Jump to content



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    An Update of Every Major Celiac Disease Drug, Enzyme, or Treatment in Development

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    In the last several years, new treatment approaches for celiac disease have emerged; several drugs have made it to Phase 2 trials, and results for a number of drugs look promising. These new celiac disease treatments include a potential vaccine.

    An Update of Every Major Celiac Disease Drug, Enzyme, or Treatment in Development - Assorted medications. Image: CC--NIAID
    Caption: Assorted medications. Image: CC--NIAID

    Celiac.com 01/14/2019 - There are a number of new drugs in development that are designed to treat celiac disease. In addition to a possible vaccine, those drugs include enzymes and other drugs that are designed to reduce or eliminate the body’s adverse reaction to gluten through various mechanisms.

    Here's a 2019 status update for every drug for treating celiac disease currently in development:



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    ALV003—Created by Alvine Pharmaceuticals, is a combination of two enzymes that break down gluten before it can provoke an immune reaction. The drug is a powder to be dissolved in water and taken before meals. ALV003 passed a phase 2 clinical trial, and results were published in the June 2014 issue of Gastroenterology. Post-trial biopsies showed that ALV003 prevented intestinal damage in 34 volunteers with celiac disease, each of whom ate 2 grams of gluten per day for six weeks, in addition to taking ALV-003. Phase 2b, a 12-week trial, is now underway.
     
    AN-PEP (aspergillus niger prolyl endopeptidase)—Created by DSM Food Specialties, AN-PEP is another enzyme that degrades gluten. AN-PEP is believed to work best when taken while gluten is still in the stomach. A 2013 study showed AN-PEP to be safe, but failed to show that the enzyme had any effect, so further study is under way. That study appeared in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. In a 2018 study, AN-PEP extensively degraded gluten concentrations of up to 80,000 mg/kg in rye flour, rye sourdough, and sourdough starter under specific temperatures and pH values, while leaving the microorganisms in the sourdough starter fully intact.  

    ActoBiotics—Created by ActoGenX uses Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc. Early pre-clinical work with a genetically altered L. lactis secreting a peptide derived from gliadin demonstrated an in vivo suppression of gluten sensitization. Specifically, Huigbregtse et al. engineered L. lactis to secrete a deamidated DQ8 gliadin epitope (LL-eDQ8d) and studied the induction of Ag-specific tolerance in NOD ABo DQ8 transgenic mice [34]. Although apparently not part of the ActoGenX development program, recent work by Galipeau et al. also deserves mention in this context. The group treated gluten-sensitive mice with elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, delivered by the L. lactis vector, and found normalization of inflammation, improved permeability, and maintained ZO-1 expression. There is speculation that this is due to reduced deamidation of gliadin peptide.
     
    AVX176—Created by Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug patented to provide "Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance." The patent, which expires on May 27 2029. AVX176 provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia's proprietary platform technology.
     
    BL-7010—by BioLineRx, is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. This drug has been shown in mice to reduce the immune system response that leads to intestinal damage and villous atrophy in celiac disease. BL-7010 actually binds to the gluten protein, reducing the protein's toxicity.The drug, with the gluten molecule attached, then passes harmlessly through the digestive system to be expelled as stool. BL-7010 has undergone safety testing in humans and was found to be well tolerated. According to BioLineRx, testing will begin in mid-2015 to see if the drug works as expected to diminish gluten's effects on the body. However, BL-7010 is designed to protect only against gluten cross-contamination; it won't allow people with celiac disease to eat large amounts of gluten.
     
    CCR9—by Chemocentryx, is a drug called vercirnon, which is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. CCR9 has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. However, despite the completion of the trial several years ago, no results relating to celiac disease have been made public or published.
     
    Egg Yolk Enzyme—Little is known about efforts to develop a celiac treatment that uses egg yolk to coat gluten and allow it to pass through the body undetected, thus preventing an adverse gluten reaction in sensitive individuals. Like most other drugs being developed, this treatment would work to prevent reactions to small amounts of gluten, rather than as a cure for celiac disease. Recent news shows that the egg yolk enzyme is safe for humans.

