Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


Celiac.com Sponsor (A1):


  • Join Our Community!

    Get help in our celiac / gluten-free forum.

  • Jefferson Adams

    Can Going Gluten-free Protect You From Brain Disease?

    Jefferson Adams
    0
    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.   eNewsletter: Get our eNewsletter

    Caption: Photo: CC--IntelFreePress

    Celiac.com 03/20/2014 - No one wants a brain disease, and some recent books on the effects of gluten-free diets are suggesting that a gluten-free diet might actually protect you from brain diseases.

    One such book is Grain Brain: The Surprising Truth About Wheat, Carbs, and Sugar — Your Brain's Silent Killers, by David Perlmutter, M.D., a practicing neurologist.



    Celiac.com Sponsor (A12):




    Photo: CC--IntelFreePressSymptoms of celiac disease are known to include intestinal difficulties associated with an adverse immunological response triggered by gluten. This response, which leads to inflammation in the gut, can happen elsewhere in the body too.

    According to Perlmutter, inflammation is at the root of many diseases and complications, including, brain decay.

    According to Perlmutter, gluten can lead to inflammation in the brain, which he believes leads to conditions like dementia and Alzheimer's.

    Perlmutter says that gluten, by triggering the immune system, causes inflammation in the brain, which promotes the brain's glycation by circulating blood sugar. Gram for gram, wheat raises blood sugar levels more than sugar itself.

    Perlmutter encourages strong dietary changes that have drawn some criticism. Specifically, he has recommended an intake of 60 or fewer grams of carbohydrate per day.

    Some point out potential negative health consequences of a high-fat, low-carb diet, both in healthy people and for those with specific conditions, like adrenal or thyroid issues.

    However, Perlmutter's take on brain glycation, in which gluten triggers an immune response in certain people, contributing to inflammation, and to inflammatory disease, such as diabetes and Alzheimer's, may have some foundation. 

    Perlmutter is a reputable neurologist, so his opinion and insight go beyond anecdotal evidence and speculation. It will be interesting to see how much of his perspective is borne out by science. Meantime, Perlmutter certainly makes for interesting, thought-provoking reading.

    What's your experience? Has going gluten-free made an impact on your brain function and awareness?

    Read more at: Celiac.com and at Medical Express.com.

    0

    User Feedback

    Recommended Comments

    Dr. Perlmutter is right on. I not only work in Neurology, I was sick for 40 years, no one knew it was gluten, they diagnosed me with everything but, ever since I stopped eating gluten 8 years ago, I have never been sick since. They are now discovering what we were taught in the past is incorrect, no one believes it or wants to change, too bad, you lose! If you want to stay healthy, stay away from sugar, carbs and gluten, it makes perfect sense! Try it for 2 weeks and see if you don't feel better.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites

    I was sick for 25 years plus. In the end I diagnosed myself with a gluten related disorder. A year and a half later, after miraculous health improvements my doctors finally decided they agreed with me!

     

    The biggest change to my health has been the improvement in my brain function. I actually feel like my IQ has gone up 20 or 30 points! I can think clearly and I'm alert and healthy all day every day. I'm rarely tired. I feel beter than I did when I was 21. I'm now 51. I have been a long hard dtruggle to get it right, but it was so worth it as I now have my life back.

    Share this comment


    Link to comment
    Share on other sites


    Join the conversation

    You are posting as a guest. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.
    Note: Your post will require moderator approval before it will be visible.

    Guest
    Add a comment...

    ×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

      Only 75 emoji are allowed.

    ×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

    ×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

    ×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


  • Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):
    Celiac.com Sponsor (A17):





    Celiac.com Sponsors (A17):




  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 11/27/2002 - According to recommendations made at the 127th Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Neurological Association (ANA), a diagnosis of celiac neuropathy should be considered in patients with neuropathy of otherwise unknown etiology, including in patients without any gastrointestinal symptoms. Dr. Russell L. Chin and colleagues from the Columbia University...

    Scott Adams
    Pediatrics 2004;113:1672-1676.
    Celiac.com 07/12/2004 – According to Dr. Nathaniel Zelnik and colleagues from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, in Haifa, Israel, the spectrum of neurological disorders among those with celiac disease are greater than previously thought. The researchers studied 111 responses to questionnaires that probed for the presence of neurological ...

    Scott Adams
    Dig Liver Dis. 2004 Aug;36(8):513-8.
    Celiac.com 12/11/2004 - An Italian study was carried out to determine the incidence of brain perfusion abnormalities in those with celiac disease, and whether gluten intake and associated autoimmune diseases may be considered risk factors in causing cerebral impairment. The researchers used brain single-photon emission computed tomography...

    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 03/09/2010 - Celiac disease is a vastly growing epidemic. Those suffering from celiac  have varying levels of difficulty digesting wheat, rye and barley; as celiac  primarily affects the small bowel and is considered to be an autoimmune intestinal disorder. However, compounding  new evidence sited in the March 2010 edition of the The Lancet Neurology, suggests that ce...

  • Forum Discussions

    We just recently have been told that our daughter Thalia most likely has Celiac Disease.  It has not been an easy diagnosis for her because she has a chromosomal syndrome that affects the blood tests.  So, we have been instructed to put her ...
    Hey Posterboy! This is certainly interesting!  Are you donating blood on a schedule to reduce your ferritin?  My levels have been bouncing, so my doc is tentatively thinking it’s due to systemic inflammation. The verdict is in with my ...
    NNowak et Al, I think I might of found out why I have been having issues with iron overload IE hemachromatosis. I had caught up on this nutrient (or I thought) I had once so I wouldn't need to again....but I finding that is apparently...