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  • Jefferson Adams
    Review Shines Light on Movement Disorders Related to Gluten Sensitivity
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Kim Bach
    Celiac.com 10/03/2018 - Gluten-related disorders include the full spectrum of adverse clinical symptoms and conditions triggered by eating gluten. A team of researchers recently set out to review the available medical literature concerning MDs and gluten sensitivity with and without enteropathy.
    The research team included A Vinagre-Aragón, P Zis, RA Grunewald, and M Hadjivassiliou, with the Academic Department of Neurosciences, Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Sheffield, South Yorkshire, UK. 
    Celiac disease or gluten sensitive enteropathy is the most common manifestation, but clinicians have reported a number of extra-intestinal manifestations, which may occur without enteropathy. Gluten sensitivity is another term that has been used to include all gluten-related disorders, including those where blood tests show antibodies to gluten in the absence of any enteropathy. 
    Gluten ataxia is the most common extra-intestinal neurological manifestation, and has been well documented. Clinicians have reported movement disorders related to gluten sensitivity.
    To assess the current medical literature on movement disorders and gluten sensitivity, both with and without enteropathy, the team conducted a systematic search on the PubMed database, and included 48 articles that met the inclusion criteria into the present review. 
    This review demonstrates that the range of gluten related movement disorders goes beyond gluten ataxia, and shows that the majority of patients with gluten-related disorders benefit from a gluten-free diet.
    Read the full review at: Nutrients. 2018 Aug 8;10(8). pii: E1034. doi: 10.3390/nu10081034.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com’s Six Most Popular Gluten-Free Soup Recipes
    Image Caption: Image: CC--ta@keshi kimi
    Celiac.com 10/02/2018 - With fall looming just over the horizon, we’re taking moment to share our six most popular gluten-free soup recipes. These delicious gluten-free soups have satisfied thousands of hungry gluten-free eaters, and they make great go-to recipes. They will help to anchor your gluten-free eating through the cold winter months. Make extra and freeze for a quick reliable gluten-free meal at home or on the fly. Just heat it up and dig in!  
    Celiac.com’s Six Most Popular Gluten-Free Soup Recipes are:
    Gluten-Free Easy Chicken Soup
    This gluten-free chicken soup will have you coming back for more. Perfect for a cold day, or for a day when you have a cold. Just Like Lipton's Onion Soup Mix (Gluten-free)
    This gluten-free version of good old Lipton’s Onion soup is one of my favorites. Make it ahead of time, and store for instant soup goodness. Works for all those recipes that call for Lipton’s soup. Great for dips, etc. Blend with yogurt for a great low-cal dip. Gluten-Free Split Pea Soup
    What’s cold weather without good split-pea soup? This tasty gluten-free version of traditional pea soup will have you wishing for a cloudy day. Gluten-Free Vegetable Beef Soup
    This hearty vegetable beef soup will help nourish you body and soul. Really Good Gluten-Free Potato Soup
    This rich, hearty delicious potato soup will warm your tummy and make your mouth smile.  Gluten-Free Creamy Tomato Soup
    When you need a good, creamy gluten-free tomato soup, this recipe is your new best friend.

    Jefferson Adams
    What's the Relationship Between Celiac Disease, Gluten Sensitivity and Epilepsy?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Alejandro Hernandez.
    Celiac.com 10/01/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to establish the rates of epilepsy in patients with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity and vice versa and to characterize aspects of the epileptic syndromes presented by these patients.
    The research team included Thomas Julian, Marios Hadjivassiliou, and Panagiotis Zis. They are variously affiliated with the Sheffield Institute for Translational Neuroscience University of Sheffield in Sheffield, UK; and the Academic Department of Neurosciences Sheffield Teaching Hospitals NHS Trust Sheffield, UK. 
    The team conducted a systematic computer-based literature search on the PubMed database, and gathered information on rates, demographics and epilepsy phenomenology. Patients with celiac disease are nearly twice as likely to have epilepsy as the general population. Celiac disease is twice as common in epilepsy patients as in the general population. Researchers still need to do more studies to assess rates of gluten sensitivity in epilepsy patients. 
    The data indicate that the prevalence of celiac disease or gluten sensitivity is higher for certain epilepsy scenarios, including childhood partial epilepsy with occipital paroxysms, adult patients with fixation off sensitivity (FOS) and those with temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) with hippocampal sclerosis. 
    Epilepsy in the context of gluten-related disorders is a syndrome of celiac disease, epilepsy and cerebral calcification (CEC syndrome), which is frequently described in the literature. The good news is that gluten-free diet helps to control epilepsy in 53% of cases, either reducing seizure frequency, enabling reduced doses or even termination of anti-epileptic drugs.
    Patients with epilepsy of unknown cause should receive blood tests for markers of gluten sensitivity, and may benefit from a gluten-free diet.
    Read more at: Springer.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Gluten-Free Four Berry Goat Cheese Salad
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Tomasz Stasiuk
    Celiac.com 09/29/2018 - With berry season in full swing, this recipe will help you deliver a tasty, vibrant, refreshing salad in a heartbeat.  Strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and blackberries frolic with baby spinach, almonds, avocado, cilantro, and goat cheese to deliver a super-fresh summertime salad.
    Ingredients:
    9 oz baby spinach, torn 1 cup sliced strawberries, sliced 1 cup raspberries 1 cup blueberries 1 cup blackberries ½ cup sliced almonds, toasted ⅓ cup cilantro, lightly chopped 1 avocado, chopped 4 oz goat cheese, crumbled Directions:
    Place baby spinach on each plate, then top with berries, almonds, cilantro and chopped avocado. 
    Crumble goat cheese on top then drizzle with balsamic vinegar and olive oil. Enjoy!

