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  • Jefferson Adams

    BioLineRX Announces Trial of New Celiac Drug

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Image: Public Media--BioLineRX
    Caption: Image: Public Media--BioLineRX

    Celiac.com 01/31/2014 - Drug company BioLineRx has announced trials of BL-7010, a drug for treating celiac disease. BL-7010 is a new, non-absorbable, orally available polymer with a high affinity for gliadins, the immunogenic proteins present in gluten that cause celiac disease.

    Image: Public Media--BioLineRXBL-7010 is intended to treat celiac disease by sequestering and effectively masking gliadins from enzymatic degradation and preventing the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger the classic adverse immune reaction.



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    The BL-7010 is then excreted with gliadin from the digestive tract, preventing the absorption of gliadin into the blood.

    The overall effect is to significantly reduce the immune response triggered by gluten. According to BioLineRX, pre-clinical studies have shown BL-7010 to be both safety and effective.

    BioLineRX's Phase 1/2 study is a two-part, both single and repeated, double-blind, placebo-controlled, dose escalation study of BL-7010 in up to 32 patients.

    The main goal is to gauge the safety of single and repeated increasing doses of BL-7010 in well-controlled celiac disease patients.

    They also hope to assess the results of systemic exposure, if any, of BL-7010 in the study patients.

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    Why in the world would I want to take a drug (which will definitely have side effects - they all do) to "treat" my celiac disease, when I have a proven, harmless, effective, inexpensive treatment already at my fingertips? I have no desire to EVER eat gluten again. I am perfectly happy being gluten free and I eat wholesome, delicious foods that nourish my body instead of destroying it. Recently, I was asked if I wanted to participate in clinical trials for a new "vaccine" for celiac disease. NO! Why would I take that kind of risk when I am already doing the best thing I can do for myself?

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    Why in the world would I want to take a drug (which will definitely have side effects - they all do) to "treat" my celiac disease, when I have a proven, harmless, effective, inexpensive treatment already at my fingertips? I have no desire to EVER eat gluten again. I am perfectly happy being gluten free and I eat wholesome, delicious foods that nourish my body instead of destroying it. Recently, I was asked if I wanted to participate in clinical trials for a new "vaccine" for celiac disease. NO! Why would I take that kind of risk when I am already doing the best thing I can do for myself?

    Why, you ask, Jacqie? Because this could change the lives of so many of us.

     

    I know, for myself, this would not change my overall eating habits. I too am (mostly) happy with my current diet. I eat very well also, and was never a big bread person. The biggest loss for me was the dairy, but I've made my peace with it.

     

    However, all that said I know there are a lot of people like me, who are so very limited in how they can function on a social level. For me, a cross-contamination event has a downtime of weeks to months. The pain and recovery are so intense and long lasting that eating out anywhere is simply not worth the risk. This is incredibly limiting. I cannot simply go out and order off the gluten free menu. There is no trust there. To get that freedom back, to be able to go (anywhere, vacations etc) with my spouse and not have to worry about how we are going to feed me, would be life changing. To order out and not worry about cross contamination. Amazing.

    Yes, there will likely be side effects, but until we know more, I would not completely discount the idea.

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    I have a very different opinion than Jacqie above. I spent the first 50 years of my life avoiding bread, pasta and such...anyway, I have no desire to ever eat that stuff again.

     

    But I long for a time I can just eat out with others without poring over every detail of a menu and interrogating waiters for ten minutes. Or get some occasional Chinese carry-out. Or travel without constant planning, worrying and a carry-on full of gluten-free food. Or just walk into any hole-in the wall ethnic restaurant and order something (obviously non-wheaty) I've never heard of, like I used to when I was a food blogger...

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    Why in the world would I want to take a drug (which will definitely have side effects - they all do) to "treat" my celiac disease, when I have a proven, harmless, effective, inexpensive treatment already at my fingertips? I have no desire to EVER eat gluten again. I am perfectly happy being gluten free and I eat wholesome, delicious foods that nourish my body instead of destroying it. Recently, I was asked if I wanted to participate in clinical trials for a new "vaccine" for celiac disease. NO! Why would I take that kind of risk when I am already doing the best thing I can do for myself?

    I totally agree with you. When I first started "gluten free" it was really hard to do--now two years later I realize it's the way you are supposed to eat anyway!! Just go with fresh meat, fruits and veggies. I have kept my weight down to perfect for 2 years. I wouldn't change a thing.

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    Why in the world would I want to take a drug (which will definitely have side effects - they all do) to "treat" my celiac disease, when I have a proven, harmless, effective, inexpensive treatment already at my fingertips? I have no desire to EVER eat gluten again. I am perfectly happy being gluten free and I eat wholesome, delicious foods that nourish my body instead of destroying it. Recently, I was asked if I wanted to participate in clinical trials for a new "vaccine" for celiac disease. NO! Why would I take that kind of risk when I am already doing the best thing I can do for myself?

    I wouldn't want to participate in a trial, either. But, if the drug is eventually proven safe and effective and could be taken to eliminate cross-contamination risks (like when eating out), I'm all for it!

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    Why in the world would I want to take a drug (which will definitely have side effects - they all do) to "treat" my celiac disease, when I have a proven, harmless, effective, inexpensive treatment already at my fingertips? I have no desire to EVER eat gluten again. I am perfectly happy being gluten free and I eat wholesome, delicious foods that nourish my body instead of destroying it. Recently, I was asked if I wanted to participate in clinical trials for a new "vaccine" for celiac disease. NO! Why would I take that kind of risk when I am already doing the best thing I can do for myself?

    Because the gluten free diet is much more expensive than a regular diet there are so many people around the world with not enough economic resources to achieve a complete gluten free diet.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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