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  • Jefferson Adams

    Are Doritos Gluten-Free?

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Are Doritos gluten-free and safe for your Super Bowl party? The answer is yes, no, and maybe. It depends on the Doritos.


    Image: CC--torroid
    Caption: Image: CC--torroid

    Celiac.com 01/08/2019 - Doritos are one of the perennially popular snacks. They are also a major favorite for Super Bowl parties. But are Doritos gluten-free? We’ve heard that question more than a few times. The answer varies by flavor. Some Doritos varieties are gluten-free, some are not, and other flavors are free of wheat, rye, barley and oats. Use this handy list to help you choose your gluten-free snacks when Super Bowl LIII kicks off on Sunday, Feb. 3rd.

    These flavors of Doritos are labeled as Gluten-Free:

    • DORITOS Simply Organic White Cheddar Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Toasted Corn Tortilla Chips



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    The following flavors of Doritos contain No Wheat, Rye, Barley or Oat ingredients:

    • DORITOS Blaze Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Cool Ranch Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Dinamita Chile Limón Flavored Rolled Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Flamas Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Jacked Ranch Dipped Hot Wings Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Nacho Cheese Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Poppin' Jalapeno Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Salsa Verde Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Simply Organic Spicy White Cheddar Flavored Tortilla Chips 
    • DORITOS Spicy Nacho Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Taco Flavored Tortilla Chips
    • DORITOS Tapatio Flavored Tortilla Chips

    To be 100% safe, those with celiac disease should only eat Doritos with "gluten-free" on the label. Although Frito-Lay does a thorough cleaning after each run, they cannot guarantee that the Doritos in the lower list are gluten-free below 20 ppm.

    Any Doritos flavor not listed above likely contains gluten. Check the Frito-Lay website to be sure.

    Edited by Jefferson Adams

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    Let's be real for a moment.  This would be an okay snack for a person concerned with eliminating or reducing gluten intake.  It is not particularly safe for gluten sensitivity or celiac patients due to several factors:

    1. gluten cross reactors: dairy

    2. toxic heat extracted oils (these include vegetable oil (typically soybean), corn, sunflower, safflower, seed & canola oils. Only extra-virgin (cold pressed) oils do not contain chemical residues of: hexane (a gasoline byproduct), bleach, deodorizers (used to mask odor from the putrification process), defoaming agents, fertilizers, etc.

    3. I tried "corn chips" once since it only contained corn & corn oil. The result?  Only 3 trips to the bathroom rather than the usual 27 that occurs with gluten exposure. 

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    19 hours ago, Guest Laura said:

    Let's be real for a moment.  This would be an okay snack for a person concerned with eliminating or reducing gluten intake.  It is not particularly safe for gluten sensitivity or celiac patients due to several factors:

    1. gluten cross reactors: dairy

    2. toxic heat extracted oils (these include vegetable oil (typically soybean), corn, sunflower, safflower, seed & canola oils. Only extra-virgin (cold pressed) oils do not contain chemical residues of: hexane (a gasoline byproduct), bleach, deodorizers (used to mask odor from the putrification process), defoaming agents, fertilizers, etc.

    3. I tried "corn chips" once since it only contained corn & corn oil. The result?  Only 3 trips to the bathroom rather than the usual 27 that occurs with gluten exposure. 

    I think we all know that chips are not a really healthy snack. But sometimes you might want to have some.  Dairy is safe for Celiacs.  there are people, Celiac and not Celiac,  who cannot digest lactose (in dairy) or are allergic to dairy.  But this myth of "gluten cross-reactors" is just a myth.  

    I have no idea if the stuff about the oils has any scientific basis - but they are gluten free.  And for the purposes of this topic, that's the important part.

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    If your still reacting there are "other" Options, I became allergic to corn soon after dia. and the dairy issues started with lactose intolerance almost 10 years prior and then got worse with a whey allergy later.

    Siete Foods Chips are Grain Free and very highly rated but rely heavy on starches, also dairy free nacho and ranch versions OH and this company makes vegan queso, and tortillas I have used in catering for a few years. https://sietefoods.com/collections/tortilla-chips
    Beanitos, bean based chips corn free https://www.beanitos.com/

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    Sonja: Of course, many snacks contain MSG. Some people have issues with MSG. Many do not. But that has nothing to do with gluten. A person with celiac disease could easily have problems with MSG, or not. People without celiac or gluten-sensitivity could also be fine with wheat, but have problems with MSG, or not. Depends on the person. Totally independent of wheat or celiac disease.

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    On 1/16/2019 at 4:22 PM, Guest Laura said:

    Let's be real for a moment.  This would be an okay snack for a person concerned with eliminating or reducing gluten intake.  It is not particularly safe for gluten sensitivity or celiac patients due to several factors:

    1. gluten cross reactors: dairy

    2. toxic heat extracted oils (these include vegetable oil (typically soybean), corn, sunflower, safflower, seed & canola oils. Only extra-virgin (cold pressed) oils do not contain chemical residues of: hexane (a gasoline byproduct), bleach, deodorizers (used to mask odor from the putrification process), defoaming agents, fertilizers, etc.

    3. I tried "corn chips" once since it only contained corn & corn oil. The result?  Only 3 trips to the bathroom rather than the usual 27 that occurs with gluten exposure. 

     

    On 1/17/2019 at 11:57 AM, kareng said:

    I think we all know that chips are not a really healthy snack. But sometimes you might want to have some.  Dairy is safe for Celiacs.  there are people, Celiac and not Celiac,  who cannot digest lactose (in dairy) or are allergic to dairy.  But this myth of "gluten cross-reactors" is just a myth.  

    I have no idea if the stuff about the oils has any scientific basis - but they are gluten free.  And for the purposes of this topic, that's the important part.

    The reason most celiacs cannot tolerate diary is because it's extremely difficult to digest lactose when the stomach's cilia are damaged and flattened against the stomach lining. This "flattening" reduces the amount of surface area on the cilia, making it harder to digest and gain nutrients from all food, let alone breaking down lactose. However, this really only applies when someone doesn't know they are allergic to gluten or when they first start out on a gluten-free diet. Once the cilia start to recover and begin "reaching out" again, most celiacs are then able to consume dairy products without much trouble. Unless, of course, they are lactose intolerant, which, as kareng points out, is a separate issue. I was very intolerant of dairy, at first, but after about six months on a gluten-free diet, it stopped being an issue.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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