    Celiac.com Sponsor: Banner
    Celiac.com 09/28/2018 - You have suffered from gluten intolerance most of your life, and you wonder how you can find out if you have celiac disease without undergoing an invasive and expensive medical procedure. You also wonder if you don’t have celiac disease, what the likelihood is of developing it during your lifetime?
    Your genes can tell a great deal. Interpretation of genetic information is an extremely accurate process. A negative result nearly excludes the possibility of your ever developing celiac disease. A positive test is about 97 percent accurate. This information is available in MTHFR.com’s Celiac and Gluten Intolerance Report.
    Have you wondered if you have some level of gluten intolerance or what your chances are of developing celiac disease? 
    MTHFR.com is one of the few companies, if not the only company, in the market that provides your results with a table that explains to you how likely you are to have celiac disease, not just whether you are positive or negative. Your genetic report will display your HLA-DQ results, which will clearly show you if you have a mutation and what type of mutation you have. The report will also display your likelihood of developing celiac disease as low, high, or very high based on your unique combination of mutations of the HLA-DQ genes. 
    The more likely you are to develop celiac disease, the more likely you are to develop gluten intolerance. The higher you are on the interpretation table, the more strictly you should avoid gluten.
    According to research, a positive result will give you a likelihood of developing celiac disease with an accuracy of 97%, while the negative result's accuracy are over 99%.
    Visit our site for more info.
     

    Roy Jamron
    Can Fasting Help Regenerate a Damaged Celiac Disease Intestine?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Imad HADDAD
    Celiac.com 09/28/2018 - MIT researchers have found that intestinal stem cells removed from mice after fasting for 24 hours and grown in culture have twice the regenerative capacity of stem cells grown in culture from non-fasting mice. The study provides evidence that fasting induces a metabolic switch in the intestinal stem cells, switching from utilizing carbohydrates to burning fat. Switching these cells to fatty acid oxidation enhances their function significantly. The study also found that the beneficial effects of fasting can be reproduced by treating mice with a molecule that mimics the effects. Stem cell regeneration is dramatically improved by fasting in both young and older mice.
    Intestinal stem cells in humans lose their ability to regenerate as humans age, making it more difficult for older people to recover from gastrointestinal disease and disorders. Fasting and/or the use of drugs to mimic the regenerative effects of fasting on intestinal stem cells may, therefore, be useful to improve recovery from intestinal injury in older patients if the mice study findings are shown applicable to humans.
    This study brings to mind past research on the protein R-spondin1 which showed great potential in completely regenerating and restoring the intestinal lining. R-spondin1 was being developed as a drug by Nuvelo, Inc. of San Carlos, CA designated as NU206 in 2005. Despite early successful human safety clinical trials in 2008, research was shelved and the promising drug has continued to sit idle on the shelf for years. The patent for NU206 is now owned by ARCA Biopharma http://arcabio.com/ of Westminster, CO after a merger with Nuvelo, Inc. in 2009.
    Fasting to regenerate the intestinal lining is free and requires no FDA approvals (though physician supervision may be advised.)
    Fasting may provide other potential health benefits. A Yale study found that during dieting or fasting the compound beta-hydroxybutyrate is produced which inhibits the inflammatory response in several disorders including autoimmune diseases, type 2 diabetes, Alzheimer's disease, atherosclerosis, and autoinflammatory disorders.
    Fasting can also affect the activation of T cells. T cells are leukocytes, white blood cells. T cells are activated by antigens from pathogens presented to T cell receptors which initiates an immune response against the pathogens. In autoimmune disease, antigen presented to T cell receptors initiates an immune response which results in damage to the body itself. A Luxembourg Institute of Health study found that glutathione, important for metabolic waste disposal and detoxification, also acts as a switch which stimulates T cell energy metabolism while keeping T cells clear of metabolic wastes. Without glutathione, T cells remain inactive and sit in a hibernation state. T cell inactivity is undesirable for fighting off an infection, but, otherwise, keeping T cells inactive may ward off harmful effects of autoimmune disease.
    Fasting lowers the body's glutathione level as the body constantly consumes glutathione. In one 7-day fasting study involving healthy humans, a progressive decline in total glutathione concentration in leukocytes was found during seven days of starvation due to a decrease in free glutathione content. This study provides proof that fasting lowers glutathione levels in T cells. Hence, based on the Luxembourg study, fasting can reduce or stop the activity of T cells. Thus, fasting can be used to relieve the symptoms of autoimmune disease resulting from a T cell immune response, providing that the subject is otherwise infection free and has no condition requiring an active T cell response.
    Finally, as shown in a University of Southern California study, multiple fasting cycles lasting 2 to 4 days over a period of 6 months in both mice and humans work to rid the body of older and damaged white blood cells and trigger white blood stem cells to self-regenerate and fully repopulate the immune system with new white blood cells. Besides having applications to recovery from immune system damage caused by cancer chemotherapy toxicity, these immune system rejuvenation effects from fasting may have potential benefit applicable to treatment of autoimmune disorders.
    Sources:

