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    Jefferson Adams

    Anti-Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Antibodies Common in People with Celiac Disease

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 06/26/2007 - In a study published recently in the Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, researchers found that celiac patients commonly have high rates of anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA). A team of researchers recently set out to assess the frequency anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae antibodies (ASCA) in patients with celiac disease.



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    The team was made up of Dorsaf Toumi; Amani MankaÏ; Ramla Belhadj; Leila Ghedira-Besbes; Moncef Jeddi; and Ibtissem Ghedira. They used ELISA to evaluate blood serum for ASCA, IgG and IgA in 238 patients with celiac disease. The team used 80 non-celiac blood donors as a control group. The 238 study subjects were divided into separate groups as follows: 125 untreated celiac patients; 42 celiac patients following a strict gluten-free diet; and 71 celiac patients who did not follow a gluten-free diet.

    Celiac Patients Have Significantly Higher IgG and IgA Antibodies

    Compared to the control group, the 125 untreated celiacs showed a markedly higher frequency of ASCA (IgG or IgA). 27.2% for untreated against 3.7% for control (p=10-5). Among the 71 patients who did not follow a gluten-free diet the occurrence of ASCA was significantly higher in adults than in children (60% against 26.1%, p=0.004). In the 238 patient study group as a whole, ASCA was substantially higher in adults than in children. 35.4% adults showed positive results compared to 21.1% children (p=0.01). Of the 238 subjects 19% (p=0.001), both children and adult, were positive for ASCA IgG versus 6.3% (p=0.001) for ASCA IgA.

    ASCA IgG More Common Than ASCA IgA

    Overall, ASCA IgG was much more common than ASCA IgA. 19% of children and 33% of adults were positive for ASCA IgG compared to 6.3% of children and 12.5% for ASCA IgA. Of the 42 patients who followed a gluten-free diet, all children and 90.5% of adults were negative for ASCA IgG.
    Of the 125 patients with untreated celiac, 20% of children were positive (p=0.01), and 34% of adults were positive. Of those 71 patients who did not comply with a gluten-free diet, 60% of adults and 26.1% of children were positive for ASCA.

    The results of the study confirm that patients with celiac disease show a high rate of ASCA. There was no statistical difference between celiacs following a gluten-free diet and those without celiac disease.

    Scandinavian Journal of Gastroenterology, Volume 42, Issue 7 2007 , pages 821 - 826

     

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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