like Kellogg, Betty Crocker, and Pepsi to provide insight on food label data to government, retailers, manufacturers and app developers.
    "Brands with very specific product benefits, gluten-free for example, require precise targeting to efficiently reach and convert their desired shoppers,” says Todd Morris, President of Catalina's Go-to-Market organization, adding that “Catalina offers the only purchase-based targeting solution with this capability.” 
    Label Insight’s clients include food and beverage giants such as Unilever, Ben & Jerry's, Lipton and Hellman’s. Label Insight technology has helped the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) build the sector’s very first scientifically accurate database of food ingredients, health attributes and claims.
    Morris says the joint partnership will allow Catalina to “enhance our dataset and further increase our ability to target shoppers who are currently buying - or have shown intent to buy - in these emerging categories,” including gluten-free, allergen-free, and other free-from foods.
    The deal will likely make for easier, more precise targeting of goods to consumers, and thus provide benefits for manufacturers and retailers looking to better serve their retail food customers, especially in specialty areas like gluten-free and allergen-free foods.
    Source:
    fdfworld.com