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  • Jefferson Adams

    Blocking Interleukin-15 May Treat Celiac Disease Symptoms

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    New study on blocking Interleukin-15 to treat celiac disease symptoms
    Caption: New study on blocking Interleukin-15 to treat celiac disease symptoms

    Celiac.com 03/18/2011 - By blocking an inflammatory protein called interleukin-15 (IL-15), doctors may be able to treat and prevent symptoms of celiac disease in some people, according to a new study in the journal Nature.

    The data suggest that the inflammatory response to gluten in people with celiac disease may be triggered by interleukin-15 and retinoic acid, which is a derivative of vitamin A.



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    The team notes that researchers previously thought that retinoic acid would lessen the inflammation in the intestine. Instead their study showed that it might actually worsen inflammation.

    According to Bana Jabri, MD, PhD, a member of the Celiac Disease Center and Comprehensive cancer Center at the University of Chicago, the team results showed that "elevated levels of IL-15 in the gut could initiate all the early stages of celiac disease in those who were genetically susceptible, and that blocking IL-15 could prevent the disease in our mouse model. It also demonstrated that in the treatment of inflammatory intestinal diseases, vitamin A and its retinoic acid metabolites are likely to do more harm than good.”

    The researchers found that by blocking IL-15 in mice that were genetically engineered to have celiac disease, they were able to reverse the symptoms, and the mice were able to eat gluten without suffering the symptoms of celiac disease.

    One reason this is good news, is that a number of medicines designed to block IL-15 are already being developed for other inflammation related diseases, such as rheumatoid arthritis.

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    By blocking the symptoms are we getting rid of the disease or just masking what the disease does to the body..that frightens me...most medicines today for anything in regular medical world will mask the symptoms..not get rid of..or prevent disease...

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    Immune responses induced by Pelargonium sidoides extract in serum and nasal mucosa of athletes after exhaustive exercise: modulation of secretory IgA, IL-6 and IL-15.

     

    Phytomedicine. 2011 Feb 15;18(4):303-8

     

    Authors: Luna LA, Bachi AL, Novaes e Brito RR, Eid RG, Suguri VM, Oliveira PW, Gregorio LC, Vaisberg M

     

    Abstract

    The evidence that exhaustive exercise may compromise the immune response is mainly confirmed by upper respiratory tract infections which are probably related to the decrease in secretory immunoglobulin A in the upper airway mucosa and/or profile changes of systemic cytokines as well as local cytokines of the upper respiratory tract. An extract from Pelargonium sidoides roots is currently used to treat infections in the upper airways. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the action of this herbal medicine on the immune response of athletes submitted to an intense running session by analyzing the production of immunoglobulin A in their saliva and of cytokines both locally and systemically, using a placebo as control. The results show that Pelargonium sidoides extract modulates the production of secretory immunoglobulin A in saliva, both interleukin-15 and interleukin-6 in serum, and interleukin-15 in the nasal mucosa. Secretory immunoglobulin A levels were increased, while levels of IL-15 and IL-6 were decreased. Based on this evidence, we suggest that this herbal medicine can exert a strong modulating influence on the immune response associated with the upper airway mucosa in athletes submitted to intense physical activity.

    PMID: 20850953 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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