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    Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    A Victory for Gluten-Free Beer

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/11/2009 - When is a beer not a beer? When it's gluten-free. Until now.

    Beer perpetually hovers near the top of most celiac lists of things they'd love to have if they could. Until recently, the regulation of labels for beer, wine and spirits fell to a little known government agency called the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.



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    Because their regulations relied on the Federal Alcohol Administration Act of 1935, which defined beer as a beverage brewed from malted barley and other grains, gluten-free beers did not meet the strict definition, and could not therefore be labeled as 'gluten-free beer,' as no such standard existed.

    That situation has changed, and the Food and Drug Administration is now charged with the regulation of beer labels. Because of this, gluten-free beer can now be labeled 'gluten-free beer' instead of 'sorghum beer' or 'beer made without wheat or barley', or some such silliness.

    That's good news for the nation's estimated two million sufferers of celiac disease, and the many, many more who are gluten intolerant. For these folks, consuming any kind of product containing wheat, rye or barley can cause chronic diarrhea, arthritis, bone loss and a raft of other symptoms.

    In people with celiac disease, the immune system reacts to gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye and barley, which causes inflammation in their gut and interfers with the absorption of nutrients.

    All traditional beers are brewed with malted barley and contain gluten. However, specialty micro brewers began making beer from malted sorghum, an African grain, and sometimes rice. Anheuser-Busch followed later with its own sorghum beer. Beers brewed with sorghum and rice are gluten free, which is great for celiacs, but was not in line with the Federal Alcohol Administration Act of 1935, which defines beer as a beverage brewed from malted barley and other grains.

    So even though it looked, smelled and tasted like beer, the amber, foamy and distinctly beer-like beverage did not count as beer under the rules. Which is why last July 7, 2008, the FDA and TTB agreed that FDA would take over regulation.

    The FDAs Guidance for Industry covers all non-barley beers. So, in a great development for all of the celiac and gluten-intolerant folks out there, these beers can now officially be labeled gluten-free once they've been tested and confirmed by FDA.

    The guidelines give brewers of gluten-free beers until Jan. 1, 2012, to begin adding nutrition labels to their beverages, including a declaration of major food allergens, wheat.

    Up until now, people with celiac disease and gluten intolerance could not be sure that their gluten-free beer was actually safe and gluten-free. Now FDA regulations have established a standard.

    According to Elaine Monarch, executive director of the Celiac Disease Foundation, accurate labels will provide a measure of assurance for celiacs, and possibly make it easier for European gluten-free beverages to enter the market.

    Gluten-free beer is a small, but steadily growing sector of the beer market, with a present market share of under 0.1%, according to Paul Gatza of the Brewers Association in Boulder, Colorado. Still, growth for some brands runs upward of 35% per year. The biggest gluten-free beer players are Anheuser-Busch, which makes Red Bridge, Lakefront Brewery's New Grist, and Bard's Tail.

     



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    What a wonderful thing! Redbridge does taste exactly like beer to me, so why shouldn't it be called beer! Cheers!

