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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Can Sourdough Fermentation Speed Intestinal Recovery in Celiac Patients at Start of Gluten-free Diet?

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 04/19/2012 - A team of researchers examined the effect of corn, rice and amaranth gluten-free sourdoughs on the release of nitric oxide (NO) and synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines by duodenal mucosa biopsies of eight celiac disease patients.

    Image: Sourdough starter: CC--andersbknudsenThe research team included Maria Calasso, Olimpia Vincentini, Francesco Valitutti, Cristina Felli, Marco Gobbetti and Raffaella Di Cagno.

    The team used select lactic acid bacteria as starters for making corn, rice and amaranth sourdoughs. From these gluten-free sourdough matrices, they made chemically acidified doughs, without bacterial starters, and doughs started with baker’s yeast alone.

    They produced pepsin-trypsin (PT) digests from all sourdoughs and doughs, and used the results to the measure the recovery of biopsy specimens from eight celiac disease patients at diagnosis. They also measured the release of NO and the synthesis of pro-inflammatory cytokines interferon-γ (IFN-γ).

    They found that lactic acid bacteria acidified and grew well (ca. log 9.0 CFU/g) during fermentation, showing strong proteolysis on all gluten-free samples.

    They also found that duodenal biopsy specimens still released NO and IFN-γ when subjected to treatments with basal medium (control), PT-digest from chemically acidified doughs and PT-digest from doughs fermented with baker’s yeast alone.

    In fact, in every case, biopsy specimens treated with PT-digests from all gluten-free matrices with sourdough fermentation substantially reduced NO release and IFN-γ synthesis.

    From their results, the team concludes that sourdough fermentation might offer an easy and effective way to speed recovery from intestinal inflammation of celiac patients beginning a gluten-free diet.

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    Can you really trust the 'gluten free' label on a product? From what I understand these things are not that heavily regulated, especially with foods produce outside of the country. I've picked up quite a few products only to later find traces of gluten.

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    I found this article very interesting. As a newly diagnosed celiac disease patient I'm having a difficult time not only adapting to the diet, but also affording the gluten free groceries.

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    Good article, but there are no recipes for the sourdough mix and I agree with Kim. As a senior on a fixed income I find the price of gluten-free food atrocious.

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    I've been over 6 months gluten-free and usually notice within a few minutes when I slip and eat the wrong thing. But I reintroduced regular sourdough bread (Scholtzky's) and had zero ill effects. No reaction whatsoever. So I ate another one the next day. Still no effects--no heartburn, no painful joints, no bad stomach, no effects at all. Can't believe it.

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    I am new to the gluten-free world. Missing my pizza, and bread!! I had some sourdough bread here for company and I said forget it...I am going to have a large slice with butter. Yummy! I had no ill effect at all. I love it--sour dough is my new best friend.

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    I am new to the gluten-free world. Missing my pizza, and bread!! I had some sourdough bread here for company and I said forget it...I am going to have a large slice with butter. Yummy! I had no ill effect at all. I love it--sour dough is my new best friend.

    If you are a celiac or gluten intolerant we highly advise that you don't eat any wheat-based breads. In this study corn, rice and amaranth sourdoughs were used, so they were gluten-free.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.

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