Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Gryphon Myers

    Blood Pressure Drug Side Effects Mimic Celiac Disease

    Gryphon Myers
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 06/25/2012 - If you have received a celiac disease diagnosis while taking heart pressure medication, it turns out you might not actually have celiac disease. An investigation led by Dr. Joseph Murray has shown that certain blood pressure medication can cause symptoms not unlike those commonly attributed to celiac disease, and going off the drug can stop the symptoms.

    CC_Jesse_AlwinBetween 2008 and 2011, 22 patients on the blood pressure medication olmesartan (sold as Benicar) exhibited clear symptoms of celiac disease: intestinal inflammation and abnormalities, chronic diarrhea and weight loss (median weight loss of 39 pounds). One of the patients lost an astounding 125 pounds, and fourteen of the patients exhibited symptoms so severe as to require hospitalization.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    All of the patients were diagnosed with celiac disease based on symptoms and intestinal biopsy results, but gluten-free diet caused no improvement in any of the patients. Furthermore, their blood tests came back with results that did not match up with a celiac disease diagnosis.

    After taking the patients off olmesartan, all of their symptoms showed dramatic improvement. Eighteen of the 22 had subsequent intestinal biopsies, which revealed improvement in that area as well. It would seem then, that the medication causes celiac-like symptoms.

    Some in the medical community have questioned the causal relationship of olmesartan to the symptoms though. As Dr. Franz Messerli of St. Luke's-Roosevelt Hospital, New York argues, “Only re-exposure [to the drug] can confirm the GI side effects were indeed due to olmesartan.”

    The sample size has also been called into question by Dr. Henry Black of NYU-Langone Medical Center, who claims that the side effects are highly uncommon and that he uses the drug all the time with no adverse effects. Some have even proposed that the reaction is the result of a drug allergy rather than symptoms related to the mechanism of the drug itself.

    The conclusion one can draw from Dr. Murray's findings and subsequent criticisms, is that it is highly likely that olmesartan can cause celiac-like symptoms, but it is not entirely clear how often or why. Those who take it and experience such symptoms (or have gotten a celiac diagnosis while on the drug) should discuss switching to another medication with their doctors. It is still unclear if these symptoms are specific to olmesartan, or can be caused by the entire ARB family of drugs.

    As Dr. Murray says, "it's really an awareness issue. We want doctors to be aware of this issue, so if they see a patient who is having this type of syndrome — they think about medications as a possible association."

    Sources:

     

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    I started to respond to the original release of this information in Physician's First Watch (June 22) - entitled "Case Series Associates Olmesartan with Spruelike Disease." I was disappointed that the Mayo Clinic physicians Murray et al. made no mention of looking at the inactive ingredients in Olmesartan as a cause, as well as two other antihypertensive medications that also seem to cause celiac-like symptom. Two if not three of these have more than one form of cellulose and even talc (which should not be an issue); however Olmesartan, as well as at least one of the other contain lactose in as few forms. Seems like lactose intolerance would have been looked at as well - and this is often associated with celiac disease (or celiac-like response) from the damage to the epithelial cells that can't produce the lactase - though there is not mention of this in the full publication. Perhaps this is the reason there was no response to a gluten-free diet - perhaps dairy needed to be removed as well. You would have thought the patients would be aware of any lactose intolerance issue. In one of the medications I believe the lactose was 5x the amount of the active ingredient.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Gryphon Myers recently graduated from UC Berkeley with a degree in interdisciplinary studies, research emphasis in art, society and technology. He is a lifelong vegetarian, an organic, local and GMO-free food enthusiast and a high fructose corn syrup abstainer. He currently lives in Northern California. He also writes about and designs video games at Homunkulus.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Gregory M. Glenn is in the USDA-ARS Bioproduct Chemistry and Engineering Research Unit. Celiac.com 09/29/2004 - Those lightweight, polystyrene containers that some restaurants give you for carrying home leftovers or take-out meals are known in the foodservice industry as clamshells. Their hinged-lid construction indeed resembles the architecture nature uses for clams, oysters, and other familiar bivalves.
    Every year, billions of these clamshells and other foodservice containers made from petroleum-based foams end up in already overstuffed landfills. Slow to decompose, they become yet another environmental burden.
    But the containers, along...

    Dr. Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.
    Recently I have noticed a trend in articles that demonize the gluten-free diet, and imply that there is something unhealthy or even dangerous about it. Here is an example of one that I forwarded to Dr. Ron Hoggan:
    http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/11017/1118230-114.stm
    and below is his response to its author:
    Dear China Millman,
    Thank you for your interesting article on gluten-free dieting.  I was very pleased to read that you include patients with non-celiac gluten sensitivity among those who should follow a gluten free diet.  I assume that you have arrived at your estimate of 2...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/15/2013 - For gluten-free Americans who love donuts, life just got a little bit better. That's because Dunkin’ Donuts has announced plans to offer gluten-free donuts and muffins in all its US stores by the end of the 2013.
    The Canton-based company field tested gluten-free products in a handful of locations around Boston and Miami, news of which generated considerable social media buzz.
    This news is certainly much heralded by many gluten-free eaters, so it will be interesting to see what the response is like, and how Dunkin' Donuts fares.
    Certainly, the timing is right, with the market for gluten-free goods continuing to see double d...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/12/2014 - Are celebrity claims of weight loss and improved health on a gluten-free diet driving people without celiac disease to temporarily inflate the market for gluten-free foods? Is that market headed for a downtrun if these people go back to gluten?
    The market for gluten-free food has definitely gotten a boost from people looking to gluten-free food to help them lose weight or to improve their health, even though there is no good science to support such claims. More than half of the 90-plus million Americans who follow a gluten-free diet believe the diet to be “healthier” and more than one-quarter do so to lose weight. So what hap...