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    Scott Adams
    Scott Adams

    Adult Celiac Patients Do Tolerate Large Amounts of Oats

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition (2003) 57, 163-169. doi:10.1038/sj.ejcn.1601525

    S Størsrud1,a,b, M Olsson2,b, R Arvidsson Lenner1,b, L Å Nilsson3,b, O Nilsson4,b and A Kilander2,b
    1) Department of Clinical Nutrition, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
    2) Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
    3) Department of Medical Microbiology and Immunology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden
    4) Department of Pathology, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden



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    Abstract:

    Celiac.com 3/14/2003 - Objective: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether adult patients with coeliac disease in remission could include large amounts of oats in their daily gluten-free diet for an extended period of time without adverse effects.

    Design, subjects and methods: Twenty adult coeliac patients in remission included large amounts of uncontaminated rolled oats in their daily diet for a prolonged period. The examinations, performed four times during the study period, included small bowel endoscopy with biopsies, blood samples (nutritional status, serological analysis), height and body weight, gastrointestinal symptoms and dietary records. Gastrointestinal symptoms and diet were also investigated through unannounced telephone interviews once a month during the study period.

    Results: No adverse effects of a large intake of oats were seen in small bowel histology, serology nor in nutritional status in the 15 subjects who completed the whole study period. Two of the subjects dropped out because of gastrointestinal symptoms and three for non-medical reasons. The median intake of oats was 93 g/day and the compliance to the oat diet was found to be good. Examinations of the patients after drop-out did not show any deterioration in small bowel histology or nutritional status nor raised levels of antibodies.

    Conclusion: Results from this study indicate that adult patients with coeliac disease in remission can include large amounts of controlled wheat-free rolled oats for an extended period of time without adverse effects.

    Sponsorship: This study was supported by Vårdalstiftelsen, Kommunalförbundet Västra Götaland, Stiftelsen Cerealia FoU, and the Swedish Nutrition Foundation. Kungsörnen AB supported the study with rolled oats.



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  • About Me

    Scott Adams

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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    Scott Adams
    From an oral report by Dr. Murray; transcribed for the list by Ann Whelan, editor of the bi-monthly newsletter Gluten-Free Living. To subscribe, write to P.O. Box 105, Hastings-on-Hudson, NY 10706. Dr. Joseph Murray, one of the leading USA physicians in the diagnosis of celiac disease (celiac disease) and dermatitis herpetiformis (DH). Dr. Murray (murray.joseph@mayo.edu) of the Mayo Clinic Rochester, MN, is a gastroenterologist who specializes in treating Celiac disease:
    THE DAILY REPORT: The big story today from Finland is oats. There were two talks and several posters presented about the topic.
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    There was a second study presented from Dublin, and reported by Dr. Conleth Feighery. This 12-week study looked at a small group of patients with healed celiac disease to start with, who were given 50 grams of oats a day. Again, the oats were carefully screened and tested to make sure there was no contamination.
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    This sounded odd, so I made sure Id really understood what Joe reported and paraphrased: In other words, theyre seeing no reaction from oats within the body in some studies but this one showed a reaction outside the body? Yes, Joe said, this of course is puzzling. Continuing on the oats issue, a series of short studies from several places also showed what the Finns had shown in the body, i.e., no problem in the short term.
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    Scott Adams
    J Pediatr 2000;137:356-366
    Celiac.com 10/10/2000 - Dr. Hoffenberg and colleagues from the University of Colorado School of Medicine, Denver report that the short-term consumption of commercially available oat cereal is safe for children with celiac disease new to a gluten-free diet. To determine this they studied 10 children with celiac disease who consumed 24 g of oat cereal per day, and examined small bowel histomorphology and antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer at baseline and at 6 months. According to Dr. Hoffenberg: Compared with start of study, at completion there was a significant decrease in biopsy score, intraepithelial count, antitissue transglutaminase IgA antibody titer and number of symptoms.
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    Quaker oatmeal 0.006 %
    Safeway oatmeal 0.005 %
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    Pancake mix 0.000 %
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    Rice flour 0.000 %
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    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 3/14/2003 - After conducting an extensive review of the medical literature concerning the safety of oats for people with celiac disease, the American Dietetic Association recently concluded that even though oats are not yet endorsed as safe for people with celiac disease by doctors and support groups in the USA, they should, however, be safe for celiacs who choose to consume them if they limit their consumption to amounts found to be safe in several studies (approximately one-half cup of dry whole-grain rolled oats per day). Ideally, they also should be advised to consume only those products tested and found to be free of contamination. If this is not possible, patients should be counseled on steps they can take to help reduce their chances of consuming contaminated oat products (e.g., avoiding oats sold in bulk from bins, determining from manufacturers whether a dedicated line or facility is used for processing). In addition, patients should be advised to discuss any dietary changes with their physicians.
    The American Dietetic Associations conditional acceptance of oats as safe for people with celiac disease is another big step forward for celiacs in the USA.
    For more information see:
    Oats and the gluten-free diet
    Journal of the American Dietetic Association
    March 2003 - Volume 103 - Number 3



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