    Red Bridge is good---was very glad when I found it ---- I just had the opportunity to enjoy the Bard's and it was very good also.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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    Scott Adams
    The following report was prepared by Ann Whalen, celiac, and editor/publisher of Gluten-Free Living , which is a bimonthly newsletter for celiacs - Gluten-Free Living, PO Box 105, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706.
    On March 10th, more than 20 members of the celiac community and celiac disease specialists (see list at end) attended a meeting of the Digestive Diseases Intra-agency Coordinating Committee, a part of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK).
    The meeting, held to update the current status of Celiac Disease, was chaired by Jay Hoofnagle, M.D., Director of the Division of Digestive Diseases and Nutrition at the NIDDK. At the meeting, presentations were made by Martin Kagnoff, M.D., Joseph Murray, M.D., Alessio Fasano, M.D., and Frank Hamilton, M.D.
    Dr. Kagnoff is a gastroenterologist and Professor of Medicine at the University of California, San Diego. He spoke about his research into the genetics of Celiac Disease, focusing on the pathogenesis. Dr. Kagnoff is well known for his research into the genetics of Celiac Disease, and several of his studies have been funded by the NIH.
    Dr. Murray, Associate Professor of Medicine and clinician at the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, described his experience with Celiac Disease both in Iowa and in Ireland, noting that his interest in celiac disease is clinical. He emphasized what he called the Classic II symptoms, meaning the actual symptoms patients have today and not the Classic symptoms many doctors may be familiar with. He said the rate of diagnosis is proportional to suspicion.
    Dr. Murray described the celiac disease experience at the University of Iowa from 1985 to 1997, presenting statistics that indicated a steep increase in diagnosis. At our institution, Celiac Disease is an adult disease, he said, and is now seen as frequently as Crohns Disease.
    Anticipating the question, Why look for Celiac Disease?, Dr. Murray gave his reasons: preventing lymphoma and osteoporosis, as well as resolving fatigue and nonspecific symptoms and shortening the current significant delays in diagnosis.
    Dr. Fasanos presentation was called Where Have All the American Celiacs Gone? He described what has happened in the field of celiac disease in various parts of the world, including some parts of the United States, but emphasized the European experience. Dr. Fasano noted that plans are already underway in Italy to screen all seven-year-olds in 1999.
    Dr. Fasano explained why an epidemiology study is critically needed in this country. He pointed out the benefits of such a study for four groups:
    The American health care community: lower health care costs, increased awareness of celiac disease and more knowledge of its protein manifestations in the US Participating physicians: publications, more patients and increased credibility. The American people: the prevalence will be established and celiac disease will be diagnosed more quickly. Celiac Patients: free screening of first-degree relatives, federal support for dietary and drug regulations, an improved food supply, stronger local support groups and more funding for celiac research. Dr. Fasano added that such a study, whatever its findings, would end in a win-win situation for everyone. If the study shows that celiac disease is underestimated in this country, patients will benefit as physicians begin looking for the problem with the knowledge that they might well find it. If the study shows celiac disease is indeed rare in the United States, its even more exciting because we will be able to figure out why.
    Dr. Hamilton, chief of the Digestive Diseases Program Branch at the NIDDK, briefly described the celiac disease research, to date, that has already been funded by the NIH. He said $1.4 million has been granted for such research, adding that over the last five years, we have seen growth in the funding of Celiac Disease. He said he was pleased funding has increased, and felt a lot of work has to be done.
    Dr. Hamilton ended by saying, Todays meeting will serve as an impetus for a partnership between the National Institutes of Health, academe, and the lay groups to foster more research. He added that it was important for the investigators and support group representatives present at the meeting to get the word out, referring to information about Celiac Disease.
    These talks were followed by a round table discussion, between the members of the committee and the presenters. Later, audience comment was invited. The committee showed an interest in the current adult nature of the disease, the changing symptoms, current testing methods, and identification of the most critical research needs. Patients who spoke were anxious to let the committee know what they felt were the important concerns in the real world.
    At the end of the meeting, Dr. Hoofnagle said his division will prepare a short, pithy plan, then present it to Drs. Kagnoff, Murray and Fasano. He noted that the important issues are pathogenesis, delivering the message to physicians, clinical research issues and pediatric health concern.
    Some Quotes from the Meeting
    Elaine Monarch: There is a general lack of knowledge, awareness and interest in Celiac Disease among the medical profession. We celiacs can go for years with substantial symptoms but not diagnosis...The cost to the medical community is enormous.
    Joseph Murray, M.D.: There is more than one gene involved in Celiac Disease. Most Europeans are homogenous. Here we have a mongrelized population. What happens when you mix? How much does it change? Our mongrelized population may be at risk at a later age.
    Martin Kagnoff, M.D.: The issue of other genes is not at all clear. Like Joe (Dr. Murray), I see adult celiacs. Their time delay to diagnosis is not exaggerated, but what is striking is the lack of knowledge of doctors, even at the University of California. They really are not aware of this disease.
    Alessio Fasano, M.D.: We receive 10-15 calls a day. The vast majority are self diagnosed. They say, I know more than my gastroenterologist.
    Peter Green, M.D.: We need to emphasize education of gastroenterologists. At my institution (Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City), doctors are not used to looking at the duodenum...We need to educate many levels of the medical community and tell them, If you dont recognize something, take a biopsy.
    Sue Goldstein: Im concerned about the people who have not yet been diagnosed and the reasons why a physician wont consider Celiac Disease. It all boils down to, its rare and you cant have it.
    In addition to the speakers, the following were among those who attended:
    Phyllis Brogden, celiac, founder and chairperson of the Greater Philadelphia Celiac Sprue Support Group. Winnie Feldman, celiac, Celiac Disease Foundation Kenneth Fine, M.D., gastroenterologist/ researcher at Baylor University Medical Center in Dallas. Al Fornace, M.D., celiac, National Cancer Institute Sue Goldstein, celiac, founder and advisor, Westchester Celiac Sprue Support Group Peter Green, M.D., clinician/researcher at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center in New York City. Joanne Hameister, celiac, former chairperson, Western New York Gluten-Free Support Group Ivor Hill, M.D., clinician/researcher at Bowman Gray School of Medicine, Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Beth Hillson, celiac and proprietor of the Gluten-Free Pantry. Karoly Horvath, M.D., clinician/researcher at the University of Maryland School of Medicine in Baltimore. Marge Johanamen, celiac, CSA Kentucky state coordinator Pam King, University of Maryland Bob Levy, Celiac Research Foundation Ruth Levy, spouse Jax Lowell, celiac and author of Against the Grain Elaine Monarch, celiac, founder and Executive Director of the Celiac Disease Foundation Selwyn J. Monarch, Board of Directors, CDF Diane Paley, celiac, governing board CSA/USA Michelle Pietzak, M.D., pediatric gastroenterologist at Childrens Hospital, Los Angeles Connie Tur, celiac, president Greater Louisville Celiac Sprue Support Group


