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    Are People with Celiac Disease More Likely to Have Cognitive Impairment At Diagnosis?


    Jefferson Adams
    • Are middle-aged adults with celiac disease more likely to suffer cognitive impairment at diagnosis? A new study looks into that question.

    Are People with Celiac Disease More Likely to Have Cognitive Impairment At Diagnosis?
    Image Caption: Image: CC--Carolyn Speranza

    Celiac.com 04/23/2018 - A team of researchers recently set out to learn whether celiac disease patients commonly suffer cognitive impairment at the time they are diagnosed, and to compare their cognitive performance with non-celiac subjects with similar chronic symptoms and to a group of healthy control subjects.

    The research team included G Longarini, P Richly, MP Temprano, AF Costa, H Vázquez, ML Moreno, S Niveloni, P López, E Smecuol, R Mazure, A González, E Mauriño, and JC Bai. They are variously associated with the Small Bowel Section, Department of Medicine, Dr. C. Bonorino Udaondo Gastroenterology Hospital; Neurocience Cognitive and Traslational Institute (INECO), Favaloro Fundation, CONICET, Buenos Aires; the Brain Health Center (CESAL), Quilmes, Argentina; the Research Council, MSAL, CABA; and with the Research Institute, School of Medicine, Universidad del Salvador.

    The team enrolled fifty adults with symptoms and indications of celiac disease in a prospective cohort without regard to the final diagnosis.  At baseline, all individuals underwent cognitive functional and psychological evaluation. The team then compared celiac disease patients with subjects without celiac disease, and with healthy controls matched by sex, age, and education.

    Celiac disease patients had similar cognitive performance and anxiety, but no significant differences in depression scores compared with disease controls.

    A total of thirty-three subjects were diagnosed with celiac disease. Compared with the 26 healthy control subjects, the 17 celiac disease subjects, and the 17 disease control subjects, who mostly had irritable bowel syndrome, showed impaired cognitive performance (P=0.02 and P=0.04, respectively), functional impairment (P<0.01), and higher depression (P<0.01). 

    From their data, the team noted that any abnormal cognitive functions they saw in adults with newly diagnosed celiac disease did not seem not to be a result of the disease itself. 

    Their results indicate that cognitive dysfunction in celiac patients could be related to long-term symptoms from chronic disease, in general.

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    I have had blurry vision for 6 weeks low blood sugar symptoms and stomach problems.I am wondering if i have some kind of wheat intolerance.

    Could you advise me on this please?

     

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    1 hour ago, Jasper28 said:

    I have had blurry vision for 6 weeks low blood sugar symptoms and stomach problems.I am wondering if i have some kind of wheat intolerance.

    Could you advise me on this please?

     

    If you suspect Celiac you need to go to your doctor and ask for the blood test. You can read up on it here
    https://celiac.org/celiac-disease/understanding-celiac-disease-2/diagnosing-celiac-disease/screening/
    Feel free to come by and ask if you need help interpreting the lab results or any other questions. If you suspect a intolerance, then AFTER confirming it is not celiac and ALL TESTING is done you can trial the gluten free diet. Elimination diet is about the only way to confirm a intolerance. But you have to be eating it daily to figure out if celiac.

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  • About Me

    Jefferson Adams earned his B.A. and M.F.A. at Arizona State University, and has authored more than 2,000 articles on celiac disease. His coursework includes studies in biology, anatomy, medicine, and science. He previously served as Health News Examiner for Examiner.com, and provided health and medical content for Sharecare.com.

    Jefferson has spoken about celiac disease to the media, including an appearance on the KQED radio show Forum, and is the editor of the book Dangerous Grains by James Braly, MD and Ron Hoggan, MA.

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    Jefferson Adams
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