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  • Jefferson Adams

    BL-710 Wins Designation as EU Medical Device for Celiac Treatment

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 02/04/2016 - BL-7010, a non-absorbable, orally available co-polymer for the treatment of celiac disease, has received designation as Class IIb medical device in the European Union, according to manufacturer BioLineRx Ltd.

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--GilabrandThis designation clears path for BioLine’s BL-7010 program, and allows the company to plan the next steps in the development of a commercial version of BL-7010.



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    BL-7010 shows a high affinity for gliadins, the proteins in gluten that trigger celiac disease. BL-710 works by sequestering gliadins, effectively masking them from enzymatic breakdown, and blocks the formation of immunogenic peptides that trigger the adverse immune reactions in people with celiac disease. This results in a significantly reduced immune response triggered by gluten. Together with the gluten, BL-7010 passes harmlessly through the digestive tract and is not absorbed into the blood.

    The safety and efficacy of BL-7010 have been demonstrated in a number of pre-clinical studies, including a Phase 1/2 study completed in November 2014.

    In prepared comments, BioLineRX CEO Kinneret Savitsky, Ph.D., said that the company is "excited to receive confirmation for the medical device designation pathway in Europe for our BL-7010 program," and is now planning the next steps in the development of this product, including the next clinical efficacy study which we expect to commence in mid-2016."

    The company also continues to "evaluate the potential of BL-7010 as a food supplement," said Dr. Savitsky.

    Read more at: PRNewswire.

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    This device cannot get here soon enough. I have had two instances of severe reaction to gluten in the last three weeks. The latest while watching the Supper Bowl. It was a severe reaction!!!!! I have severe diarrhea now. I can expect the following days to be awful.... with a good possibility of hospitalization. Not exactly the best way to start the new year.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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