    Scott Adams
    The History - By Pam King, University of Maryland Center for Celiac Research
    This article originally appeared in the Autumn 2003 edition of Celiac.coms Scott-Free Newsletter.
    Celiac.com 01/20/2004 - One of the primary missions of the Center for Celiac Research (CCR) at the University of Maryland is to increase the awareness of celiac disease, and we are constantly trying to do just that. We have been pitching the celiac story to all sorts of media venues for the past five years. There have been many, many phone calls—sometimes with success. For years, we wanted the big headline, but the media wasnt quite ready. This year everything changed. We had a BIG story to tell, and not even a snowstorm or blackout was going to stop us from making the headlines.
    Lets begin in February, 2003. A major press conference was planned for February 13th, to announce the publication of the Prevalence Study in the Archives of Internal Medicine. We spent seven months of detailed planning with the media, patients and parents, and when the day finally arrived, it was accompanied by a major snowstorm. The press conference did happen, but a number of the press was sidetracked to cover the snowstorm. This, however, did not prevent celiac disease from appearing on the front page of the Washington Post, as well as in numerous other big city newspapers. Since then news of the prevalence study has appeared on local television newscasts, and in the Wall Street Journal.
    Then after five years of telephone calls and preparation, the call came: The NBC Today Show was ready to cover celiac disease! Over the next several months, we worked with the producer to arrange meeting times and to suggest individuals who could make the segment as informative as possible. The Today Show producer and crew spent a full day filming and interviewing at the CCR. Four days, and four cities (Boston, Baltimore, Alexandria, and Washington, DC) later, all taping was finished and the editing began.
    Two weeks later, word came that the celiac segment would air on Friday, August 15th. The producer was careful to mention that the segment would air unless there was a major news story occurring on that day. We pondered what kind of story that might be, and as luck would have it, we received a call at 4 PM on August 14: "Have you seen the news, theres a black out in New York". Jokingly, we replied: "Cant you come up with something better than that?" Quickly typing on the internet to get into CNN we found that major story, which threatened to bump celiac disease off of the show.
    Behind the Scenes - by Andrea Levario, American Celiac Task Force
    It was a normal July Tuesday morning, sitting staring at a computer screen, sipping coffee—until I answered a call from Meredith Klein, a producer for NBCs Today Show. The call was a first in a series, thanks to all of the hard work by Pam King at the University of Marylands Center for Celiac Research. Knowing Dr. Fasano would address all of the medical details, Pam sought to ensure that the issue of food labels was also covered—thus, being the co-chair of the American Celiac Task Force I was being quizzed about labeling legislation, my sons diagnosis, and what time a crew could arrive to tape on Friday.
    Just before lunch on August 1st, the two-man crew, and Meredith, the producer, arrived. A brief walk through of our house was done to determine where, and how to film—then action! To put my son Pablo at ease the crew let him show off his electric train set. Next, it was back to the kitchen and the gluten-free M&M cookies. Pablo measured ingredients while I read off the recipe. Once finished my husband Dimitrios, the other celiac, moved into the kitchen to whip up some gluten-free pizza. The crew was drooling, honestly. It looked nice outside, so Meredith decided to ask Dimitrios a few questions. All done, we slip the crew some cookies for the road. They spent four hours at our home, and then went for a lunch break. It was then time for us to head to co-chair Allison Herwitts house for the next part of the taping.
    At 3:30 pm, the crew arrived at Allisons house in downtown Washington, D.C. and took some time to walk-through the house to determine its lighting. Tall ceilings, beautiful wall paintings, and a large antique chest mean extra setup time for the crew. "Can this door be moved, how about the chest?" The furniture is rearranged to fit the equipment. They promised to put everything back in place later.
