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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Can Amy's Work Their Gluten-Free Magic into Drive Thru Magic?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Can Amy's turn their great gluten-free options into drive-thru success?

    Can Amy's Work Their Gluten-Free Magic into Drive Thru Magic? - Can Amy's spin their gluten-free food into drive-thru success? Photo: CC--theimpulsivebuy
    Caption: Can Amy's spin their gluten-free food into drive-thru success? Photo: CC--theimpulsivebuy

    Celiac.com 09/26/2017 - If you've ever eaten any of the gluten-free foods made by Amy's, then you know their commitment to taste, quality, and solid gluten-free options. Bolstered by their success in the commercial grocery markets, Amy's is moving into fast food. Not just fast food, drive-through fast food.

    Amy's Drive Thru opened its first location in Rohnert Park, California back in 2015, where it was quickly embraced as a healthier, more ethical alternative to other fast food chains.



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    Amy's Drive Thru is now set to open a second store in Corte Madera in 2018, followed by five more locations in northern California.

    All Amy's food is 100% vegetarian and organic, with a menu ranging from burgers and burritos to pizza and mac-n-cheese, and, of course, plenty of gluten-free and vegan options.

    Made from organic, locally sourced ingredients where possible, the recipes are often come from the family recipe books of Amy's own employees. For early birds, Amy's also offers a breakfast menu.

    So if you're find yourself in looking for quick, delicious gluten-free options in northern California, look for Amy's Drive Thru.



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    As a very sensitive celiac. I tried several of Amy's so called gluten free frozen products. Each time I got glutenated. They are not made in a gluten-free factory. I found ingredients in Amy products like Maltodextrin, sauces with Carmel coloring, starches that did not specify what they were made with. I have autoimmune reaction to carrageenan and some of their products have this in it. They do not specify if their dairy products contain carrageenan or artificial flavorings either. Long story short, avoid so called gluten free Amy's products. They are cross contamination and contain hidden gluten. Eat at your own risk.

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    As a very sensitive celiac. I tried several of Amy's so called gluten free frozen products. Each time I got glutenated. They are not made in a gluten-free factory. I found ingredients in Amy products like Maltodextrin, sauces with Carmel coloring, starches that did not specify what they were made with. I have autoimmune reaction to carrageenan and some of their products have this in it. They do not specify if their dairy products contain carrageenan or artificial flavorings either. Long story short, avoid so called gluten free Amy's products. They are cross contamination and contain hidden gluten. Eat at your own risk.

    Hopefully you have notified both Amy's and the FDA about this. I also hope you saved your packages or made note of the manufacturer's lot number. Because that's the only way to know whether you got "glutinated," or weather you simply reacted to something else.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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