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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    Celiac.com 06/25/2003 - The Neuropathy Association -- On May 27, 2003 a link between Peripheral Neuropathy and Celiac Disease was reported by physicians at the Weill Medical College of Cornell University and New York Presbyterian Hospital, according to The Neuropathy Association. Peripheral Neuropathy, which affects up to 20 million people in the U.S., can cause pain, numbness and weakness in the arms and legs and, when left untreated, can progress to debilitation.
    In an article published in todays Neurology, five percent of all patients with neuropathy were found to also have celiac disease, which results from an allergy to gluten in bread and other wheat products, and is estimated to affect one out of every 150 people. Based on the diagnosis, we are now able to treat a substantial number of patients with neuropathy who previously could not be helped, said Dr. Russell Chin, the first author of the paper.
    In addition, patients with celiac disease tended to have a type of neuropathy called small fiber neuropathy which often causes severe burning, stinging, and electric-shock like pains, but is often misdiagnosed as it is undetectable with routine tests used by neurologists to diagnose neuropathy. Approximately 16% of all patients with small fiber neuropathy were found to have celiac disease. Many of our patients were told that there was nothing physically wrong with them, and were advised to seek psychiatric care for presumed anxiety or depression, noted Dr. Norman Latov, Medical and Scientific Director of The Neuropathy Association, and senior author of the study. You too would be anxious and depressed if you were in constant pain, and no-one believed you or offered to help.
    Celiac disease is known to run in families, and in several of the cases, other family members were affected. Some were erroneously diagnosed with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, an inherited form of neuropathy due to genetic mutations. Not all familial cases of neuropathy are due to Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, noted Dr. Latov. Peripheral neuropathy can also occur in association with other causes for neuropathy that run in families, such as diabetes or autoimmunity, for example.
    The article also notes that one third of the celiac neuropathy patients did not have any gastrointestinal symptoms such as malabsorption, abdominal pain or diarrhea, which are associated with celiac disease. What many people dont realize, notes Dr. Peter Green, Director of the Celiac Disease Center at the New York Presbyterian Hospital, and co-author of the paper, Is that 50% of adults with celiac disease have few or no gastrointestinal symptoms, and present with other manifestations such as anemia, or as in this case, peripheral neuropathy. Treatment consists of eliminating gluten or wheat containing foods in the diet.
    At present, patients with neuropathy are not routinely tested for celiac disease. Based on the new study, however, patients and physicians should be aware that anyone with unexplained neuropathy or pain should be tested for celiac disease regardless of whether or not they have the classic gastrointestinal symptoms.
    About The Neuropathy Association:
    The Neuropathy Association is a public, non-profit, charitable organization, founded by patients with neuropathy and their friends and families, whose mission is to provide support and education, and fund research into the causes and treatments of neuropathy. It is a rapidly growing, broad based organization, with over 70,000 members, and over 200 support groups and chapters throughout the US. For more information about peripheral neuropathy and The Neuropathy Association, visit our web site at http://www.neuropathy.org, or contact us at 60 E. 42nd St, Suite 942, New York, N.Y. 10165, Tel: 212-692-0662, e-mail: info@neuropathy.org.
    Contact information:
    Media Contact: Jeanne Abi-Nader
    Tel: 212-484-7954
    E-mail: jabi-nader@rlmnet.com
    Norman Latov, M.D., Ph.D., Professor of Neurology and
    Neuroscience, Weill Medical College of Cornell
    University, and Medical and Scientific Director, The
    Neuropathy Association.
    Tel: 212-888-8516
    E-mail: nol2002@med.cornell.edu.
     