    We sat briefly in the kitchen while the crew taped our strategy session. Next up was Allison and her husband Jim, who staged dinner preparations. While the grill heated up, Meredith had us sit for our interview. She was off-camera without a microphone. She asked us a question, and we were to repeat it as part of the answer. It seems simple enough, until you feel that you are asking her questions to make sure the answer is what we want on TV. In contrast to Shelley Case, who was required to answer "live" on camera, we had the opportunity to say, "I need to do that one again." An hour later, the asparagus and sausages were finished cooking, and dinner was served. The addition of wine and Chebe Bread made it a perfect gluten-free meal—and day.
    The Seven Day Roller Coaster Ride - by Shelley Case, Dietitian and Author
    I was thoroughly enjoying some rest and relaxation with my husband and two daughters at our cottage at the lake after a very hectic speaking schedule, and the completion of the third edition of my book and numerous family commitments. This peace and tranquility came to an immediate halt upon receiving a call Tuesday, August 12th at 10 AM from my publisher who said that a Meredith Klein from NBC in New York was trying to reach me. I returned her call and was informed that the NBC Today Show had filmed a segment with Dr. Fasano and representatives from the Celiac Task Force. NBC decided this five minute and 45 second taped segment needed to be followed by a live interview about the gluten-free diet, and were looking for someone with media experience who could discuss the diet in three minutes or less! She said Dr. Fasanos group recommended me and could I come to New York for the interview. After a pause of shock, I said yes. Silently thinking she would say this would take place in a few weeks or months, my mouth dropped when she said it was this Friday, August 15th. I told her I would need to discuss this with my husband, Blair. He was very supportive and said that I definitely needed to go to New York, and that we would somehow work out the logistics. I called Meredith back at noon and said yes. From then on life went into "warp speed"!
    Numerous calls and emails with Meredith about the interview and travel arrangements took place, as well as an emergency call to my hair stylist (every woman knows this is critical). Also, I felt Blair should join me on this exciting venture to New York City so we called Air Canada to see if he could get a flight using his air mile points on short notice. Amazingly he could but was only able to fly with me from Regina to Toronto and would have to go to Montreal and then to New York. I was to arrive in New York via Toronto at 2:30 PM and he would arrive at 4:30 PM. We decided to stay over Friday and Saturday at our expense to enjoy the sights of New York City and fly home Sunday evening. Again, he was not able to fly with me on the same flights, but at least we would be together in New York.
    Wednesday was a blur. More calls with Meredith, making childcare arrangements, washing clothes, packing, a haircut and so much more to do before we left on Thursday at 7:15 AM Andrea Levario called and told me that they had waited a long time for this story and were counting on me to do a good job. "No pressure here" I exclaimed. My husband had secretly called the local media about the NBC interview. The next thing I knew I was giving a radio and newspaper interview that afternoon about the trip and celiac disease. Word also got out on the internet, and I received many calls and emails from dietitians and the celiac community throughout North America wishing me good luck.
    Feeling tired and somewhat overwhelmed, I called some friends from our church asking them to pray for travel safety, peace of mind and clarity of thought during the interview, and that Blair and I would somehow be able to fly together all the way to New York and back.
    Rising early Thursday morning, we headed to the airport and were delighted to discover they found a seat for Blair on the flight from Toronto to New York! Feeling very grateful, we were on our way to the Big Apple. Upon arrival, I received two calls on my cell phone. One from Meredith making sure I arrived safely and with instructions to head to the NBC studio for the 4:30 PM dress rehearsal, and another from CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Company) requesting a radio interview on Friday after the Today Show.
    We arrived at our beautiful hotel on Central Park South, unpacked and were just about to leave the room when, shortly after 4:00 PM, the power went out. An announcement came on the emergency PA system that told us to remain calm and stay in our room. I told my husband that we should ignore the warning, walk down the 14 flights of stairs, and leave the hotel for NBC. Walking 10 blocks, through the packed streets of people streaming out of office and apartment buildings and traffic jams, we arrived at NBC where we met Meredith, the art directors and crewmembers. Light still came in through the windows of the studio, so we were able to organize all the foods into a display and discuss the format of the interview. Meredith told us to be back Friday morning at 8 a.m. for the 9:10 AM live interview with Katie Couric. They all thought that the power would be back on soon and told us not to worry.
