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    At-Home Celiac Disease Test by imaware™ - A Product Review with Video

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      When he opened the At-Home Celiac Disease Test he discovered a beautifully packaged home collection kit that included two instruction cards on top.


    Caption: Image: imaware™ At-Home Celiac Disease Test

    Celiac.com 12/06/2018 - My friend Tim has been wondering for quite some time whether or not he might have celiac disease, but, for whatever reason, he hasn't been able to convince his doctor to test him for it. To finally settle the matter he decided to order an At-Home Celiac Disease Test by imaware™. (See the video of our experience below).

    Their web site was remarkably easy to use, and it took only a few minutes to order their home collection kit, which arrived a few days later. 


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    When he opened the At-Home Celiac Disease Test he discovered a beautifully packaged home collection kit that included two instruction cards on top. The first instructed him to watch an online video to see how to properly collect the sample, and the second card included six “Tips for successful blood collection,” which were covered in the video.

    Tim followed each step in the video and after washing his hands used the lancet to prick his finger. He was able to easily collect around five drops of blood to fill the collection tube to the proper level.

    After the sample was collected he put it in the return mailing envelope, which was included in the kit, and mailed it back to the imaware™ labs.  A couple of days later Tim received an email with a link to his test results. He followed the link to their secure site and logged back in to review his Celiac Disease Test Report, which was very clear and easy to read. 

    It turned out that Tim's results were negative for celiac disease, which came to him as both a surprise and a relief. He found the whole experience very empowering, and was glad to be able to finally, in the privacy of his own home, answer a long-standing question by using a simple, precise imaware™ At-Home Celiac Disease Test. 

    Visit their site for more info. 

    Video review:

    Visit their site for more info. 

     


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    To prevent false negatives for celiac disease, maybe you should consider a DNA test to determine if you have the variant.  This is how I deducted celiac disease after a diagnosis of IBS, countless tests, and uncontrollable symptoms for 27 years.    I used 23&Me, which has a health report sharing genetic variants that can cause diseases.  While it's not a diagnosis, if you carry the variant your chances increase for the disease.  This is just another tool in the tool box that I find it helpful.

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    My PCP had me tested and it came up negative as well.  She then told me, you are not Celiac, its all in your head, you need to start eating Gluten! 

    I then spoke to my gastroenterologist and he asked how long I had been on a gluten-free diet prior to taking the test. I told him about 9 months, to which he stated it should have come up negative.  According to him, the blood test checks for a particular enzyme which people who are celiac have and if you are not actively eating Gluten it will not show up in the test.  He concluded I have two choices:

    1 - start actively eating Gluten and in a month retake the test.

    2 - If I feel better then when I was eating Gluten, why change and continue a gluten-free Diet and continue feeling better.

    I chose # 2.

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    2 hours ago, FitnessPro said:

    My PCP had me tested and it came up negative as well.  She then told me, you are not Celiac, its all in your head, you need to start eating Gluten! 

    I then spoke to my gastroenterologist and he asked how long I had been on a gluten-free diet prior to taking the test. I told him about 9 months, to which he stated it should have come up negative.  According to him, the blood test checks for a particular enzyme which people who are celiac have and if you are not actively eating Gluten it will not show up in the test.  He concluded I have two choices:

    1 - start actively eating Gluten and in a month retake the test.

    2 - If I feel better then when I was eating Gluten, why change and continue a gluten-free Diet and continue feeling better.

    I chose # 2.

    Too bad your GP was not aware that all celiac testing requires you to be on a full gluten diet.  Your GI seems to be misinformed as well.  A gluten challenge requires a patient to go back on gluten for six to 12 weeks.  It can take that long for antibodies to show up in the blood stream.  

    Good luck on your continued journey towards good health.  Keep in mind that other autoimmune disorders can develop over time.  This is one reason that obtaining celiac diagnosis can be beneficial.  Another reason is that celiac disease is genetic.  All first degree relatives should be tested even if symptom free.  You can have celiac disease and be asymptomatic.  

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    Two of my children were diagnosed about 7 years ago and the yearly blood draws were quite traumatic for one of them. I did order this test and it was a much nicer experience for the younger one. The other preferred the blood draw because she picked on the wound and it bothered her so I guess, it is a matter of preference but it was great for our younger one. The fact that the head of the University of Chicago Celiac Center is on the advisory board of that company is also reassuring that the test does what it is supposed to do.

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