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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Adverse Gluten Reactions Impact Oral Mucosa in Celiac Patients

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 07/31/2014 - Although the adverse mucosal reaction in celiac disease occurs mainly in the small intestine, other mucosal surfaces in the gastrointestinal tract and the gut-associated lymphoid tissue are also affected. To better understand the impact, a research team recently set out to examine histopathological findings in the oral mucosa of celiac disease patients.

    Photo: Tasmanian Devil--Wikimedia Commons--Wayne McLeanSpecifically, based on the assumption that the oral mucosa could reflect the histopathological intestinal inflammation seen in celiac disease patients, they wanted to determine the pattern of T-cell subsets in the oral mucosa of young adults with celiac disease. The research team included E. Bardellini, F. Amadori, A. Ravelli, M. Salemme, S. Lonardi, V. Villanacci, and A. Majorana.


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    For their study, they enrolled a group of 37 patients with celiac disease, ranging in age from 20-38 years. Twenty-eight were female, nine male. The team broke the 37 subjects into two groups. The nineteen patients of group A were following a gluten free diet (GFD); two patients for less than one year; 6 patients between 1 and 5 years; 11 patients more than 5 years. The 18 patients (group B) remained untreated.

    Meanwhile, fifteen healthy volunteers (age range 18-35 years, 11 females and 4 males served as controls. Because the study involved observing untreated celiac patients, the team sought and received ethical approval for the research from the Ethics Committee.

    The team took biopsy specimens from normal looking oral mucosa. They conducted immunohistochemical investigation with monoclonal antibodies to CD3, CD4, CD8, and gamma/delta-chains T cell receptor (TCR).

    They found T-lymphocytic inflammatory infiltrate significantly higher in group B (p < 0.0001); as compared with group A and with the control group.

    Their results confirm that the oral cavity is involved with adverse reactions to celiac disease triggers, and might offer potential for celiac diagnosis.

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    I have been on a gluten-free diet for 12 years and can tell when I have been glutened by the outbreak of canker sores the next day.

     

    It seems if a correlation could be made between oral mucosa and the small intestine biopsies, that an oral swab test could be enough for a celiac disease diagnosis

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    This is great to know, but I have a question. Maybe you can help me or tell me who I can talk to. I have celiac disease and I eat gluten-free but I still get sores in my mouth, WHY?

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    The article did not define and explain oral mucosa nor its symptoms.

    Are you serious? Oral mucosa is simply the lining of the mouth. Please look things up before commenting.

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    This is great to know, but I have a question. Maybe you can help me or tell me who I can talk to. I have celiac disease and I eat gluten-free but I still get sores in my mouth, WHY?

    First, I'm not a doctor, so definitely consult one. However, two possibilities are: 1) You may have sensitivities to things besides wheat gluten. 2) You may be getting cross-contamination.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, science, and advanced research, and scientific methods. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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