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  • Melissa Reed
    Melissa Reed

    Birthdays: Easy Gluten Free Ice Cream Cake

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 08/14/2014 - I have missed ice cream cakes since I was diagnosed with celiac disease. Below is a make-ahead ice cream cake for a gluten-free birthday celebration, so that no one has to miss ice cream cake again!

    Photo: CC--Roco JulieYou will need:

    • 1 Gluten Free Betty Crocker Devil’s Food Cake Mix
    • ½ - 1 gallon Gluten Free Vanilla Ice Cream, or Favorite gluten-free Ice Cream Flavor
    • 1- 2 Containers Duncan Hines or other Gluten Free Fudge Frosting
    • Cake Decorating Frosting, optional to write happy birthday message
    • Candles, optional for birthday party.

    Directions:

    1. Bake the Gluten free Devil’s Food Cake as per box instructions, in two 8” cake pans. Remove from oven and cool.
    2. When the cake is completely cool, take the ice cream out of freezer to soften.
    3. Place one Gluten Free Cake Layer on a cake platter. Put an even layer of softened ice cream on top. Next, place the other Gluten Free Cake Layer on top of the softened ice cream. If the ice cream is getting to soft place the cake in the freezer for 10 minutes before frosting.
    4. After frosting the cake put it back into the freezer until about to serve.
    5. Take out 10 minutes before serving, add birthday candles to top if using and enjoy!
    6. “Eat well and live well!”-Melissa Bess Reed

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    I have always LOVED ice cream cake myself & this sounds like a wonderful alternative to satisfy my gluten-free lifestyle, which has been an uphill battle to eat the great foods I always loved & not feeling left out <3 Thank you so much for posting this--wish I'd thought of doing this myself, but that's why we have creative people such as yourself <3 Cannot wait to make this.

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    Hmm. I've always wondered how many people know or have been tested for dairy issues who have celiac disease or Gluten Intolerance (GI)?

     

    I did an interesting poll once and discovered that many, many people who were celiac were labeled lactose intolerant (which, really, they shouldn't be having dairy--or should at least use something to break the lactose down) and that almost all the people who had GI also had either a whey or a casein allergy (the two milk proteins in cow dairy--they shouldn't be having any cow dairy at all, because an allergy is hard on the body).

     

    That begs the question: should people with celiac and/or GI be eating any cow dairy at all? And if they do--are things like ice cream that are labeled gluten free also lactose free? (people with GI shouldn't have cow dairy period; you can't get rid of whey and/or casein proteins in ice cream)

     

    Some people are so sensitive to cow dairy they shouldn't have any at all; others can moderate/control and have a little bit (I'm talking about those with Gluten Intolerance). Still others are able to tolerate goat and sheep products, because their milk proteins are different than those from cow (like my family; we are GI).

     

    I sometimes wonder if celiacs and those with Gluten Intolerance would be healthier if they quit having any cow dairy products at all.

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    I love it!! My brother is having his 10th birthday today and sadly is gluten intolerant and can't eat normal ice cream cakes. He loves this exciting birthday ice cream cake!!

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    Hmm. I've always wondered how many people know or have been tested for dairy issues who have celiac disease or Gluten Intolerance (GI)?

     

    I did an interesting poll once and discovered that many, many people who were celiac were labeled lactose intolerant (which, really, they shouldn't be having dairy--or should at least use something to break the lactose down) and that almost all the people who had GI also had either a whey or a casein allergy (the two milk proteins in cow dairy--they shouldn't be having any cow dairy at all, because an allergy is hard on the body).

     

    That begs the question: should people with celiac and/or GI be eating any cow dairy at all? And if they do--are things like ice cream that are labeled gluten free also lactose free? (people with GI shouldn't have cow dairy period; you can't get rid of whey and/or casein proteins in ice cream)

     

    Some people are so sensitive to cow dairy they shouldn't have any at all; others can moderate/control and have a little bit (I'm talking about those with Gluten Intolerance). Still others are able to tolerate goat and sheep products, because their milk proteins are different than those from cow (like my family; we are GI).

     

    I sometimes wonder if celiacs and those with Gluten Intolerance would be healthier if they quit having any cow dairy products at all.

    My mom tries her best to keep my brother who's gluten intolerant away from milk and dairy products!

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  • About Me

    Melissa Bess Reed has been living gluten-free after diagnosed with celiac disease in 1998, and Hashimoto Thyroiditis in 2012. Both autoimmune disorders require a gluten-free diet. Melissa is a Chef in California where the farm to table is popular cuisine. She has professional membership in ACF Chefs. She is a Certified Medical Assistant via an Associate of Science Degree. She graduated top of her class Alpha Beta Kappa, enjoys volunteering and is an advocate for awareness. Melissa has a Harvard Medical School CME Certification for Celiac Disease Gluten-Free Diet Education and a current TAMU Certification for Celiac Disease. Holds a Great Kitchens NFCA Gluten-Free FOH Training Certificate. Gluten-free cookbook author, food blogger and recipe developer. Owns a Gluten-free business.
    PHOTO CREDIT: Kelly Segre

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