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/13/2009 - In the latest issue of the journal Medical Hypotheses, Dr. Rodney Philip Kinvig Ford of the Children’s Gastroenterology and Allergy Clinic in Christchurch, New Zealand, offers up a compelling hypothesis regarding celiac disease and gluten sensitivity, which asserts that the broad array of associated symptoms are more fully explained using a neurological perspective, than using a digestive/nutritional perspective.
    For Dr. Ford, the idea that celiac disease is exclusively an auto-immune condition, and that nutritional mal-absorption is the main cause of related problems, is simply not borne out by the body of clinical data.
    Dr. Ford accepts that celiac disease may itself be largely an auto-immune disorder. However, he believes that the broad array of problems associated with gluten intolerance are best explained by looking at the neurological aspects of intolerance to gluten, indeed, treating it as a neurological condition.
    That's because gluten intolerance can affect up to up to 10% of the population, and that intolerance to gluten has largely neurological manifestations. That is, up to 10% of the population tests positive for elevated antibodies for gluten, even with no bowel damage.
    Under Dr. Ford's hypothesis, neurological causes, rather than gut damage and nutritional deficiency, best explain
    the myriad symptoms experienced by sufferers of celiac disease and gluten-sensitivity.
    Under Dr. Ford hypothesis, if gluten is the assumed cause of harm, then exposure to gluten in sensitive individuals may cause neurological harm through a combination of cross-reacting antibodies, immune complex disease and direct toxicity.
    It's certainly true that a number of celiac patients experience neurological symptoms, often associated with autonomic nervous system malfunction.
    Such neurological symptoms can even show up in celiac patients who are otherwise well nourished. Moreover, gluten-sensitivity can be associated with neurological symptoms in patients who have no mucosal gut damage--that is, patients who are clinically free of celiac disease.
    Dr. Ford argues that gluten exposure can cause neurological harm through a combination of cross-reacting antibodies, immune complex disease and direct toxicity. These nervous system affects include: dis-regulation of the autonomic nervous system, cerebella ataxia, hypotonia, developmental delay, learning disorders, depression, migraine, and headache. He calls such neurologically-driven sensitivity to gluten ‘‘The Gluten Syndrome."
    Hypothesis: Gluten causes symptoms, in both celiac disease and non-celiac gluten-sensitivity, by its adverse actions on the nervous system.
    Many celiac patients experience neurological symptoms, frequently associated with malfunction of the autonomic nervous system. These neurological symptoms can present in celiac patients who are well nourished. The crucial point, however, is that gluten-sensitivity can also be associated with neurological symptoms in patients who do not have any mucosal gut damage (that is, without celiac disease).
    Gluten can cause neurological harm through a combination of cross-reacting antibodies, immune complex disease and direct toxicity. These nervous system affects include: dis-regulation of the autonomic nervous system, cerebella ataxia, hypotonia, developmental delay, learning disorders, depression, migraine, and headache.
    If gluten is the putative harmful agent, then there is no requirement to invoke gut damage and nutritional deficiency to explain the myriad symptoms experienced by sufferers of celiac disease and
    gluten-sensitivity. This he calls: ‘‘The Gluten Syndrome."
    To support his hypothesis, Dr. Ford cites a study of 921 children carried out at his gastroenterology and allergy clinic. All children were screened for celiac disease via IgG-gliadinantibody (InovaDiagnostics) and tissue trans-glutaminase (tTG); and 190 had a small bowel biopsy. Results showed 724 with high IgG-gliadin levels (>14 units): mean age 5.3 years, s.d. 3.8.
    In a key part of the, all children, whatever the biopsy results, were offered a gluten-free diet.
    Results fell into three distinct categories:
    (a) Deï¬nite celiac disease was revealed in 31 patients (4.3%), via histologic diagnosis. 94% of these patients reported improvement on a gluten-free diet.
    ( Possible celiac was revealed in 48 patients (6.6%), who had elevated tTG antibodies, but normal gut histology: 75% of these patients reported improvement on a gluten-free diet.
    © Not-celiacs, n=644 (89.1%), with normal tTG antibodies and no evidence of gut damage: 53% reported improvement gluten-free.
    Note that last category: More than half of people without celiac disease reported improvement on a gluten-free diet. What's up with that? Well, those are the people Dr. Ford suspects suffer from "gluten syndrome."
    The parents of apparently ‘‘asymptomatic” children were interviewed as part of a population study to identify those with celiac disease. They found many children who had positive tests for gliadin antibodies also had irritability, lethargy, abdominal distension, gas, and poor weight gains.  A high proportion of children with gastro-intestinal, allergy, and neurological conditions have elevated IgG-gliadin antibodies.
    The three groups all shared similar clinical features. In the respective groups, 71%, 65%, and 51% of patients reported behavior issues, such as tiredness, lethargy, irritability, sleep disturbance, while 16%, 15%, and 24% reported gastric reflux. Dr. Ford believes these symptoms are likely to be neurologically driven by gluten-sensitivity.
    Celiac patients completed a questionnaire regarding the presence of neurological symptoms. Those reporting any neurological manifestations were compared with a control group: celiac patients had more neurological disorders (51.4%) in comparison with controls (19.9%). These conditions included: hypotonia, developmental delay, learning disorders, attention deï¬cit hyperactivity disorder, migraine, headache, and cerebella ataxia.
    For Dr. Ford, not only is it significant that such high numbers of people with celiac disease report neurological issues, but it is also significant that the majority of 'non-celiac' patients report improvement on a gluten-free diet.
    These patients are likely candidates for what he calls 'gluten syndrome.' These children can likely be spotted via screening for high IgG-gliadin levels.
    Dr. Ford believes the next step is to test this hypothesis in a double-blind study.
    Certainly, the idea that a whole category of non-celiac gluten-sensitivity exists is intriguing, as is the idea that a neurological take on celiac-disease and gluten-sensitivty might might provide a better or improved understanding of those who suffer from these conditions.
    Medical Hypotheses 73 (2009) 438–440


