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  • Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    • Rice and soy beverages because their production process may utilize barley enzymes.
    • Bad advice from health food store employees (i.e., that spelt and/or kamut is/are safe for celiacs).
    • Cross-contamination between food store bins selling raw flours and grains (usually via the scoops).
    • Wheat-bread crumbs in butter, jams, toaster, counter, etc.
    • Lotions, creams and cosmetics (primarily for those with dermatitis herpetaformis).
    • Toothpaste and mouthwash.
    • Medicines: many contain gluten.
    • Cereals: most contain malt flavoring, or some other non-gluten-free ingredient.
    • Some brands of rice paper.
    • Sauce mixes and sauces (soy sauce, fish sauce, catsup, mustard, mayonnaise, etc.).
    • Ice cream.
    • Packet & canned soups.
    • Dried meals and gravy mixes.
    • Laxatives.
    • Grilled restaurant food - gluten contaminated grill.
    • Fried restaurant foods - gluten contaminated grease.
    • Ground spices - wheat flour is sometimes used to prevent clumping.

    Edited by Scott Adams


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    Where have you been for the past 2 years? I've been trying things hit or miss weekly. I've found if I make it it's gluten free. I'm still looking for a list of chain restaurants that have gluten-free menus.

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    Interesting....

     

    I don't have celiac (tested by endoscopy), but I certainly have IBS and a certain amount of GI gluten intolerance, so I am keeping my gluten intake very low.

     

    BTW: San J Brand Tamari soy sauce is gluten-free and I think it's the most delicious available - better than the kinds including wheat.

     

    Mel

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    To Debbie M, a friend tipped me off to good restaurants that have gluten-free menus or are open to customize meals for various health needs, she suggested vegan restaurants. I have also found Thai and Vietnamese restaurants are good. I also have to stay away from dairy and MSG, so finding restaurants has been challenging and my work keeps me on the road a lot. Hope this helps.

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    My Naturepath suggested I read Living Gluten-Free for Dummies, it is an excellent book and led me to your website. This is my first time viewing the blog and reading your information. Thank you for having this website, some very good info here. Just a note for those who have been tested for celiac by endoscopy you may want to read chapter 2 of Living Gluten-free for Dummies.

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    ugh! I love mayonnaise.... drat!

    I love mayo too and Cain's Mayonnaise (found in the New England states is gluten free) I live in Georgia and have someone I know up there send me 2-3 large jars in the cooler weather to get me thru.

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    Please be careful of liquors, also! Not because of the distillation process (which does eliminate the gluten), but from the caramel color, which is added to maintain a consistent color between batches in mass-produced liquors. I only discovered this after consistently getting sick from tequila and sherry in my own cooking. After contacting the manufacturers, I discovered the caramel color problem... I now avoid any liquor with a brown or yellow color, unless I have contacted the manufacturer and found out it is safe.

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    This thing just gets more daunting.

     

    I thought I was on top of things, I no longer get GI distress (which was my normal for about a decade). I no longer fall off the wagon with "eh, it's worth a belly ache," followed by, "well, the damage is done, since I'm headed to bathroom all night, I may as well enjoy a piece of cake."

     

    So I've been super good, I don't even have the cravings I used to have. I go to the doctor because I'm exhausted, achy, have muscle twitches and cramps... and it turns out a lot of important electrolytes are low (sodium, potassium, magnesium, and a few other are borderline low). So for lack of any other explanation, I'm thinking I must be eating these hidden glutens.

     

    So, am I going to have to quarantine a cupboard in my house and never eat at a restaurant?

     

    I don't even know if this is a question or a rant.

     

    Does anyone else here ever feel like their diet is an inconvenience for their whole family?

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    I have celiac disease and I am constantly worrying about different products, this is very helpful. I read labels and sometimes find it confusing. I have been on a gluten free diet since 2003. My celiac disease is called 'refractory,' but I manage. This site is very helpful...thanks.

    What do you different from other people with celiac disease since you have refractory celiac?

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  • About Me

    Celiac.com's Founder and CEO, Scott was diagnosed with celiac disease  in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. Scott launched the site that later became Celiac.com in 1995 "To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives."  In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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