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    Jefferson Adams

    Buckwheat Flour Makes Healthier, Better Tasting Gluten-free bread

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    According to a new study, buckwheat flour makes healthier bread
    Caption: According to a new study, buckwheat flour makes healthier bread

    Celiac.com 09/28/2010 - Buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads taste better than regular gluten-free breads, and have properties that may benefit people with celiac disease, according to a new study.

    Moreover, buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free flour could be used to create high quality, antioxidant rich bread products that benefit people with celiac disease and offer new market possibilities, says the team behind the study, M. Wronkowska, D. Zielinska, D. Szawara-Nowak, A. Troszynska, and leader M. Soral-Smietana of the Polish Academy of Sciences.



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    Soral-Smietana notes that buckwheat's mineral content and antioxidant activity make it ideal for new buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads. Buckwheat flour contains high-quality proteins, and is rich in antioxidants and minerals such as, flavonoids, phenolic acids, B vitamins , and carotenoids. Because of these properties, Buckwheat has recently caught the attention of food scientists.

    In their study, the research team found that enriching gluten-free flour with 40 per cent buckwheat flour creates gluten-free bread “with more functional components and higher anti-oxidative and reducing capacities,” in addition to offering health benefits to people with celiac disease.

    To produce their buckwheat-enhanced gluten-free breads for the study, the team replaced between ten and 40 per cent of corn starch with flour made from common buckwheat Fagopyrum esculentum Moench. Corn starch is a common ingredient in gluten-free breads.

    They found that gluten-free bread enhanced with 40 per cent buckwheat flour had the highest antioxidant capacity and reducing capacity, and this was positively correlated with their total phenolic contents. The 40 per cent enhanced bread also demonstrated the highest overall sensory quality when compared to a gluten-free bread control.

    The team found that higher buckwheat concentrations made for higher levels of magnesium, phosphorus and potassium. From their results, they concluded that gluten-free bread formulated with 40 per cent buckwheat flour could be developed and dedicated to those people suffering from celiac disease. In addition to being healthier than current gluten-free breads, such bread would also likely taste better, because the “…overall sensory quality of buckwheat enhanced breads was significantly higher than that obtained for gluten-free bread.”

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    I can't eat any of the gluten free breads or other baked goods that are on the market. I'm severely allergic to corn, and to the sulfites that are used to bleach or process food starches. It would be ideal if some companies would produce a least some products that could be eaten by people who need to avoid corn and sulfites, as well as gluten. I really like buckwheat, and eat it quite often.

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    Great to see the professionals confirming what I have felt about buckwheat since I started cooking gluten free a year ago! I saw a comparison of most gluten free flours and picked buckwheat and quinoa as being more nutritious than usual rice, tapioca and cornflour mixes. Has any similar study been done on Quinoa? Would be interested to see how that compares with buckwheat. I regularly use quinoa, dessicated coconut and ground linseed instead of plain rice flour as they both provide more fiber to keep things moving.

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    Buckwheat is great...I discovered it in 1994 in the USA and have been a fan ever since. It tastes great and it has that sticky quality that is needed in bread. Great to see that the experts have found it too! I hope it becomes more popular and available from now on.

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    I can't eat any of the gluten free breads or other baked goods that are on the market. I'm severely allergic to corn, and to the sulfites that are used to bleach or process food starches. It would be ideal if some companies would produce a least some products that could be eaten by people who need to avoid corn and sulfites, as well as gluten. I really like buckwheat, and eat it quite often.

    Hi I realize this response is two years after submitted article on buckwheat, but I just found it now. I am new to gluten free baking and struggle with quantities for buckwheat, like in pancake mixture , what do you mix it with. Love to know more.

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    Hi I realize this response is two years after submitted article on buckwheat, but I just found it now. I am new to gluten free baking and struggle with quantities for buckwheat, like in pancake mixture , what do you mix it with. Love to know more.

    I love buckwheat pancakes and make them every Sunday. I use 100% buckwheat flour, a couple of eggs and mix in water until the desired consistency is reached. It is best to hand mix with a whisk. I do this the night before, and then let the batter sit in the refrigerator for 12 hours (seems to make a better pancake). I use coconut oil on a non-stick skillet, Pour a ladle full onto the skillet, let it cook almost all the way through. (this is the trick most people don't know, as soon as the pancake is cooked all the way through it will hold together, if it is not ready to be flipped it will fall apart and make a huge mess). I usually mix up some toppings, whether it be slightly stir fried apples with some berries, or even an egg over easy with stir fried veggies if you are trying to avoid sugar.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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