    Destiny Stone
    Celiac.com 03/09/2010 - Celiac disease is a vastly growing epidemic. Those suffering from celiac  have varying levels of difficulty digesting wheat, rye and barley; as celiac  primarily affects the small bowel and is considered to be an autoimmune intestinal disorder. However, compounding  new evidence sited in the March 2010 edition of the The Lancet Neurology, suggests that celiac disease also affects the nervous system, indicating a wider systemic disorder than previously thought.
    Thanks to modern science and years of  testing, many neurological disorders are now being directly associated with gluten intolerance. The most common associations have been demonstrated to be, cerebellar ataxia and peripheral neuropathy. Although gluten has also been shown to impact drug resistant epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, dementia, and stiff-man syndrome among others. To accurately determine the effects gluten has on neurological health, testing by Hadjivassiliou and colleagues was done in three areas: serology, genetics, and clinical response to gluten withdrawal.
    As far as serological tests are concerned, IgG antibodies to gliadin (AGA) have long been considered the most accurate indicators of neurological gluten sensitivity. However, researchers  are now finding that IgG AGA is no longer a relevant test for gluten sensitivity, and it is now being replaced with more dependable tests. In fact, researchers recently became aware of IgG DGP AGA as an  nearly absolute marker for the connection between gluten sensitivity and celiac disease. Initial data also indicates that TG6 are markers for gluten sensitivity, while TG3 appears to be markers for dermatitis herpetiformis. Additionally, IgA antibodies to TG2, if they are detectable in the intestine, have also been shown to effectively connect neurological disease with gluten intolerance.
    Genetics is another important correlation between gluten intolerance and neurological disorders. Clinically speaking, the recognition of  HLA  DQ2 combined with a positive serology, increases the probability that gluten plays a roll in the manifestation of neurological pathogenesis.
    Evaluating gluten withdrawal is crucial when establishing the gluten/neurological abnormalities connection. The link has been clearly noted in patients newly diagnosed with cerebellar ataxia or peripheral neuropathy. After establishing a gluten-free diet, the patients showed considerable improvement of their neurological symptoms. However, patients that had neurological symptoms lasting longer than 12 months, did not typically show signs of neurological improvement once a gluten-free diet was initiated. The reason for this is thought to be a result of irreversible neural cell damage, such as a loss of Purkinje cells accompanied by prominent T-lymphocyte, as seen in patients with ataxia.
    While the findings of these studies  indicated that gluten is a major factor associated with neurological disorders, further studies are needed to show conclusive evidence of the direct correlation between the two. Such findings may provide the key to determining if autoimmunity is fundamental in evoking gluten-sensitive neurological impairment.
    Source:

