Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Can a Quick and Easy Quiz Determine Gluten-free Diet Success?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.   eNewsletter: Get our eNewsletter

    Celiac.com 03/01/2012 - Currently, the best way to assess whether patients with celiac disease are actually maintaining a strict gluten-free diet is to have trained experts conduct a dietary interview. These interviews can vary in complexity, depending on the nature and number of the questions, and on the amount of medical expertise required to score the responses.

    Photo: Leeds Museums Galleries, UK.A team of researchers has developed a way to score gluten-free dietary adherence  based on answers to four quick and easy questions that can be assessed by non-expert personnel. The researchers recently set out to test the reliability of their questionnaire in a new group of patients.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    The research team includes F. Biagi, P.I. Bianchi, A. Marchese, L. Trotta, C. Vattiato, D. Balduzzi, G. Brusco, A. Andrealli, F. Cisarò, M. Astegiano, S. Pellegrino, G. Magazzù, C. Klersy, and G.R. Corazza.

    They are affiliated with the Coeliac Centre/First Department of Internal Medicine of the Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo at the University of Pavia in Pavia, Italy.

    The scoring for the quiz is set up to verify adherence to a gluten-free diet. The questionnaire has a five-level score.

    From March 2008 to January 2011, the team surveyed 141 celiac disease patients who were undergoing re-evaluation. Each patient was following on a gluten-free diet.

    The team then compared survey scores with levels of both villous atrophy and endomysial antibodies (EMA). Patients with persistence of either villous atrophy (Fisher's exact, P < 0·001; test for trend, P < 0·001) or positive EMA (Fisher's exact, P = 0·001; test for trend, P = 0·018) showed the lowest scores, which indicates poor compliance with a gluten-free diet.

    Given that the celiac patients have been well instructed on what a gluten-free diet means and on how to follow it, our questionnaire is a reliable and simple method to verify compliance to a gluten-free diet. The team did not share in the study abstract the exact questions included in the survey, so stay tuned to find out the exact questions the team is testing.

    Source:

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    There are no comments to display.



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2004 Oct;16(10):961-8. Celiac.com 07/12/2005 - In an effort to determine the role of T-cells in celiac disease, researchers in Ireland examined the cells taken from the duodenal biopsies of both treated and untreated celiac disease patients. An assessment was made of the samples cell yields, and analyses were done to determine their viability and...

    Tina Turbin
    Celiac.com 06/28/2010 - Studies on the genetic links to celiac disease are leading to more research which may lead to new and more effective ways to treat the disease, an exciting  prospect for celiacs who may want to enjoy some gluten now and then.  Celiac disease is an autoimmune disease, the source of this being gluten, a protein found in wheat, rye, and barley, affecting about 1...

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 12/15/2010 - A small study in Swedish children has found no association between early childhood psychological stress and later development of celiac disease. Previous studies have shown links between psychological stress and a number immunological diseases, such as inflammatory bowel disease.
    A team of researchers sought to look more closely at the connection between...

    Kristina Campbell
    Celiac.com 03/15/2011 - For celiacs, it's not really the cinnamon bun that's the enemy. Nor the pizza crust, nor the ravioli. It's the gliadin in these foods - the alcohol-soluble portion of the gluten protein - that's the real culprit.
    Gliadin is the "gladiator" of the human digestive tract. When we ingest gliadin, enzymes try to break it down into a form that can be absorbed...

  • Forum Discussions

    Yup, and I expect most of those reactions happen because the makeup/lip balm..ect ends up in their mouth in inadvertently and then into the GI tract. 
    Celiac disease is very clearly defined and is triggered by the gliadin molecule leaking into the lining of the small intestine. It then causes an inflammatory reaction that then causes a multitude of secondary issues. That said, many...
    It's good to hear things are more or less under control now. Sounds like quite a medical ordeal you have been through and a long winding rode. Thanks for sharing. So many more medical problems are autoimmune based than most people realize...