Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Record is Archived

    This article is now archived and is closed to further replies.

    Scott Adams

    Breast Feeding and Celiac Disease

    Scott Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    This article comes to us from Karoly Horvath, M.D., khorvath@POL.NET, who is one of the two directors of the celiac center at University of Maryland in Baltimore.

    Breast milk contains antibodies against all the antigens the mothers immune system has met prior to or during the pregnancy and has produced antibodies to them.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    This system is the wisdom of nature and this is the way that mothers milk protects babies from all the antigens (infectious agents, toxins etc.) occurring in the environment where the mother lives. These antigens without this protection may enter the body through the digestive or respiratory systems. The best example is that breast milk protects babies from bacteria causing diarrheas in the underdeveloped countries.

    The antibodies are produced by the cells (plasma cells) localized in the gut and the lung. These cells are migrating to the lactating breast-tissue for hormonal trigger (enteromammal plasma cell circle) and they continue producing these antibodies in the breast. These antibodies appear in the breast milk. In brief, the breast milk may contain all the antibodies the mother has in her digestive and respiratory systems. The function of these antibodies is to block the entrance of antigens infectious agents, toxins, allergens etc) across the digestive or respiratory tract of babies.

    In case of celiac disease, it means that if the mother has circulating antibodies to gliadin, these antibodies appear in the milk. If the breast fed baby ingests gliadin (or the mother ingests accidentally and traces of gliadin appear in the milk) the antibodies in the milk blocks the gliadin and it will not able to cross the intestinal wall and meet with the babys immunosystem. Theoretically, the breast-fed infant do not have any immunoreaction to gliadin. If the mother accidentally ingests gliadin during breast feeding it is likely that the concentration of antigliadin antibodies become higher in the breast milk.

    To answer the question: the antibodies in breast milk are protective and do not "trigger" celiac disease in genetically predisposed babies. There are several data showing that breast-feeding has a protective effect in case of celiac disease. Furthermore, it is well documented that breast-feeding in the first year of life decreases the risk of allergies by 50% in babies whose parents have allergies.

    As far as the reaction after weaning concerned: it is also known that babies may have some reaction (loose stool or spit up or discomfort) transiently after introducing a new food, however, this is a temporary symptom and not allergy or immunoreaction to the food. It is likely that their digestive system should accommodate to the new foods.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Guest
    This is now closed for further comments

  • About Me

    Scott Adams was diagnosed with celiac disease in 1994, and, due to the nearly total lack of information available at that time, was forced to become an expert on the disease in order to recover. In 1995 he launched the site that later became Celiac.com to help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives.  He is co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of the (formerly paper) newsletter Journal of Gluten Sensitivity. In 1998 he founded The Gluten-Free Mall which he sold in 2014. Celiac.com does not sell any products, and is 100% advertiser supported.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    I have a big issue with what I believe to be a misleading headline in a recent joint press release by Domino's Pizza and the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness (NFCA)...here is the headline:
    "Domino’s Pizza Becomes First National Pizza Delivery Chain to Offer Gluten Free Crust"
    When you read the release further, starting at the 5th paragraph, which many people will never get to, it says:
    "While Domino’s new Gluten Free Crust is appropriate for those with mild gluten sensitivity, Domino’s and the NFCA do not recommend it for those with celiac disease. Domino’s and the NFCA found that while the crust is certified as gluten free, c...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 03/28/2014 - Great news for some celiac and gluten-intolerant folks in Colorado! Legal marijuana sales began in Colorado on Jan. 1, 2014, and new shop owners have been surprised to find a strong the market for marijuana edibles. More and more, makers of these edibles are including gluten-free selections.
    In some ways, it seems both natural and inevitable that the rising retail market for gluten-free good and the rising retail market for edible cannabis products should overlap.
    That is what is happening now in Colorado. As marijuana retailers such to meet the demand for weed, they are also rushing to meet the demand for edible cannabis...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/13/2014 - As the number of students eating gluten-free continues to rise, colleges and universities are scrambling to keep up with an increasing demand for gluten-free options.
    The latest news comes from the University of Wisconsin, where the Net Nutrition program enables students with food allergies to more easily navigate the cafeteria.
    The program allows people to screen for allergens and food intolerance, and offers an easy way to subtract menu items a person cannot have, she said. UW’s dining halls have incorporated gluten-free items such as pizza, pasta, deserts and various baked goods, while Union South has also incorporated g...

    Nicole Vela
    Celiac.com 06/17/2014 - Ever notice how much our social lives are based around food? Or how much food is all around us? I took my son to a local children’s exhibit today with shops and about twenty different restaurants, cafes and bakeries we had to walk by. Do I feel bad always having to say no? Of course I do. What mom wouldn’t? There may have been some safe choices but I try to do my research ahead of time when I can call the places to see what their cross contamination procedures are.
    We don’t ever get a day off from food allergies. It is constant. I think one of the best things you can do on a gluten free diet is to inform others,actively campa...