    We headed back to the hotel, walked up the 14 flights of stairs to our room and changed into cooler clothing, as it was 95F and humid. Another miracle—our door locks had an emergency battery back up system and the card key locks worked, unlike many other hotels with only power key locks, which meant that guests in such hotels were unable to get into their rooms and had to sleep in the lobby—or in the street! As we only had a light salad lunch at noon, we went searching for food and drink, and soon discovered how big a challenge finding it would be. Other than a few bars selling their remaining cold beers, restaurants and shops were closed. We finally found a deli that was letting in a few people at a time to purchase items—cash only. Fortunately my wise husband carried cash in addition to plastic. Using flashlights and candles, we sought some safe foods—plain nuts, sunflower seeds, potato chips, dried cereal and bottled water. We crossed the street and sat on a rock in Central Park and enjoyed our "gourmet meal," and watched many bewildered people roaming the streets of New York. We tried phoning home to tell everyone we were fine but our cell phones did not work.
    At dusk we returned to the hotel and had to show our ID at the front door and again at the stairwell in order to get in. The hotels emergency preparation plan was in full swing and they issued each guest with a "glow stick" to get through the night. That little light was a precious gift in a very dark room with the pitch-black skyline out the window. The fear of not knowing what was going on around us, of whether or not we would soon have power, and whether I would be doing the biggest interview of my life the next morning created a lot of anxiety to say the least. My husband said we should plan for the best, set our travel alarm and go to sleep. He was soon in slumber land while I tossed and turned, mentally rehearsing the major points I needed to convey in less than three minutes! Still awake at 4:30 AM the lights and air conditioning suddenly came on. Totally exhausted from all the preparation over the last 3 days and no sleep Thursday night, I wondered how I could possibly think and speak clearly. Blair assured me that it would be fine and to get some sleep. Now was not the time to sleep! I jumped out of bed at 5:30 AM and into the shower and prepared to get myself together.
    We walked to NBC not knowing that Meredith had left a message on my cell phone (which was not working due to the blackout) saying there was a limo at the front door waiting for us. We arrived at the stage door and no one seemed to know what was happening with the guests. After some sweet-talking, the guard let us in and we saw the indoor studio was dark—not a good sign. We went outside and there was Katie and the rest of the Today Show hosts on the air and all they were covering was the blackout. I told Blair that I was glad that they decided not to do the celiac segment this morning because all the people on the east coast would not be able to watch it. After the show was done I had the opportunity to meet Katie and give her my gift from Canada. We got a picture together and she said she really hoped NBC would reschedule the interview because Meredith had worked so long and hard to produce the story.
    Returning to the hotel very disappointed and not knowing whether it would be rescheduled, we again went searching for food. After wandering around for 4 hours we finally found a restaurant that was open and seemed like a safe place to eat. The owner of the family restaurant of over 50 years told us she packed her freezer with ice and sealed the door before leaving the night before. We enjoyed our first real meal in NY other than the snack foods that we ate in Central Park the night before.
    During the day when cell phone coverage began working again, several radio stations and Canadian TV called wanting to know what was happening in New York. I did live interviews "on the street" giving first hand reports of the events, and also some information about celiac disease. I also received an anxious voice message from Pam King wondering if I made it to New York and what happened with the celiac segment.