    GliadinX (Aspergillus niger)—GliadinX is a dietary supplement with the highest concentration of AN-PEP, Prolyl Endopeptidase (Aspergillus Niger), the most effective enzyme proven to break down gluten in the stomach. This high potency enzyme formulation is specifically designed to break down gliadin. GliadinX does not prevent or cure celiac disease. However, clinical research has shown that it effectively breaks down gliadin into small, harmless fragments before it can reach the small intestine.
     
    INN-202 (Larazotide Acetate)—Created by Alba Therapeutics and later acquired by Innovate Pharmaceutical, and renamed INN-202, larazotide acetate works by blocking a protein that carries pieces of gluten across the gut. Results of a phase 2 trial of larazotide acetate appear in the February 2015 edition of Gastroenterology. While INN-202 may greatly reduce the symptoms of gluten exposure in celiacs, it is unlikely that a permit consumption of unlimited amounts of gluten. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has fast-tracked the drug. Phase III clinical trials are currently underway. Results of the trial should be available soon.

    Nexvax2—Created by ImmusanT, Nexvax2 is touted as a vaccine, but works much like an allergy shot. Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Similar to allergy shots, the vaccine is designed to reprogram gluten-specific T cells triggered by the patient's immune response to the protein. Nexvax2 exposes the immune system to gluten in a controlled way so that immune cells that are usually activated get turned off or eliminated. So far, Nexvax2 has completed a phase 1 trial showing it to be safe, and the company has begun Phase II trials on humans in Australia and New Zealand.

    Saliva Rothia—Researchers at the Henry M. Golden School of Dental Medicine were looking at how proteins in general break down in saliva when they discovered an enzyme in a bacterium called Rothia that pulverized gluten as if it were Pac Man. That happy accident has led to a new stream of study that has moved beyond petri dishes to study the effect of the so-called ‘subtilisin,’ or protein-ingesting enzyme on the tiny digestive systems of mice. In so doing, they have found another bacterium, B. subtilis, which produces an enzyme similar to the Rothia one and is already safely consumed in Japan in a fermented soybean dish called ‘natto.’

    A 2018 Boston University report concludes that “oral Rothia bacteria to gliadin digestion and pharmaceutical modification can protect Sub-A from auto-digestion as well as from acidic insults, thus rendering the usefulness of coated subtilisins as a digestive aid for gluten degradation.”
     
    ZED1227—Created by Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase II clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. ZED1227 molecules work by targeting the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to suppress the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process.

    Sources:


    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Let me get this straight.

    First: Scientist create toxic mutated wheat.

    Second: 1 in 133 persons world-wide develop diseases associated with the toxic mutated wheat.

    Third: Scientists create expensive pharmaceuticals to treat the associated disease(s) from the toxic mutated wheat that scientist first created.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/10/2015 - Of course, a strict gluten free diet is still the only safe and effective treatment for celiac disease. However, new drugs in development, some of which are currently being tested on humans, might allow people with celiac disease to safely eat gluten again, at least in small amounts.
    To be fair, even if all goes smoothly, it will be a few years at least before we see such treatments on the market. Moreover, even though many early results have been encouraging, none have yet entered safety trials, the final step before Food and Drug Administration approval and commercial availability.
    Drugs currently under trial include an enzyme that splits the protein in wheat that triggers adverse reactions, into smaller harmless products, and another which promises to make the gut less leaky, and thus block potentially toxic substances from triggering inflammation.
    There are several other drugs in earlier stages of development aimed at suppressing the immune response to gluten and preventing intestinal inflammation:
    ALV003, which will protect people with celiac disease against gut damage from small amounts of gluten. BL-7010 is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten. ImmusanT’s therapeutic vaccine Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Larazotide acetate (AT-1001) is Alba Therapeutics Corporation’s investigational product, a first-in-class tight junction regulator, intended for the treatment of patients with celiac disease. AVX176, from Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug that is the subject of U.S. composition of matter patent 8,071,101, “Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance.” The patent, which expires on May 27 2029, provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia’s proprietary platform technology [32]. ActoGenX is carrying out discovery research in celiac disease with its range of ActoBiotics™, which use Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc. Chemocentryx’s CCR9, is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn’s disease. It has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. Meanwhile, in Europe, Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase I clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. The small molecule targets the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to dampen the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process.
    Some of these drugs may be taken right before eating gluten, while others might be more effective when taken on a regular schedule. If approved for use as intended, these drugs will likely allow people with celiac disease to eat gluten in small amounts. To my knowledge, there is no drug in current trial phases that is designed to permit unrestricted gluten consumption.
    So, the good news is that the next few years may see commercially available treatments that might actual help people manage celiac disease. The downside for people with celiac disease, at least for now, is that there is no treatment on the horizon that will allow safe, unlimited gluten-consumption. Moreover, there is no hint that a cure is coming anytime soon.
    Still, it’s good to know that researchers are working on providing helpful tools for treating celiac disease.
    Are you looking forward to seeing new treatment options for celiac disease? What kind of benefits should such treatments offer?
    Source:
    Gastroenterology Report


