Jump to content



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):



Celiac.com Sponsor (A1-m):


  • You've found your Celiac Tribe! Join our like-minded, private community and share your story, get encouragement and connect with others.

    💬

    • Sign In
    • Sign Up
  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Can Gluten in Orthodontic Retainers Trigger Ongoing Celiac Symptoms?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 08/22/2014 - It is often hard to tell if isolated case reports have anything to contribute to the larger understanding of celiac disease. However, some case reports are enough in themselves to cause reflection, whatever their contribution to the larger scientific understanding may be.

    Photo: Wikimedia Commons--clockfaceFor most people with celiac disease, symptoms disappear and healing begins with the adoption of a gluten-free diet. For one 9-year-old girl, however, the battle to beat her symptoms and feel better did not end with a gluten-free diet.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):






    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12-m):




    The girl had initially complained of non-specific abdominal discomfort, and showed positive blood tests for celiac disease. Duodenal biopsies revealed Marsh 3B histopathology. So, she definitely had celiac disease with corresponding symptoms. Despite following a strict gluten-free diet, the girl continued to have symptoms and show positive blood tests for active disease.

    Gluten is a common additive in plastics. After some detective work, the team discovered that the child was being exposed to gluten from her orthodontic retainer that contained a plasticized methacrylate polymer.

    She discontinued its use and her symptoms disappeared and her celiac blood tests returned to normal.

    This case illustrates that, even for patients on the strictest gluten-free diet, exposure to non-dietary sources of gluten, such as those used to make plastics, dental equipment, and cosmetics, can trigger or exacerbate celiac disease symptoms. This case also emphasizes the importance of ferreting out and removing all possible sources of gluten, including non-dietary, when managing celiac disease.

    Source:



    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments



    I am in the dental field and heavily involved in research in materials in the dental field.

    It is my strong opinion, that the retainer has nothing to do with the celiac symptoms. Even if at one point of time, there was gluten in the resin (but there was not), it would be bound in the resin and there is no way that 20ppm (the upper limit of gluten in a substance to be safe) would go through the stomach and ever reach the small intestine. It is my strong opinion that the retainer was not the source of the problem. Something else was the problem and whatever it was, happened to coincide with the retainer. Anecdotal reports like these cause unnecessary fear.

    I can not post a link but I suggest to search the glutenfreedietician site and this topic is discussed there also.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    Can you please provide more information on what to ask my doctor about this potential gluten containing mater? I think I have this issue, but my appliance is not optional.

    You should read "Do parents of children with celiac disease really have to worry that their children's retainers contain gluten?" by Amy Jones, MS, RD and Tricia Thompson, MS, RD, at the Gluten Free Dietitian.

     

    They conclude that the one case mentioned in this presentation gives insufficient data to draw definite conclusions or cause concerns for wearers of dental appliances.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Please do be more specific - if you know what types. I'm an adult but wear a retainer (only once a week). I've been gluten-free for 8 months and still do not feel good. Wondering if it is the retainer. My retainer does not look like the picture above but is more of a mouthpiece that a fighter might wear - clear plastic

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    Excellent article my son just got a retainer and I knew about the possible contamination from the product I informed my sons orthodontist I made sure from the lab that there was not any product in my sons material . I work in a GI office in buffalo

    NY and I feel I know more about the possibilities of cross contamination then the general public I wish people were more educated about this.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    I am in the dental field and heavily involved in research in materials in the dental field.

    It is my strong opinion, that the retainer has nothing to do with the celiac symptoms. Even if at one point of time, there was gluten in the resin (but there was not), it would be bound in the resin and there is no way that 20ppm (the upper limit of gluten in a substance to be safe) would go through the stomach and ever reach the small intestine. It is my strong opinion that the retainer was not the source of the problem. Something else was the problem and whatever it was, happened to coincide with the retainer. Anecdotal reports like these cause unnecessary fear.

    I can not post a link but I suggest to search the glutenfreedietician site and this topic is discussed there also.

    It's negative close-minded thinking like this that keep celiac disease cloaked in 'mystery'. Someday all pediatricians will test all children for gluten issues BEFORE they prescribe pharmaceuticals that merely mask symptoms.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites
    I didn't know plastics could contain gluten. Does anyone know if plastic water bottles and food containers contain gluten? Such as: #1, 2, 4 and 5? I have to drink bottled spring water, that is in plastic gallon jugs.

    Don't forget envelopes and many forms of glue.