    The Lancet Neurology,  Volume 9, Issue 3, Pages 233 - 235, March 2010

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/01/2015 - Earlier research on celiac disease and neuropathy has been hampered by the use of inpatient data, low study power, and lack of information on neuropathic characteristics.
    A team of researchers recently set out to accurately assess both relative and absolute risk of developing neuropathy in a nationwide population-based sample of patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease. The research team included Sujata P. Thawani, MD, MPH; Thomas H. Brannagan III, MD; Benjamin Lebwohl, MD, MS; Peter H. R. Green, MD; and Jonas F. Ludvigsson, MD, PhD.
    They are variously affiliated with the Peripheral Neuropathy Center at the Neurological Institute of Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, the Celiac Disease Center in the Department of Medicine at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons in New York, New York, with the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, and with the Department of Pediatrics, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    For their study, the team collected data on small-intestinal biopsies conducted at Sweden’s 28 pathology departments from 1969 to 2008. They compared the risk of neuropathy in a total of 28 ,232 celiac disease patients, all with villous atrophy, Marsh 3, against results from 139, 473 age- and sex-matched non-celiac control subjects.
    They used Cox proportional hazards regression to estimate hazard ratios (HRs), and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), for neuropathy as defined by relevant International Classification of Diseases codes in the Swedish National Patient Register; including both inpatient and outpatient data.
    They found that patients with biopsy-verified celiac disease faced a 2.5 times higher risk of developing neuropathy (95% CI, 2.1-3.0; P < .001). Celiac patients also had an increased risk of developing chronic inflammatory demyelinating neuropathy (2.8; 1.6-5.1; P = .001), autonomic neuropathy (4.2; 1.4-12.3; P = .009), and mononeuritis multiplex (7.6; 1.8-32.4; P = .006).
    However, the team found no association between celiac disease and acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (0.8; 0.3-2.1; P = .68).
    The team found a significantly increased risk of neuropathy in patients with celiac disease, and they are recommending that doctors screen patients with neuropathy for celiac disease.
    Source:
    JAMA Neurol. Published online May 11, 2015. doi:10.1001/jamaneurol.2015.0475

  • Recent Articles

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/21/2018 - Would you buy a house advertised as ‘gluten-free’? Yes, there really is such a house for sale. 
    It seems a Phoenix realtor Mike D’Elena is hoping that his trendy claim will catch the eye of a buyer hungry to avoid gluten, or, at least one with a sense of humor. D’Elena said he crafted the ads as a way to “be funny and to draw attention.” The idea, D’Elena said, is to “make it memorable.” 
    Though D’Elena’s marketing seeks to capitalizes on the gluten-free trend, he knows Celiac disease is a serious health issue for some people. “[W]e’re not here to offend anybody….this is just something we're just trying to do to draw attention and do what's best for our clients," he said. 
    Still, the signs seem to be working. D'elena had fielded six offers within a few days of listing the west Phoenix home.
    "Buying can sometimes be the most stressful thing you do in your entire life so why not have some fun with it," he said. 
    What do you think? Clever? Funny?
    Read more at Arizonafamily.com.