    Fasting boosts stem cells' regenerative capacity.
    A drug treatment that mimics fasting can also provide the same benefit, study finds.
    Anne Trafton - MIT News Office
    May 3, 2018
    http://news.mit.edu/2018/fasting-boosts-stem-cells-regenerative-capacity-0503

    Fasting Activates Fatty Acid Oxidation to Enhance Intestinal Stem Cell Function during Homeostasis and Aging.
    Mihaylova MM, Cheng CW, Cao AQ, Tripathi S, Mana MD, Bauer-Rowe KE, Abu-Remaileh M, Clavain L, Erdemir A, Lewis CA, Freinkman E, Dickey AS, La Spada AR, Huang Y, Bell GW, Deshpande V, Carmeliet P, Katajisto P, Sabatini DM, Yilmaz ÖH.
    Cell Stem Cell. 2018 May 3;22(5):769-778.e4. doi: 10.1016/j.stem.2018.04.001.
    https://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/fulltext/S1934-5909(18)30163-2

    Mitogenic influence of human R-spondin1 on the intestinal epithelium.
    Kim KA, Kakitani M, Zhao J, Oshima T, Tang T, Binnerts M, Liu Y, Boyle B, Park E, Emtage P, Funk WD, Tomizuka K.
    Science. 2005 Aug 19;309(5738):1256-9.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16109882

    Nuvelo, Inc. Announces Positive Results from Phase 1 Clinical Trial of NU206 in Healthy Volunteers.
    Published: Dec 10, 2008
    https://www.biospace.com/article/releases/nuvelo-inc-announces-positive-results-from-phase-1-clinical-trial-of-nu206-in-healthy-volunteers-/?keywords=nu206

    Anti-inflammatory mechanism of dieting and fasting revealed.
    By Karen N. Peart
    February 16, 2015
    https://news.yale.edu/2015/02/16/anti-inflammatory-mechanism-dieting-and-fasting-revealed

    Master detox molecule boosts immune defenses.
    Scientists discover an unknown immune mechanism.
    April 18, 2017
    https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2017/04/170418120923.htm

    Glutathione Primes T Cell Metabolism for Inflammation.
    Mak TW, Grusdat M, Duncan GS, Dostert C, Nonnenmacher Y, Cox M, Binsfeld C, Hao Z, Brüstle A, Itsumi M, Jager C, Chen Y, Pinkenburg O, Camara B, Ollert M, Bindslev-Jensen C, Vasiliou V, Gorrini C, Lang PA, Lohoff M, Harris IS, Hiller K, Brenner D.
    Immunity. 2017 Apr 18;46(4):675-689. doi: 10.1016/j.immuni.2017.03.019.
    https://www.cell.com/immunity/fulltext/S1074-7613(17)30129-2

    The effect of fasting on leukocyte and plasma glutathione and sulfur amino acid concentrations.
    Martensson J.
    Metabolism. 1986 Feb;35(2):118-21.
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/3945186

    Fasting triggers stem cell regeneration of damaged, old immune system
    BY Suzanne Wu - USC News
    June 5, 2014
    https://news.usc.edu/63669/fasting-triggers-stem-cell-regeneration-of-damaged-old-immune-system/

    Prolonged Fasting Reduces IGF-1/PKA to Promote Hematopoietic-Stem-Cell-Based Regeneration and Reverse Immunosuppression
    Chia-Wei Cheng, Gregor B. Adams, Laura Perin, Min Wei, Xiaoying Zhou, Ben S. Lam, Stefano Da Sacco, Mario Mirisola, David I. Quinn, Tanya B. Dorff, John J. Kopchick, Valter D. Longo
    Cell Stem Cell. 2014 Jun 5; 14(6): 810-823.
    https://www.cell.com/cell-stem-cell/fulltext/S1934-5909(14)00151-9
    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4102383/

