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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Can a New Drug Ease Gluten Effects in Celiac Patients on Gluten-free Diet

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

      Can Amgen's anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, AMG 714, protect celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, thus reducing symptoms and effects of accidental gluten exposure?


    Caption: Image: CC--Richard Masoner

    Celiac.com 05/25/2018 - People with celiac disease need to follow a lifelong gluten-free diet. However, once their guts have healed, they can still be sensitive to gluten. Sometimes even more sensitive than they were before they went gluten-free. Accidental ingestion of gluten can trigger symptoms in celiac patients, such as pain in the gut and diarrhea, and can also cause intestinal damage. 

    A new drug being developed by a company called Amgen eases the effects of people with celiac disease on a gluten-free diet. Researchers working on the drug have announced that their proof-of-concept study shows AMG 714, an anti-IL-15 monoclonal antibody, potentially protects celiac patients from inadvertent gluten exposure by blocking interleukin 15, an important mediator of celiac disease, and leads to fewer symptoms following gluten exposure.

    The drug is intended for people with celiac disease who are following a gluten-free diet, and is designed to protect against modest gluten contamination, not to permit consumption of large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.

    AMG 714 is not designed for celiac patients to eat gluten at will, but for small, incidental contamination. Francisco Leon, MD, PhD, study director and consultant for Amgen, says that their team is looking at AMG 714 “for its potential to protect against modest contamination, not deliberately eating large amounts of gluten, like bread or pasta.” 

    Amgen hopes that AMG 714 will help celiac patients on a gluten-free diet to experience fewer or less sever gluten-triggered events.

    Findings of the team’s first phase 2 study of a biologic immune modulator in celiac disease will be presented at the upcoming Digestive Disease Week 2018. 

    Read more at ScienceDaily.com


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    Everyone should sign up. Better die as a guinea pig than die daily anyway from constant stress and cross-contamination. As if having to stop eating virtually everything isn't bad enough that cross contamination should exist.
    Can't be many worse feelings than the one you get upon reading "may contain traces of gluten' on a package of food that you are willing to buy and eat, not because you actually like it, but cause it's one of the few viands you are actually allowed to eat. Quinoa has always been expensive anyway hah

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    Not sure if this can be printed or not, but I've found gluten-free lipsticks on Amazon!  Thank goodness.  There are lots of items listed on Amazon and that has put me in touch with many companies that offer gluten-free items.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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