Jump to content
  • Sign Up
  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Allergen-free, Gluten-Free Snacks are Still a Goldmine

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Though they may morph into many hybrid forms of cross-category products, such as "Gluten-Free Paleo," gluten-free foods and snacks will likely continue their popularity into the foreseeable future.


    Caption: Image: CC BY-SA 2.0--gfdnova1

    Celiac.com 11/19/2019 - Driven in part by perceptions of better health and nutrition, sales of gluten-free snacks remains strong, though the paleo category is rising fast. That's leading to some evolution, and even some overlap, within these categories. 

    According to a SPINS 2019 “State of the Industry” report, paleo and grain-free food and beverages are showing the fastest growth in conventional retail. The paleo diet has nothing to do with food intolerance, but instead touts the perceived healthiness of certain "paleo" foods. 

    Paleo-positioned foods grew 48.8% to $294 million in conventional retail sales compared to the previous year, while the grain-free category grew 81.5% to $139.4 million over the previous year. 

    The biggest growth was seen in the chip, pretzel, and snack categories, which saw paleo products grow 163.5% to $41.1 million in sales and grain-free snack sales grow 258.3% to $29.7 million.

    Consumers who do not suffer from celiac disease, which affects only about 1 in 100 people, are driving the growth of gluten-free and paleo foods, in part because of the belief that such foods are healthier and more nutritious than their gluten-containing counterparts.

    By all projections, though they may morph into many hybrid forms of cross-category products, such as "Gluten-Free Paleo," gluten-free foods and snacks will likely continue their popularity into the foreseeable future.

    Read more at nutritionaloutlook.com.


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Guest Outlier Babe

    Posted

    What about celiacs diagnosed so late our leaky guts prohibit almost everything?  PLEASE stop adding flax and chia to everything!!  Some of us can have rice, buckwheat, gluten-free oats, and... That's it.

    And please will SOMEone cater to the corn-allergic celiacs out here?  99% of the gluten-free products on the market are corn-taminated with cornstarch, maltodextrin, citric acid (grown with mold on corn), or xantham gum ("Xanthan gum  is derived from sugar... [that] can come from...wheat, corn, soy, and dairy.  People with severe allergies...may need to avoid...xanthan gum unless they can determine what source the xanthan gum came from.")

    (https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/xanthan-gum#section6 )

    Even if one isn't corn-allergic, corn is a resource-intensive, land-abusive, and heavily-subsidized crop. To use it for anything other than direct human consumption may now be environmentally and economically suspect.

     

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    6 hours ago, Guest Outlier Babe said:

    What about celiacs diagnosed so late our leaky guts prohibit almost everything?  PLEASE stop adding flax and chia to everything!!  Some of us can have rice, buckwheat, gluten-free oats, and... That's it.

    And please will SOMEone cater to the corn-allergic celiacs out here?  99% of the gluten-free products on the market are corn-taminated with cornstarch, maltodextrin, citric acid (grown with mold on corn), or xantham gum ("Xanthan gum  is derived from sugar... [that] can come from...wheat, corn, soy, and dairy.  People with severe allergies...may need to avoid...xanthan gum unless they can determine what source the xanthan gum came from.")

    (https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/xanthan-gum#section6 )

    Even if one isn't corn-allergic, corn is a resource-intensive, land-abusive, and heavily-subsidized crop. To use it for anything other than direct human consumption may now be environmentally and economically suspect.

     

    -_- Yeah my corn allergy is annoying, luckily I find some products are processed to remove the proteins (Erythritol) and stuff is hit and miss. Citric acid and Xantham gum from Beets by example does not make me sick, but you honestly have to research, call, email like crazy to find this stuff out. Maltodextrin is annoying, as I they sometimes remove the proteins sometimes not.....and I fail to understand why the potato, rice, or even the tapioca ones are not used more often being more hypoallergenic.

    Personally I have no issues with flax/chia thank god, but I have corn and whey allergies and a whole list of intolerance issues and circumstances to how foods need to be cooked or prepped to ease digestion. Heck I even react mildly to any kind of oats (10% of celiacs do)

    You might try Mikey's for pizza and English muffins (their breads have flax but the rest is safe), and Julian Bakery For Breads. I personally like Califlour Foods for pizza but they use other seeds you mentioned.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

×
×
  • Create New...