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  • Jefferson Adams

    Can a Gluten-free Diet Make You Healthier, More Alert?

    Jefferson Adams
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    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 12/17/2015 - A landmark study shows that a gluten-free diet lessens fatigue, raises energy levels, and promotes healthier bodies.

    Photo: CC--Allan AjifoFunded by the university, the British government and Genius Foods, and conducted by Aberdeen University's Rowett Institute of Nutrition and Health, the 'Going Gluten Free' study is the largest of its kind conducted to date in the UK.



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    For the study, researchers asked 64 adult women and 31 adult men, to adopt a gluten-free diet for three weeks and then to return to their 'normal' diet for the same period.

    The average study participant was 38 years old, with a BMI of 24.8. In general, those who followed a gluten-free diet a more fiber and less salt, which lowered both cholesterol and glucose levels in the blood.

    Study subjects also reported a reduction in stomach cramps and higher energy levels during the gluten-free spell. Moreover, vitamin B12 and folate remained stable during the gluten-fee period, suggesting participants were not taking in fewer vitamins.

    So, basically, even for people without celiac disease or gluten-intolerance, eating gluten-free can be part of a healthy diet.

    It's not just celebrities like Gwyneth Paltrow and Novak Djokovic who have adopted a gluten-free diet, but millions of regular folks with no history or indication of celiac disease. This study suggests those folks may all be reaping some health benefits as a result.

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    Elevated cholesterol and subsequent arterial disease will decrease perfusion to the brain, as well as to the rest of the body. But what if you eat 3 gluten free steaks per day, with gluten free tots and a gluten free ice cream desert. Yeah. This article is bunk.

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    I totally agree with kwixote - there is no corelation to intelligence shown here at all. Not only that - but just saying celebrities eating gluten free must be reaping some health benefits - pffft! If you ate gluten free products and nothing else you'd certainly not be very healthy.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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