    Jefferson Adams
    Dietary Gluten Intake Does Not Increase Risk of Microscopic Colitis Among US Women Without Celiac Disease
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Jason Taellious
    Celiac.com 09/27/2018 - Microscopic colitis is a frequent culprit in cases of chronic watery diarrhea among elderly patients. Although patients with microscopic colitis seem to have higher rates of celiac disease, researchers haven’t done much research on the relationship between dietary gluten consumption, and risk of microscopic colitis in people who do not have celiac disease.
    A team of researchers recently prepared a prospective study of US women without celiac disease. The research team included Po-Hong Liu MD, MPH; Benjamin Lebwohl MD, MS; Kristin E. Burke MD; Kerry L. Ivey PhD; Ashwin N. Ananthakrishnan MBBS, MPH; Paul Lochhead MBChB, PhD; Ola Olen MD, PhD; Jonas F. Ludvigsson MD, PhD; James M. Richter MD; Andrew T. Chan MD, MPH; & Hamed Khalili MD, MPH. 
    The research team studied 160,744 US women without celiac disease who were enrolled in the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) and the NHSII. They then estimated dietary gluten intake using validated food frequency questionnaires at four year intervals. They confirmed cases of microscopic colitis through a review of medical records. The team used Cox proportional hazard modeling to estimate the multivariable-adjusted hazard ratio (HR) and 95% confidence interval (CI).
    The researchers found 219 cases of microscopic colitis over more than 20 years of follow-up covering 3,716,718 person-years, for a crude incidence rate of 5.9 cases per 100,000 person-years, in NHS and NHSII. 
    Most significantly, they found that dietary gluten intake did not influence the risk of developing microscopic colitis. Compared to individuals in the lowest quintile of energy-adjusted gluten intake, the adjusted HR of microscopic colitis was 1.18 for the middle quintile and 1.03 for the highest quintile. 
    Even adjusting the figures to account for primary gluten sources, including refined and whole grains, made no substantial difference in the effect estimates. Further, there was no difference in association rates according to lymphocytic or collagenous subtypes; nor were the rates changed by age, smoking status, or body mass index.
    The good news from this study is that gluten intake plays no role in promoting microscopic colitis in adult women without celiac disease.
    Read more at: The American Journal of Gastroenterology (2018)

    Jefferson Adams
    Report Highlights the Challenges of Diagnosing Non-celiac Gluten Sensitivity
    Image Caption: Image: CC--David Goehring
    Celiac.com 09/26/2018 - Non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) is a clinical syndrome marked by both intestinal and extra-intestinal symptoms that respond to the elimination of gluten-containing food and the adoption of a gluten-free diet. 
    A team of researchers recently set out to review the diagnostic challenges surrounding non-celiac gluten sensitivity, and to summarize recent advances in research and provide a brief overview of the history of the condition for the benefit of professionals working in gastroenterology. 
    The research team included Giovanni Casella, Vincenzo Villanacci, Camillo Di Bella, Gabrio Bassotti, Justine Bold, and Kamran Rostami. They are variously affiliated with General Practioner National Health Italy; the Institute of Pathology Spedali Civili Brescia Italy; the Pathology Department, Carate Brianza Hospital, ASST-Vimercate (Monza Brianza), Italy; the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Section of the Department of Medicine at the University of Perugia School of Medicine in Perugia, Italy; the Department of Gastroenterology Milton Keynes University Hospital, Milton Keynes, UK; and with Allied Health and Social Sciences, University of Worcester, UK.
    The researchers searched academic databases such as PubMed and Google Scholar using key words like ”non-celiac gluten sensitivity,” “gluten related disorders,” and the studies outlined in reference page were selected and analyzed.
    Clinical opinion generally holds that NCGS is best diagnosed by ruling out celiac disease and wheat allergy. Currently there is no blood test that can pinpoint NCGS.
    The underlying causes of symptoms in NCGS patients is poorly understood. However, there have been a few recent insights. Professional estimates of NCGS rates currently vary between 0.6 and 6%. Gastrointestinal symptoms of NCGS overlap slightly with those of irritable bowel syndrome.
    Researchers are currently investigating the histologic characteristics of NCGS, which range from normal histology to slightly elevated rates of T lymphocytes in the superficial epithelium of villi.  Positive response to gluten free diet for up to 6 weeks, followed by a recurrence of symptoms after a gluten challenge, is still the best confirmation of NCGS.
    The Salerno expert criteria may help to accurately diagnose NCGS, especially in research settings, but isn’t particularly useful for diagnosis in clinical practice.
    Source:
    Gastroenterol Hepatol Bed Bench 2018;11(3):197-202).