    Later in the day we went back to the studio and found the art director who was able to check on his computer about Mondays show. Totally amazed, we learned NBC was rescheduling the celiac segment for Monday morning with Matt Lauer (All the other guests from Friday morning including the country band Brooks and Dunn were not rebooked). I immediately called Pam King with our good news. She was elated and relieved to know the celiac story was going ahead and posted the details to the Celiac List Serve. The next call was to Cynthia Kupper from GIG who posted the info on the Dietitian List Serve.
    Now that we knew it was a go for Monday morning, Blair and I finally had a chance to relax. Over the next 48 hours we managed to see four Broadway shows and enjoy the sights of New York.
    Meredith kept in contact with us over the weekend and told us a limo would be waiting again at the hotel to take us to the studio Monday morning! Sunday night we set our travel alarm, but also placed the official hotel wake up call, now that the phone was working. I did manage to sleep a few hours but still kept rehearsing in my mind the big interview. Upon arriving at the studio we were greeted by Meredith in the green room and went over the details of the interview. Then it was off to wardrobe where they pressed my jacket, then over to make-up where they touched up my lipstick and hair. Meredith and I went into the studio and reviewed the food layout. She also reminded me that Matt might not stick to the questions in the script. I had one minute to talk to Matt before we went to the taped segment, which I listened to very carefully, as I had not seen it before. After the segment Matt transitioned into the live interview and the first question he asked was not in the script! Fortunately I was able to answer that question, and then we moved on to the other questions that were in the script. Three minutes flew by and when it was over I felt the weight of the whole world off of my shoulders. Matt, Meredith and I had a short visit outside the studio and Blair took some pictures. Check out my website at www.glutenfreediet.ca and click on "in the media" to see the New York and NBC photos. I thanked Meredith for all her hard work on producing the celiac story, and for bringing me to New York, and I presented her with a gift from Saskatchewan.
    Blair and I returned to the hotel in our limo and then did some quick shopping for our kids. Our last meal was at a restaurant called "Shellys of New York," then it was back to the airport where we managed to get a flight with seats together—all the way home!
    As I reflect back on those seven days, it truly was an emotional and physical roller coaster ride that we will never forget. In spite of the ups and downs, we were truly blessed and we have so much to be thankful for—including the angels that watched over us!
    If you have not seem the Today Show segment on celiac disease, please visit our website at www.celiaccenter.org and enjoy.
    Shelley Case, B.Sc., RD, is a consulting dietitian, member of the Medical Advisory Boards of the Celiac Disease Foundation, Gluten Intolerance Group and Canadian Celiac Association and co-author of the celiac section in the Manual of Clinical Dietetics by the American Dietetic Association and Dietitians of Canada. She is also the author of the best selling book Gluten-Free Diet: A Comprehensive Resource Guide.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/07/2011 - With diagnosis for celiac disease and gluten intolerance growing by leaps and bounds, it's no wonder that the list of celebrities who eat gluten-free continues to grow as well.
    Like anyone else with celiac disease and gluten-intolerance, for celebrities and athletes who suffer from either condition, consuming gluten damages the lining of the small intestine and reduces absorption of important nutrients.
    People with celiac disease are more likely to have autoimmune disorders, Addison’s disease, Down syndrome, intestinal cancer, intestinal lymphoma, lactose intolerance, thyroid disease, and type-1 diabetes. In the United States, approximately 1 out of 133 people are diagnosed with celiac disease.
    A partial list of some noteworthy celebrities and athletes who reportedly follow a gluten-free diet due to celiac disease, gluten-intolerance, or other reasons include: news host Keith Olbermann, actor Billy Bob Thornton,  Elizabeth Hasselback Katherine, Dutchess of Kent, news anchor Heidi Collins, actresses Gwyneth Paltrow, Jennifer Esposito, Goldie Hahn, Rachel Weisz, Zooey Deschanel, Susie Essman, Emmy Rossum, and Heidi Collins.
    Chelsea Clinton featured a noteworthy gluten-free offering at her wedding reception.
    Athletes include tennis stars Novic Djokovic, who attributes an unbeaten string of wins in part to a switch to a gluten-free diet.
    German tennis star Sabine Lisicki looks to bounce back after collapsing on the verge of a major upset at the French Open; a collapse she attributes to an undiagnosed gluten-sensitivity.



