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    Scott Adams

    Better Methods for Diagnosing People with Latent Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Troncone R, Greco L, Mayer M, Mazzarella G, et. al.
    Gastroenterology, 1996; 111: 318-324



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    The final paragraph says:

    In conclusion, our data show that approximately half of the siblings of patients with celiac disease show signs of sensitization to gluten as they mount an inflammatory local response to rectal gluten challenge. The genetic background and the clinical meaning of such gluten sensitivity need to be established. Further studies, particularly at the jejunal level, are necessary before deciding if any action is to be taken in this subset of first-degree relatives.

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  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


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