    Jefferson Adams
    General Mills Gluten-Free Oats Patent Could Be a Game Changer
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Steve McLaughlin
    Celiac.com 09/25/2018 - In a patent application that could have a huge impact on the gluten-free industry, General Mills, Inc. has described its method and system for removing foreign, gluten-containing grains to establish gluten-free oats. Current FDA guidelines require all products labeled gluten-free to have a maximum gluten content of 20 parts per million (ppm). 
    Published August 23rd, patent application No. US 20180236453 A1 details a method for producing oat grains with gluten levels below 20 ppm and, more preferably, below 10 ppm. 
    Natural oats generally do not contain gluten, but after harvest, transport and storage, large batches of raw oats may contain small amounts of gluten-containing grains, such as wheat, barley, rye and triticale. These can sometimes occur at levels exceeding 20 ppm.
    The General Mills patent application describes a method of arranging mechanical oat sorting operations in series, or in both series and parallel operations. The multi-step process best includes width grading, multiple length grading steps, along with a potential de-bearding step.
    The resulting oats will be gluten-free to under 20 ppm, and possibly to under 10 ppm, and are suitable for the production of  gluten-free oat food products, including cereals and granolas.
    To receive a patent, General Mills will have to prove that their process does what they say it does. A successful patent for General Mills could have a huge effect on the gluten-free oat foods industry. For one, it may allow General Mills to become a major supplier of gluten-free oats for other manufacturers. 
    The benefits of larger scale, more economical gluten-free oat production could include more, and more readily available, gluten-free oat products, along with lower prices for both manufacturers and consumers. Stay tuned for more developments on this and related stories.
    Read more at Justicia.com

    Jefferson Adams
    AN-PEP Successfully Degrades Gluten in Rye Sourdough Products
    Image Caption: Image: CC--jeffreyw
    Celiac.com 09/24/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to investigate the degradation of gluten in rye sourdough products by means of a proline-specific peptidase.
    The research team included Theresa Walter, Herbert Wieser, and Peter Koehler, with the Deutsche Forschungsanstalt für Lebensmittelchemie, Leibniz Institut in Freising, Germany.
    Their team monitored gluten content of rye sourdough during fermentation using competitive ELISA based on the R5 antibody. The team noted a decrease in gluten over time, but found that even prolonged fermentation did not bring gluten levels below 20 ppm requirement for gluten-free foods. 
    Interestingly, they did find that Aspergillus niger prolyl endopeptidase (AN-PEP) extensively degraded gluten concentrations of up to 80,000 mg/kg in rye flour, rye sourdough, and sourdough starter under specific temperatures and pH values. Nor did the enzyme inactivate the microorganisms in the sourdough starter. 
    Gluten-free rye flour alone or in combination with sourdough starter was used to produce gluten-free bread, which the team then assessed for its sensory characteristics. 
    Whereas gluten-free sourdough bread lacked any of the favorable qualities of conventional rye bread, the replacement of sourdough by egg proteins yielded gluten-free bread comparable to the conventional rye, and with better qualities than bread made with naturally gluten-free ingredients. 
    This study demonstrates the feasibility of using ANPEP treatment to produce high-quality gluten-free sourdough bread from originally gluten-containing cereals, such as rye. 
    Rye products rendered gluten-free in this manner have the potential to increase the choice of high-quality foods for celiac patients. 
    Source:
    European Food Research and TechnologyMarch 2015, Volume 240, Issue 3, pp 517–524

    Jefferson Adams
    Summertime Peach Caprese Salad (Gluten-Free)
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Ron Cogswell
    Celiac.com 09/22/2018 - We’ve done recipes for Caprese salad. We’ve done recipes for peaches. We’ve never done one for peach Caprese salad.
    This gluten-free treat adds fresh peaches for a sweet summery-sweet twist on classic Caprese salad. Easy to make and wonderfully tasty, this recipe is sure to be a hit at your next barbecue or grill session.
    Ingredients:
    1 ripe tomato 1 ripe peach 12-14 leaves of fresh basil 6 oz. ball fresh mozzarella Balsamic vinegar Extra virgin olive oil Directions:
    Slice tomato, peach and mozzarella into ½″ slices.
    Layer the tomato, peach and cheese slices with whole leaves of fresh basil.
    Drizzle with extra virgin olive and balsamic vinegar.
    Season with salt and pepper. 

