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  • Jefferson Adams
    Jefferson Adams

    Celebrity News: Lady Gaga Gives Up the Gluten

    Reviewed and edited by a celiac disease expert.

    Celiac.com 09/14/2012 - In other news, Lady Gaga is once again making waves in the gluten-free world with word that she is, in fact, adopting a gluten-free diet as she begins the next leg of her 'Born This Way Ball' tour in Sofia, Bulgaria.

    Word is that Gaga is going gluten-free as she seeks to drop ten pounds over the next month to make sure she is in the best shape for the grueling workout demanded by her tour.



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    The 26-year-old singer is said to be keeping her carbohydrate intake to just two portions a week, choosing a diet mainly of fish, chicken and vegetables.

    A source close to reports that Gaga begun a major body make-over, which includes cut out all gluten and wheat from her diet. As a result she has given her people strict instruction to advise staff at venues and restaurants about her new diet because she is taking it very seriously.

    The source added: 'She allows herself one potato or rice portion a week and has been snacking on Ginnybake cakes from wholefood shops - they are gluten free cookies.'

    Despite claims to the contrary, there is no good evidence that a gluten-free diet causes weight loss; though there is good evidence that a gluten-free diet is good for people with celiac disease.

    In fact, for people without celiac disease, scientific evidence pretty much debunks the claim that a gluten-free diet helps regular folks lose weight.

    So, while celebrities, like Lady Gaga, may bring publicity to the gluten-free arena, it is unlikely that the more fad aspects of the gluten-free diet will have great benefits to people who do not have celiac disease, or gluten-intolerance.

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    There is good evidence, however, that a low carb diet produces weight loss compared to other diets that don't work. It's called the paleo diet which is essentially meats/fish/fowl and vegetables. Avoids all carbs except for small amount of starchy vegetables. Even rice is avoided on this diet.

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    I sure do appreciate the challenging of the fad aspects of going gluten-free. One problem I have is gluten ataxia; it is serious and can be very life-threatening. I have to follow the diet 100 percent carefully and it is hard. Hard not only in that I have to be meticulously careful. But hard also in that I get a lot of flack because of it. Lady Gaga in my view is just making it harder, like Scott says.

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    I want to apologize for thanking Scott instead of Jefferson in my earlier post. It was not quite 4AM and to be honest my brain wasn't functioning to well. I sure do appreciate the challening of fad use of gluten free diet. Maybe then I wouldn't have had to wait 25 years to get diagnosed with celiac disease and the gluten ataxia and all that has gone along with it--like epilepsy. Thanks again, Jefferson.

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    It is very aggravating when there is publicity for a notorious star on a gluten-free diet without good reason. I think it trivializes the serious medical problem of celiac disease.

     

    This needs to be recognized as the dangerous condition it is and the diet needs to be followed for life. This is NOT A FAD DIET!

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams

    Jefferson Adams is Celiac.com's senior writer and Digital Content Director. He earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,500 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in science, scientific methodology, biology, anatomy, medicine, logic, and advanced research. He previously served as SF Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and devised health and medical content for Sharecare.com. Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book "Cereal Killers" by Scott Adams and Ron Hoggan, Ed.D.


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    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
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