Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    AN-PEP Shows Promise in Breaking Down Gluten in Stomach

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.   eNewsletter: Get our eNewsletter

      Can an enzyme help celiac patients reduce or eliminate symptoms from accidental gluten ingestion?


    Caption: Photo: CC--Pascal

    Celiac.com 06/26/2017 - Designed to reduce or eliminate symptoms of gluten contamination in gluten-sensitive individuals, the product known as AN-PEP, marketed in the U.S. as Tolerase G, is a prolyl endoprotease enzyme, derived from Aspergillus niger, that has shown promise in breaking down gluten proteins.

    The latest news comes in the form of a small study that shows the enzyme to be effective in the stomach itself, where harshly acidic conditions render many enzymes ineffective.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    Speaking to an audience at Digestive Disease Week (DDW) 2017, lead investigator Julia König, PhD, of Sweden's Örebro University, said that the enzyme was special, because…[t]here are a lot of enzymes on the market, but this functions in the stomach where the pH is acidic. Often enzymes don't work in this environment."

    König was also quick to caution that "you cannot use this enzyme to treat or prevent celiac disease." The enzyme is not intended to replace a gluten-free diet for celiac patients.

    The enzyme is designed to provide some protection against cross-contamination for people with gluten-sensitivity by breaking down modest amounts of gluten to reduce or prevent adverse immune reaction.

    A previous study showed that AN-PEP breaks down gluten after an intra-gastrically infused liquid meal in healthy volunteers (Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2015;42:273-285).

    In the latest randomized placebo-controlled crossover study, Dr König and her colleagues assessed the ability of AN-PEP to degrade gluten after a normal meal in people with gluten sensitivity.

    The research team looked at 18 people with self-reported gluten sensitivity, and with no confirmation of celiac disease. On three separate visits, investigators collected gastric and duodenal aspirates with a multilumen nasoduodenal-feeding catheter.

    Participants then consumed a porridge containing gluten, approximately 0.5 g, in the form of two crumbled wheat cookies. They also consumed a tablet containing AN-PEP at either 160,000 PPi or 80,000 PPi), or placebo. Investigators collected stomach and duodenal aspirates over the following 3 hours.

    In both the high- and low-dose AN-PEP groups, gluten concentrations in the stomach and in the duodenum were substantially lower than in the placebo group.

    This study shows that AN-PEP does break down gluten in the stomach, where many enzymes fail. If successfully tested and commercially released, AN-PEP could help people with gluten sensitivity, including those with celiac disease, to reduce or eliminate symptoms associated with casual gluten contamination.

     Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    The key words; "You cannot use this enzyme to treat or prevent celiac disease" supports the old adage that "An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure". Wheat is now known as the "silent killer". According to Dr. W. Davis wheat contains: Gliadin protein triggers intestinal permeability; Amylopectin A responsible for elevated blood sugars; Agglutinin which blocks holecystokinin or CCK, that can lead to bile stasis. It is no surprise that diabetes, celiac, gluten sensitive enteritis & herpetiformis dermatitis are on the rise. The end result of gluten associated disease "fear" is that 1/3 of American adults are trying to eliminate it from their diets. World stockpiles of corn and wheat are at record highs. The grain-stuffed silo bags are reportedly taller than a man, often longer than a soccer field. Additionally, the incidence of celiac disease has increased more than fourfold in the past sixty years. What happened over those past 60 years? How is it that an individual who consumed wheat, barley and rye since the 1950´s suddenly developed celiac disease along with thousands of other people in 2009? What were the circumstances that occurred that brought about this new "magic wheat"?

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 10/21/2016 - Researchers at Boston University's Henry M. Golden School of Dental Medicine have identified a metabolic enzyme that alerts the body to invading bacteria, which may lead to new treatments for celiac disease.
    A research team that set out to isolate and identify the enzymes and evaluate their potential as novel enzyme therapeutics for celiac disease, reports...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/26/2016 - Could gluten-degrading enzymes offer a better future for celiac patients? Rothia mucilaginosa is an oral microbial colonizer that can break down proline- and glutamine-rich proteins present in wheat, barley, and rye that contain the immunogenic sequences that drive celiac disease. A team of researchers recently set out to isolate and identify the enzymes...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/27/2017 - A number of researchers are looking to provide alternative or adjunct treatments to the gluten-free diet in celiac disease. Meanwhile, a number of companies are currently developing a wide variety of such options, ranging from various kinds of enzyme therapies, to treatments that eliminate celiac disease reactions, even to vaccines to inoculate celiac sufferers...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/29/2017 - Currently, a gluten-free diet is the only way to manage celiac disease. Can a celiac vaccine change that? One company thinks so. ImmusanT corporation has developed a therapeutic vaccine, Nexvax2, that is specifically designed to treat celiac disease. The vaccine is an adjuvant-free mix of three peptides that include immunodominant epitopes for gluten-specific...

  • Forum Discussions

    Yup, and I expect most of those reactions happen because the makeup/lip balm..ect ends up in their mouth in inadvertently and then into the GI tract. 
    Celiac disease is very clearly defined and is triggered by the gliadin molecule leaking into the lining of the small intestine. It then causes an inflammatory reaction that then causes a multitude of secondary issues. That said, many...
    It's good to hear things are more or less under control now. Sounds like quite a medical ordeal you have been through and a long winding rode. Thanks for sharing. So many more medical problems are autoimmune based than most people realize...