    Lindsay Cochrane
    Living with Celiac Disease in South Korea
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Republic of Korea
    Celiac.com 09/21/2018 - The English as a Second Language (ESL) pie is so large in countries such as South Korea that there seem to be enough helpings for anyone interested. However, these generous slices may be off limits to individuals with severe food allergies or intolerances, including those with celiac disease. If you have diet restrictions and are thinking of heading to South Korea or another Asian country, the following information will help you decide whether or not this move is a good idea.
    One might think that Asia, the land of rice-based meals, would be a celiac’s paradise. As one naïve dietician told me before I moved to Seoul, “You couldn’t be going to a better place.” This assumption could not be further from the truth. If cooked with traditional ingredients, many local dishes are gluten-free. However, in Korea, wheat flour is now cheaper than other kinds of flour, despite the fact that it has to be imported. Wheat flour and barley are currently the two most common ingredients in Korean food products.
    In Korea, eleven major food allergens must be included on product labels: poultry eggs, milk, buckwheat, peanuts, soybean, wheat, mackerel, crab, pork, peaches, and tomatoes. As for anything else, the Korean Food and Drug Administration states that only the five major ingredients in a product have to be labeled. Furthermore, a label need only include intentional ingredients, not things accidentally mixed into a product through cross-contamination. So you can say goodbye to warnings like: “this product may contain traces of peanuts.” Stricter labeling regulations will be put into effect in September 2006. However, these laws will remain less stringent than those in North America and Europe. According to a source at the KFDA, labeling restrictions are similar in Japan and more lax in China and South East Asia.
    One can easily learn Korean for “I’m allergic to ____” in any phrasebook or from a Korean coworker, friend, or even the guy in the next seat on your Korean Air flight. Yet it is the cultural barrier, not the language barrier, which poses the most difficulties for a celiac.
    Korean culture revolves around the sharing of food due to food shortages during the Japanese occupation; Koreans do not ask, “How are you?” but, “Have you had your meal?” Co-workers, friends, and even the occasional stranger will offer to share food. The politest way to refuse is by saying, “Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic.” Also, rather than saying you are allergic to something in Korean—allerugi—it is much more effective to say you cannot have it. (see the list of useful phrases). Unfortunately, even these statements are unlikely to be fully effective when eating Korean food. Many Koreans are completely unaware that frequently-used ingredients such as tashida soup flavouring and soybean powder contain wheat.
    Most Koreans I spoke with were shocked to hear that, as a celiac, I could not eat food which had so much as touched gluten. Generally, they assume that people with food allergies are still able to consume a product with a 1-2% trace of the allergen. Food allergies, celiac disease, vegetarianism, and other kinds of diet restrictions are rare in this country and are not taken very seriously. Furthermore, according to gastroenterologist Dr. Kim of Severance Hospital in Seoul, only two people were ever diagnosed with celiac disease in Korea.
    The world of North American restaurants, where servers cater to those with food allergies, food sensitivities, and plain old picky eaters, is very far away. Koreans generally order what is on the menu without making any special requests. Even Westerners who learn enough of the Korean language to explain their diets often end up being served something they asked specifically not to have. Furthermore, Korean food is not served on personal plates: everyone at the table reaches his or her chopsticks into the various communal dishes, causing cross-contamination.
    I was at a restaurant with some Korean friends and was trying to explain my gluten-intolerance to them, when one young man told me he was so sensitive to peaches that he could not so much as touch a peach without breaking out into a rash. Five minutes later I saw him eat a dish containing peach slices. This is the attitude of Koreans to food allergies—both theirs and yours.
    The gluten-free meal which is safest and easiest to find in Korea is samgyupsal. This dish features fatty, thick slices of pork cooked over a clean grill right at your table. Just make sure that all sauces are kept off the grill. Bibimbop is a rice, vegetable, and egg dish usually served with kochujang, a red pepper paste which unfortunately contains wheat. Bibimbop can be ordered, however, with the kochujang on the side.
    Most foreigners are in Korea to work rather than visit, and having an apartment provides the extra advantage of having one’s own cooking space. There are a few of us who have managed the gluten-free diet in Korea. However, it has not been easy. If you have celiac disease or food allergies and are thinking of moving to this part of the world, I can guarantee you that it will be a monumental challenge.
    Useful Korean phrases:
    Thank you, but I can’t. I’m allergic: kamsa hamnida man, allerugi issoyo. I cannot have barley, rye, or wheat: chonun pori hago homil hago mil motmuhgeyo. Barley: pori Wheat: mil Rye: homil Bibimbop with the red pepper paste on the side: bibimbop kochujang garu Grilled Pork: samgyupsal

    Jefferson Adams
    What’s the Deal with Gluten Sniffing Dogs?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--David Kessler
    Celiac.com 09/20/2018 - Some people with celiac disease experience extreme symptoms when they eat gluten. These folks adopt various strategies for navigating the world. One of those strategies involves getting a gluten-sniffing service dog.
    We’ve done a few stories on gluten-sniffing dogs over the years. Dogs like Zeus and Hawkeye are famous for helping their owners sniff out gluten before they can eat it.
    Can Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Help People with Celiac Disease?  The stories are always popular. People love the stories, and people love the dogs. After all, pretty much anyone with celiac disease who has ever read about gluten-sniffing dogs would love to have one. Who could say no to a warm, fuzzy dog that can take a sniff of your food and signal you when it contains gluten?
    The stories almost always generate plenty of feedback and more than a few questions. To answer some of those questions, we’ve decided to do an article that provides some facts about gluten-sniffing dogs.
    Here are a few factors to keep in mind about gluten-sniffing service dogs:
    Gluten-free Dog Status:
    One thing to remember is that proper gluten-sniffing dogs are professionally trained service animals, much like seeing-eye dogs or hearing-ear dogs. 
    As professional service animals, the dogs must be trained and certified as service animals. The dogs may then accompany their master pretty much anywhere they go, and are available to assess all food and snacks.
    Gluten-free Dog Training:
    Proper training takes time, which equals money. Professional trainers might only train one or two dogs, and the training can take about a year. There are very few trainers for gluten-sniffing dogs, and there are also currently no official guidelines or certification.
    Gluten-free Dog Cost:
    In our recent story on the gluten-sniffing black Lab, Hawkeye, we noted that the dog cost $16,000, not including food, and vet bills. 
    Gluten-free Dog Reliability:
    Nimasensor.com notes that “[g]luten-sniffing dogs may detect gluten in amounts as small as .0025 parts per million with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy.”
    The Mercola.com website says that Willow, a gluten-sniffing German shorthaired pointer in Michigan, can detect gluten with 95 percent to 98 percent accuracy. 
    Read more on gluten-sniffing dogs:
    Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Are Game Changers for People With Celiac Disease Gluten-sniffing dogs help people with celiac disease What to Know About Gluten-Sniffing Dogs Gluten-Sniffing Assistance Dog Helps Celiac Sufferer Lead Normal Life