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/18/2015 - Research is underway on a number of new drugs intended to celiac disease treatment beyond a simple gluten-free diet. However, even though several drugs are in Phase 2 trials and results appear promising, discussion around regulatory endpoints is just beginning.
    A research team recently reviewed endpoints for Phase 2 and 3 trials of new celiac disease drugs currently under development, and detailed their results in a scientific paper. The team included Klaus Gottlieb, Jill Dawson, Fez Hussain and Joseph A. Murray. They are variously affiliated with the department of Immunology and Internal Medicine of Medical Strategy & Science, Quintiles, Durham, NC, USA, with Corporate Communications, Quintiles, Durham, NC, USA, and with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, USA.
    In the paper, the team discusses celiac drugs currently under development, along with trial endpoints, such as patient-reported outcomes, histology, serology, gene expression analysis and other tests.
    They outline the differing requirements for proof-of-concept Phase 2 trials and Phase 3 registration trials, with a particular emphasis on current thinking in regulatory agencies. They conclude their paper with recommendations and a glossary of regulatory terms, to enable readers who are less familiar with regulatory language to take maximum advantage of this review.
    Stay tuned for more news and information on all developments concerning trials of new celiac drug treatments.
    Source:
    Gastroenterology Report, Oxford Journals. 10.1093/gastro/gov006


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/21/2015 - Here's every celiac disease treatment currently in development in a single list:
    ALV003, by Alvine Pharmaceuticals, is a combination of two enzymes that break down gluten before it can provoke an immune reaction. The drug is a powder to be dissolved in water and taken before meals.

    ALV003 most recently passed a phase 2 clinical trial, results of which appeared in the June 2014 issue of Gastroenterology. Post-trial biopsies showed that ALV003 prevented intestinal damage in 34 volunteers with celiac disease who ate 2 grams of gluten each day for six weeks and also took the drug. Phase 2b, a 12-week trial, is now underway.
      AN-PEP, by DSM Food Specialties, is another enzyme that degrades gluten. AN-PEP is believed to work best when taken while gluten is still in the stomach.

    Results from a small 2013 study showing AN-PEP to be safe, appeared in the World Journal of Gastroenterology. For the study, 16 people ate 7 grams of gluten every day for two weeks and half of them also ate AN-PEP, and half took a placebo. However, the placebo group did not get sick enough during the course of the study to show that the enzyme had any effect, so further study is under way.
      ActoBiotics by ActoGenX uses Lactococcus lactis as an expression system to locally secrete bio-therapeutics such as cytokines, antibodies, hormones, etc.

    Early pre-clinical work with a genetically altered L. lactis secreting a peptide derived from gliadin demonstrated an in vivo suppression of gluten sensitization.