    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/05/2013 - One in three adults want to avoid or cut down on gluten in their diets, says a survey from the consumer research firm, NPD Group. NDP began asking consumers about gluten-free issues in 2009, and the responses for their January 2013 survey show the highest level of interest in gluten-free diets so far.
    NDP's chief industry analyst, Harry Balzer, said in a recent press release that avoiding gluten is the "health issue of the day," and compared the current efforts to avoid or reduce dietary gluten to efforts a generation ago to avoid fat, cholesterol, sugar and sodium.
    Specifically, Balzer said: a "generation ago, health was about avoiding fat, cholesterol, sugar and sodium in our diet. While those desires still exist for many, they no longer are growing concerns…Today, increasingly more of us want to avoid gluten in our diet and right now it is nearly 30 percent of the adult population...and it’s growing."
    Gluten-free foods are now a $4.2 billion a year industry, and interest has extended to the restaurant industry as well.
    NPD found that 200 million restaurant visits in the past year included a gluten-free order. “The number of U.S. adults who say they are cutting down on or avoiding gluten is too large for restaurant operators to ignore,” said Bonnie Riggs, a restaurant industry analyst for NDP, in the same release.
    Currently, some three million Americans have been diagnosed with celiac disease, which is now is four times more common than it was 50 years ago.
    While the rise in diagnosis and awareness of gluten-intolerance and celiac disease continues to fuel popularity of gluten-free diets, the supposed health benefits of eliminating gluten are also a factor.
    It is certainly true that some of this gluten-free diet trend has been triggered by pop culture and media celebrities, many of whom are not eating gluten-free out of medical necessity.
    Still, it's likely that the gluten-free trend will continue into the foreseeable future, at least. 
    Source:
    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2013/03/06/gluten-free-diet_n_2818954.html


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