    Jefferson Adams
    The Girl Scouts Adds New Gluten-Free Cookie to Popular Lineup
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Deanna Davis
    Celiac.com 09/19/2018 - Great news for gluten-free cookies lovers!  Girl Scouts has announced the debut of a new gluten-free cookie to its enormously popular cookie brand. 
    The new Caramel Chocolate Chip is a chewy cookie that contains caramel, semi-sweet chocolate chips, and a hint of sea salt. also happens to be gluten-free. The new gluten-free treat will be available in select areas during the 2019 cookie-selling season; which typically runs from February to April each year.
    The gluten-free Caramel Chocolate Chip joins the Girl Scouts’ two other gluten-free offerings: Toffee-tastic, a buttery cookie with sweet and crunchy golden toffee bits, and Trios, a peanut butter oatmeal cookie with chocolate chips. 
    The Girl Scouts of America has been around for over 100 years and now hosts more than 1.8 million girl members. Every year, about 100 million scouts between the ages of five and 18 sell approximately 200 million boxes of cookies nationwide. According to the Girl Scouts website, that money stays local to develop local leadership training activities, summer camps, and more activities.
    According to a 2016 study conducted by the Girl Scout Research Institute, approximately 85% of Girl Scouts surveyed said that Girl Scout Cookie Program helped them learn how to set goals and meet deadlines, while 88% said it helped them become effective decision-makers. Another 88% said they learned how to manage money, while 94% said the program helped them to learn business ethics.
    The Girl Scouts have also added online sales and iOS and Android apps that allow people to find cookies or order from their phones.

    Jefferson Adams
    No Gluten-Free Diet for Tennis Champion Roger Federer
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Justin Smith
    Celiac.com 09/18/2018 - With a number of major tennis stars singing the praises of a gluten-free diet, including top players like Novak Djokovic, Swiss great Roger Federer weighed in on the topic.
    The 20-time Grand Slam winner says that he’s never tried the gluten-free diet, and that he doesn’t not “even know what that all means…I eat healthy, and I think that's what people should do, too, if they have the options. It's sure important the right diet for an athlete.”
    Djokovic, the 2018 US Open winner has been gluten-free since 2011, and calls the diet his biggest key to his success.
    For Federer, diet is helpful, but not the whole story. “[Diet] can help you, you know. I mean, I think every athlete should be in good shape. I don't think we should have any fat athletes, to be honest. We do too much sports and we should be too professional to let that happen to ourselves.
    If it happens, well, we should wake up. You don't have the right entourage. They're not telling you that you're a bit fat. Players try different things, and whatever works for them. I do my thing. It's been very easy and natural and healthy, and it's worked.”
    So, while Novak Djokovic, and a number of other athletes, have gone gluten-free and continue to tout the benefits, look for Federer to remain faithful to his generally nutritious non-gluten-free diet.
    Read more at: TennisWorldUSA.org