    Link to comment
    Share on other sites



    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Restore formatting

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17-m):




  • Related Articles

    Kim Hopkins
    Celiac.com 10/16/2009 - With the downturn in our economy, it is certainly not news that many more Americans are needing to rely on food pantries and soup kitchens to feed themselves.  It is also not news that restricted diets, especially the gluten free diet, are very expensive.  If you need to eat "special" foods and cannot afford to pay for them, where do you turn?
    I have communicated with several people recently who are in this predicament.  One woman reported that, when she explained her food allergies and intolerance to her local food pantry, they replied, "If you are hungry enough, you'll eat it" - referring to foods that contain unsafe ingredients.  This made my stomach turn.  Although much work has been done in recent years to educate the public about food allergies, intolerance, and sensitivities, clearly there is still more to do.
    So what should someone in this situation do?  It got me thinking.  I called my state's Food Bank to ask if they get requests for special foods due to restricted diets.  I spoke with the food solicitor, who definitely understood the question I was posing.  She said that the agencies that disseminate the food have received requests to meet special diets due to food allergies and celiac disease, but the Food Bank has not been able to meet these requests.  They simply have not received donations of such foods.  I was given the impression that they won't be formally soliciting for allergen-friendly foods, but that they would alert their large network if these foods are donated.
    So who is likely to be the most sensitive to this need and knowledgeable about gluten and the top 8 food allergens?  US!  Those of us who have learned to live without common foods due to the risk of severe illness.  What can we do? 
    We can talk to our state and/or local food pantries and soup kitchens and see if they have received requests for gluten and/or allergen-free foods; We can make donations of special foods and request (even in writing) that these foods be reserved for those who need them; We can talk to our networks of those with dietary restrictions (local support groups, on line chat groups, family/friends, etc.) and ask them to do the same;  We can link our local support groups with a food pantry/soup kitchen so that if a request comes in, the support group can try to meet it;  If there are many request coming in, we can organize a "special" food drive or a fundraiser to purchase these foods, which has the added bonus of educating others and spreading awareness. Ideas for gluten free and/or allergen free items to donate include soups, cereals, flours, dried beans, dried lentils, pasta, quinoa, and millet.  Some have the capacity to accept frozen and fresh foods, too.
    The growing number of those of us with celiac disease alone has recently catapulted our community into the lime light.  Let's use those numbers to do some good!


    Carol Frilegh
    Celiac.com 05/03/2010 - Place a single tiny droplet of food coloring on a solid surface, a small plate will do nicely. Don't move it or touch it. What happens? Usually nothing.
    Do the same thing in a saucer of water and now what happens? The color spreads and permeates the water.
    This similar to the effects of eating a tiny amount of food restricted from your Celiac diet.  I follow The Specific Carbohydrate Diet and it demands scrupulous attention to the kind of food I use and what is in it.
    The reason is that minuscule amounts of what we consider "The Undigestibles," feed bad gut bacteria, strengthen them, allow them to multiply and subdue friendly bacteria, all at the expense of a compromised digestive system.
    There are ways to determine food ingredients. We have all become more conscious of labels in recent years. Some tell us what is not in the product. I think for most of us celiacs, the magic words are "gluten-free."  The Specific Carbohydrate Diet contingent is very fond of  "free of starch, fillers, gluten and sugar." It's the favorite label of newcomers but not those in the know.
    That is because by US law, 2% of ingredients do NOT have to be disclosed on the label and are welcomed into our bodies by a gleeful band of bad bacteria creating a cause for celebration, feasting  and procreation.
    Few commercial foods are approved for Specific Carbohydrate Diet and there are even problems with those that are. Ingredients and processing methods of store bought commercial foods are subject to change at any time and without notification.
    Periodically we contact companies requesting a document by regular mail or fax on company letterhead and signed by a living being. Email is not acceptable, neither is telephone validation.
    Does this sound reasonable?
    My own experience leads me to believe it is easier to have the Vatican approve a divorce than to squeeze a response  even from certain juice companies whose products have been approved for years, something I attempted  the last week in April 2010.
    Company number one agreed to send the letter. It  hasn't arrived yet.  Company number two looped me from Consumer Support to their nutritionist and I wound up in the legal department with assurance that they would get back to me (something like, "The check is in the mail?"). No word.
    These two products were chosen because of their wide availability in North America and even in a few other countries.
    What do I do? I have a very effective juicer! The fruit goes in with no additives and out comes juice with no additives, just as it should be. (we always dilute juice as in pure form it has too much natural sugar).
    It's my two percent solution.



  • Popular Now

×
×
  • Create New...