    Specifically, Huigbregtse et al. engineered L. lactis to secrete a deamidated DQ8 gliadin epitope (LL-eDQ8d) and studied the induction of Ag-specific tolerance in NOD ABo DQ8 transgenic mice [34]. Although apparently not part of the ActoGenX development program, recent work by Galipeau et al. also deserves mention in this context.

    The group treated gluten-sensitive mice with elafin, a serine protease inhibitor, delivered by the L. lactis vector, and found normalization of inflammation, improved permeability, and maintained ZO-1 expression. There is speculation that this is due to reduced deamidation of gliadin peptide.
      AVX176 by Avaxia Biologics, is an investigational oral antibody drug patented to provide "Antibody Therapy for Treatment of Diseases Associated with Gluten Intolerance." The patent, which expires on May 27 2029, provides broad coverage for treating celiac disease using orally administered antibodies produced by Avaxia's proprietary platform technology.
      BL-7010, by BioLineRx, is a novel co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, which significantly reduces the immune response triggered by gluten.

    This drug has been shown in mice to reduce the immune system response that leads to intestinal damage and villous atrophy in celiac disease. BL-7010 actually binds to the gluten protein, reducing the protein's toxicity.The drug, with the gluten molecule attached, then passes harmlessly through the digestive system to be expelled as stool.

    BL-7010 has undergone safety testing in humans and was found to be well tolerated. According to BioLineRx, testing will begin in mid-2015 to see if the drug works as expected to diminish gluten's effects on the body.

    However, BL-7010 is designed to protect only against gluten cross-contamination; it won't allow people with celiac disease to eat large amounts of gluten.
      CCR9, by Chemocentryx, is a drug called vercirnon, which is also known as Traficet-EN, or CCX282B), and was originally intended for patients with moderate-to-severe Crohn's disease. CCR9 has completed one Phase 2 trial in 67 patients with celiac disease. However, despite the completion of the trial several years ago, no results relating to celiac disease have been made public or published.
      Egg Yolk Enzyme. Little is known about efforts to develop a celiac treatment that uses egg yolk to coat gluten and allow it to pass through the body undetected, thus preventing an adverse gluten reaction in sensitive individuals. Like most other drugs being developed, this treatment would work to prevent reactions to small amounts of gluten, rather than as a cure. 
      Larazotide Acetate by Alba Therapeutics.

    How it works: Larazotide acetate blocks a protein that carries pieces of gluten across the gut, where immune cells can see them. Fasano and his colleagues found that this carrier protein, called zonulin, is overproduced by celiac patients after they eat gluten.

    Results of the most recent phase 2 trial of larazotide acetate, published in February 2015 in Gastroenterology. The volunteers who took the drug experienced fewer days with disease symptoms during the 12 week-long study.
      Nexvax2, by ImmusanT, works much like an allergy shot. Nexvax2 exposes the immune system to gluten in a controlled way so that immune cells that are usually activated get turned off or eliminated.

    So far, Nexvax2 has completed a phase 1 trial showing it to be safe. More research is being done to test whether it is effective.

    Designed to work as a vaccine, Nexvax2 combines three proprietary peptides that elicit an immune response in celiac disease patients who carry the immune recognition gene HLA-DQ2. Similar to allergy shots, the vaccine is designed to reprogram gluten-specific T cells triggered by the patient's immune response to the protein.
      ZED1227 by Dr. Falk Pharma and Zedira recently announced the start of phase I clinical trials for the drug candidate ZED1227, a direct acting inhibitor of tissue transglutaminase. The small molecule targets the dysregulated transglutaminase within the small intestine in order to dampen the immune response to gluten which drives the disease process. Stay tuned for updates and progress reports as these drugs work their way through their various trial phases.
    Finally, share your thoughts on all these celiac drugs in the development pipeline. Are you excited, wary, both? Let us know by commenting below.
    Source:
    Gastroenterology Report