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    • Maureen and Cyclinglady, Of the foods you listed. . .. I would focus on the Chocolate. Chocolate has Tyramine in it and it could/can cause rashes that  might be confused for DH. Sometimes Tyramine get's confused for/in high sulfite foods as triggers. Here is a great overview article on this topic. http://www.chicagotribune.com/lifestyles/health/sc-red-wine-headache-health-0608-20160525-story.html you might also have trouble with headaches if it tyramine is causing you your trouble. People who have trouble Tyramine might also have trouble with consuming cheeses. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2738414/ As for the Milk causing/triggering your DH don't rule Adult onset dairy allergy. While rare it does occur in the literature/research when you search it out. I am including the research here in the hopes it might help you or someone else entitled "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1398-9995.1996.tb04640.x It is generally thought most of grow out of a Milk Allergy at approx. 3 years old. But for some lucky one (I guess) we never do apparently.  (I speak for my friend on this board JMG).  He found out he was having trouble with dairy as an adult better never realized until about 6 months ago. With delayed onset allergies it is often hard to tell if it (allergen) is effecting us because we might not associate it with our dairy consumption because it might happen a day or two latter. See this WHFoods article about food allergens/sensitivies.  It is very long/exhaustive but it is very helpful if you have time to study it in more detail. http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?pfriendly=1&tname=faq&dbid=30 I will quote some key points for your information. Symptoms of Food Allergies "The most common symptoms for food allergies include vomiting, diarrhea, blood in stools, eczema, hives, skin rashes, wheezing and a runny nose. Symptoms can vary depending upon a number of variables including age, the type of allergen (antigen), and the amount of food consumed. It may be difficult to associate the symptoms of an allergic reaction to a particular food because the response time can be highly variable. For example, an allergic response to eating fish will usually occur within minutes after consumption in the form of a rash, hives or asthma or a combination of these symptoms. However, the symptoms of an allergic reaction to cow's milk may be delayed for 24 to 48 hours after consuming the milk; these symptoms may also be low-grade and last for several days. If this does not make diagnosis difficult enough, reactions to foods made from cow's milk may also vary depending on how it was produced and the portion of the milk to which you are allergic. Delayed allergic reactions to foods are difficult to identify without eliminating the food from your diet for at least several weeks and slowly reintroducing it while taking note of any physical, emotional or mental changes as it is being reintroduced." Here is their information on Tyramine's. Tyramine "Reactions to tyramine (an amino acid-like molecule) or phenylalanine (another amino acid-like molecule) can result from eating the following foods: Fermented cheeses Fermented Sausage Chocolate Sour Cream Red wine Avocado Beer Raspberries Yeast Picked Herring Symptoms of tyramine intolerance can include urticaria (hives), angioedema (localized swelling due to fluid retention), migraines, wheezing, and even asthma. In fact, some researchers suggest that as many as 20 percent of migraines are caused by food intolerance or allergy, and tyramine intolerance is one of the most common of these toxic food responses." Here is an old thread on tyramine and especially how it can trigger headaches. https://www.celiac.com/forums/topic/95457-headache-culprit-is-tyramine/ I would also suggest your research a low histamine food diet.  Rashes/hives etc. can be triggered my disregulaton of histamine in the body. The other thing in chocolate that might be causing your problems is Sulfites. Here is a website dedicated to a Sulftie allergy. http://www.allergy-details.com/sulfites/foods-contain-sulfites/ Chocolate bars are on their list of sulfite contaning foods but probably most noted in dried fruits and red wine. Knitty Kitty on this board knows alot about a sulfite allergy. I want to go back to the possible dairy allergy for a second as a possible trigger. . .because it has been established as connected to DH . . .it is just not well known. Here is current research (as I said earlier) most dairy allergies are studied in children but it does occur in approx. 10 pct of the GP unless your of Asian descent where it is much more common. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29555204 quoting the new research from this year on children. "When CMP (Cow's Milk Protein) was re-introduced, anti-tTG increased, and returned to normal after the CMP was withdrawn again." and if adults can also (though rarely) it seem develop "Adult onset of cow's milk protein allergy with small‐intestinal mucosal IgE mast cells" (see research linked above) as the research shows  you should at least trial removing dairy from your diet if you haven't already and see if your DH doesn't come back when you re-introduce it. It just takes 15 or 20 years for medical doctor' to incorporate new research/thinking into clinical practice.  And note the research on this happening in adults is 20+ years old and as far I know doctor's . . . are not aware of this.  I know I wasn't until recently and I research things alot of to help myself and my friends. But I know you can't do what you don't know about.  So this is why I am trying to share what I learned so that other might be helped and this research might not  lay hidden another 20 years before doctor's and their Celiac/DH patients become aware of it. And if it helps you come back on the board and let us know so it can help others too! If it helps you it will/can help someone else! if they know it helped you then they will/can have hope it might help them too and why I share and research these things for others'. . . who don't know or don't have time to research this for themselves. I hope this is helpful but it is not medical advice. Good luck on your continued journey. I know this is a lot of information to digest at one time but I hope at least some of if it helpful and you at least have a better idea of what in your chocolate could be causing your DH (idiopathic) as the doctor's say (of an unknown cause mild) DH symptom's. Or at least it is not commonly known yet that Milk can also cause trigger (DH) in children and adults who have a Milk allergy undiagnosed. . .because we don't don't typically think  or associate it with adults like maybe we should if we are not of Asian descent. Maureen if this doesn't help you you might want to start a thread in the DH section of the forum. As always  2 Timothy 2: 7   “Consider what I say; and the Lord give thee understanding in all things” this included. Posterboy by the grace of God,
    • I hooe you can get some answers with your new GI doc.
    • Many of us deal with doctor issues and diagnosis, you got a really bad draw indeed. Most doctors dismiss Celiac as their is no money in the cure for them IE a gluten free diet and not medications.

      Keep up updated on your new doctor and testing, good to see you finally found one that listens and can help, I got through on doc #5 I think it was.
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