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    Scott Adams
    White vinegar or just plain vinegar are typically distilled, and, if so, are gluten-free. Distilled vinegar can be distilled from wheat, corn, potatoes, beets, wood, apples and many other things. Most in the USA are not made from wheat, but are instead made from corn, potatoes or wood, which are all safe (Heinz white vinegar is distilled from corn). Distilled vinegars that are made from wheat are probably gluten-free because of the distillation process described in Frederik Willem Janssens article on this site.
    Distilled vinegar made from wood are gluten-free. Wood-based vinegar is often the vinegar used in processed foods.
    Flavored vinegars...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/17/2013 - After earning the title of Miss Hoboken International in January, and Miss New Jersey International 2013 on March 9, celiac disease sufferer Jenna Drew will compete with young women from across the globe in the Miss International Pageant in Chicago this July.
    Asked about her opportunity to shine, Drew, 25, who works for Litzky Public Relations in Hoboken, said, “I am so thrilled…You don't get to do something like this every day. It's so exciting.”
    Drew was diagnosed with celiac disease in 2007, after a blood revealed her mother, who was battling cancer, to be suffering from the disease.
    Since 2009, she has been worki...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/22/2013 - Yeah, you heard right. People who've been dreaming of the day the Girl Scouts would offer a gluten-free cookie can stop dreaming!
    That's because a select group of Girl Scout councils nationwide will be slinging the organization's very first gluten-free offering as part of the 2013-14 Cookie Sale.
    The new cookie, called the Gluten Free Chocolate Chip Shortbread cookie, is made with real chocolate chips and real butter, and contains no artificial flavors, no artificial colors, no high fructose corn syrup, no palm oil, and no hydrogenated oils.
    The gluten-free cookies will be sold in a 5 ounce resealable foil pouch, with...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/09/2015 - The Germans are picky about their beer. They're picky about what goes into their beer. They're picky about what's even allowed to be called beer.
    They have been since 1487, when Albert IV, Duke of Bavaria enacted the Reinheitsgebot, which means literally "purity order," but if often called the "German Beer Purity Law" in English.
    The Reinheitsgebot specified that the only ingredients that could be used in the production of beer were water, barley and hops. According to that standard, many gluten-free beers on the market today could not be sold as beer in Germany. They would be some kind of malt beverage.
    The law has changed...