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/29/2017 - Currently, a gluten-free diet is the only way to manage celiac disease. Can a celiac vaccine change that? One company thinks so. ImmusanT corporation has developed a therapeutic vaccine, Nexvax2, that is specifically designed to treat celiac disease. The vaccine is an adjuvant-free mix of three peptides that include immunodominant epitopes for gluten-specific CD4-positive T cells. The vaccine is designed to neutralize gluten-specific CD4-positive T cells to further antigenic stimulation.
    As part of their efforts to evaluate the vaccine, a team of researchers recently set out to investigate the efficacy of epitope-specific immunotherapy targeting CD4-positive T cells in celiac disease. Specifically, they assessed the safety and pharmacodynamics of the Nexvax2 vaccine in patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet.
    An article detailing the findings of their most recent effort, titled Epitope-specific immunotherapy targeting CD4-positive T cells in celiac disease: two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled phase 1 studies, appeared in the Lancet.
    The research team included Gautam Goel, PhD, Tim King, MBBChir, A James Daveson, MBBS, Jane M Andrews, MBBS, Janakan Krishnarajah, MBBS, Richard Krause, MD, Gregor J E Brown, MBBS, Ronald Fogel, MDCM, Charles F Barish, MD, Roger Epstein, MD, Timothy P Kinney, MD, Philip B Miner Jr, MD, Jason A Tye-Din, MBBS, Adam Girardin, BS, Juha Taavela, MD, Alina Popp, MD, John Sidney, BS, Prof Markku Mäki, MD, Kaela E Goldstein, BS, Patrick H Griffin, MD, Suyue Wang, PhD, John L Dzuris, PhD, Leslie J Williams, MBA, Prof Alessandro Sette, DrBiolSc, Prof Ramnik J Xavier, MD, Prof Ludvig M Sollid, MD, Prof Bana Jabri, MD, and Dr Robert P Anderson, MBChB.
    To assess the safety and pharmacodynamics of the vaccine in patients with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet, ImmusanT recently conducted two randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1 studies at 12 community sites in Australia, New Zealand, and the USA, in HLA-DQ2·5-positive patients aged 18–70 years who had celiac disease and were following a gluten-free diet.
    The goal of the study was to document the number and percentage of adverse events in the treatment period in an intention-to-treat analysis.
    The study enrolled a total of 108 participants from Nov 28, 2012, to Aug 14, 2014, in the three-dose study, and from Aug 3, 2012, to Sept 10, 2013, in the 16-dose study.
    Overall, 62 (57%) of 108 participants were randomly assigned after oral gluten challenge and 20 (71%) of 28 participants were randomly assigned after endoscopy.
    None of the study participants, investigators, or staff knew which patients received a given treatment; these details were known only by the study’s lead pharmacist.
    In the three-dose study, participants received either Nexvax2 60 μg, 90 μg, or 150 μg weekly, or placebo over 15 days; in a fourth biopsy cohort, patients received either Nexvax2 at the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or a placebo.
    In the 16-dose study, participants received Nexvax2 150 μg or 300 μg or placebo twice weekly over 53 days; in a third biopsy cohort, patients also received either Nexvax2 at the MTD or a placebo. In both studies, about 5% of the participants reported were vomiting, nausea, and headache.
    Among participants given the MTD, four of eight subjects in the third cohort experienced adverse gastrointestinal treatment-emergent events; zero of three participants had adverse events in the biopsy cohort in the three-dose study, while five events occurred in five (63%) of eight participants in the first cohort, and three events in two (29%) of seven participants in the biopsy cohort of the 16-dose study.
    Those who received the vaccine at the MTD on either schedule showed no significant difference between average villous height to crypt depth ratio in distal duodenal biopsies, as compared with those who received placebo.
    In the 4-week post-treatment period, ascending dose cohorts underwent a further double-blind crossover, placebo-controlled oral gluten challenge, which had a fixed sequence. Meanwhile, biopsy cohorts received a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and quantitative histology within 2 weeks without oral gluten challenge. Of the participants who completed the post-treatment oral gluten challenge per protocol, interferon γ release assay to Nexvax2 peptides was negative in two (22%) of nine placebo-treated participants in the three-dose study.
    Compared with two (33%) of six who received Nexvax2 60 μg, five (63%) of eight who received Nexvax2 90 μg, and six (100%) of six who received Nexvax2 150 μg (p=0·007); in the 16-dose study, none (0%) of five placebo-treated participants had a negative assay versus six (75%) of eight who received Nexvax2 150 μg (p=0·021).
    The MTD of Nexvax2 was 150 μg for twice weekly intradermal administration over 8 weeks, which modified immune responsiveness to Nexvax2 peptides with no adverse impact on duodenal histology.
    Patients who received the intradermal administration of the vaccine reported gastrointestinal symptoms were not subtantially different to those seen with oral gluten challenge.
    While the commercial release of a viable vaccine is likely still some time away, early-phase trials have shown promise. Based on these results, ImmusanT will continue clinical development of this potentially therapeutic vaccine for celiac disease.
    Both trials were completed and closed before data analysis. Trials were registered with the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry, numbers ACTRN12612000355875 and ACTRN12613001331729.
    Source:
    The Lancet Affiliations:
    The researchers are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Center for Computational and Integrative Biology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA, the Broad Institute of Harvard and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, USA; the Department of Gastroenterology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand; the School of Medicine, University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD, Australia; the Department of Gastroenterology & Hepatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, SA, Australia; the Linear Clinical Research, Nedlands, WA, Australia; the Department of Gastroenterology, Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC, Australia; the Clinical Research Institute of Michigan, Chesterfield, MI, USA; the University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USA; Wake Gastroenterology and Wake Research Associates, Raleigh, NC, USA; Atlantic Digestive Specialists, Portsmouth, NH, USA; Ridgeview Medical Center, Waconia, MN, USA; Oklahoma Foundation for Digestive Research, Oklahoma City, OK, USA; ClinSearch, Chattanooga, TN, USA; the Immunology Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; the Murdoch Children's Research Institute and Department of Gastroenterology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, VIC, Australia; the Immunology Division, Walter and Eliza Hall Institute of Medical Research, Department of Medical Biology, University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia; the Tampere Center for Child Health Research and Department of Pediatrics, University of Tampere Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; the Tampere Center for Child Health Research and Department of Pediatrics, University of Tampere Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; the Alfred Rusescu Institute for Mother and Child Care and Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Bucharest, Romania; Division of Vaccine Discovery, La Jolla Institute for Allergy and Immunology, La Jolla, CA, USA; the Tampere Center for Child Health Research and Department of Pediatrics, University of Tampere Faculty of Medicine and Life Sciences and Tampere University Hospital, Tampere, Finland; the Centre for Immune Regulation, KG Jebsen celiac Disease Research Centre, and Department of Immunology, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; the Oslo University Hospital-Rikshospitalet, Oslo, Norway; Department of Pediatrics, Department of Medicine, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA; and ImmusanT in Cambridge, MA, USA.


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/12/2017 - The latest research report from HTF Market Intelligence Consulting is titled "Global Celiac Disease Drugs Market 2017-2021." The report offers detailed information and analysis of the competitive market landscape, forecast and strategies.
    The report covers geographic analysis that includes regions like Americas, APAC, EMEA, along with important players, including F. Hoffmann-La Roche, Johnson & Johnson, Merck, and Pfizer. It provides information, market insights, future trends and growth prospects for forecast period of 2017-2021.
    The report presents a detailed picture of the market by way of study, synthesis, and summation of data from multiple sources, and research analysts project the global market for celiac disease drugs to grow at a CAGR of 24.22% during the period through 2021.
    The primary treatment for celiac disease is still a completely gluten-free diet. There are a small number of anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressant drugs and nutritional supplements that are used as off-label, secondary treatments in celiac disease, but as yet, no drugs approved for primary treatment of celiac disease.
    Development of such treatments for celiac disease offers huge potential for profit to any company who can get a drug approved for the commercial market. The growth projections attempt to reflect the data behind a fast growing global market.
    Request a sample report at: htfmarketreport.com
     


  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...