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    Bakery On Main started in the small bakery of a natural foods market on Main Street in Glastonbury, Connecticut. Founder Michael Smulders listened when his customers with Celiac Disease would mention the lack of good tasting, gluten-free options available to them. Upon learning this, he believed that nobody should have to suffer due to any kind of food allergy or dietary need. From then on, his mission became creating delicious and fearlessly unique gluten-free products that were clean and great tasting, while still being safe for his Celiac customers!
    Premium ingredients, bakeshop delicious recipes, and happy customers were our inspiration from the beginning— and are still the cornerstones of Bakery On Main today. We are a fiercely ethical company that believes in integrity and feels that happiness and wholesome, great tasting food should be harmonious. We strive for that in everything we bake in our dedicated gluten-free facility that is GFCO Certified and SQF Level 3 Certified. We use only natural, NON-GMO Project Verified ingredients and all of our products are certified Kosher Parve, dairy and casein free, and we have recently introduced certified Organic items as well! 
    Our passion is to bake the very best products while bringing happiness to our customers, each other, and all those we meet!
    We are available during normal business hours at: 1-888-533-8118 EST.
    To learn more about us at: visit our site.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/20/2018 - Currently, the only way to manage celiac disease is to eliminate gluten from the diet. That could be set to change as clinical trials begin in Australia for a new vaccine that aims to switch off the immune response to gluten. 
    The trials are set to begin at Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre. The vaccine is designed to allow people with celiac disease to consume gluten with no adverse effects. A successful vaccine could be the beginning of the end for the gluten-free diet as the only currently viable treatment for celiac disease. That could be a massive breakthrough for people with celiac disease.
    USC’s Clinical Trials Centre Director Lucas Litewka said trial participants would receive an injection of the vaccine twice a week for seven weeks. The trials will be conducted alongside gastroenterologist Dr. James Daveson, who called the vaccine “a very exciting potential new therapy that has been undergoing clinical trials for several years now.”
    Dr. Daveson said the investigational vaccine might potentially restore gluten tolerance to people with celiac disease.The trial is open to adults between the ages of 18 and 70 who have clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and have followed a strict gluten-free diet for at least 12 months. Anyone interested in participating can go to www.joinourtrials.com.
    Read more at the website for Australia’s University of the Sunshine Coast Clinical Trials Centre.

    Source:
    FoodProcessing.com.au

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/19/2018 - Could baking soda help reduce the inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease? Scientists at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University say that a daily dose of baking soda may in fact help reduce inflammation and damage caused by autoimmune diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, and celiac disease.
    Those scientists recently gathered some of the first evidence to show that cheap, over-the-counter antacids can prompt the spleen to promote an anti-inflammatory environment that could be helpful in combating inflammatory disease.
    A type of cell called mesothelial cells line our body cavities, like the digestive tract. They have little fingers, called microvilli, that sense the environment, and warn the organs they cover that there is an invader and an immune response is needed.
    The team’s data shows that when rats or healthy people drink a solution of baking soda, the stomach makes more acid, which causes mesothelial cells on the outside of the spleen to tell the spleen to go easy on the immune response.  "It's most likely a hamburger not a bacterial infection," is basically the message, says Dr. Paul O'Connor, renal physiologist in the MCG Department of Physiology at Augusta University and the study's corresponding author.
    That message, which is transmitted with help from a chemical messenger called acetylcholine, seems to encourage the gut to shift against inflammation, say the scientists.
    In patients who drank water with baking soda for two weeks, immune cells called macrophages, shifted from primarily those that promote inflammation, called M1, to those that reduce it, called M2. "The shift from inflammatory to an anti-inflammatory profile is happening everywhere," O'Connor says. "We saw it in the kidneys, we saw it in the spleen, now we see it in the peripheral blood."
    O'Connor hopes drinking baking soda can one day produce similar results for people with autoimmune disease. "You are not really turning anything off or on, you are just pushing it toward one side by giving an anti-inflammatory stimulus," he says, in this case, away from harmful inflammation. "It's potentially a really safe way to treat inflammatory disease."
    The research was funded by the National Institutes of Health.
    Read more at: Sciencedaily.com

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 06/18/2018 - Celiac disease has been mainly associated with Caucasian populations in Northern Europe, and their descendants in other countries, but new scientific evidence is beginning to challenge that view. Still, the exact global prevalence of celiac disease remains unknown.  To get better data on that issue, a team of researchers recently conducted a comprehensive review and meta-analysis to get a reasonably accurate estimate the global prevalence of celiac disease. 
    The research team included P Singh, A Arora, TA Strand, DA Leffler, C Catassi, PH Green, CP Kelly, V Ahuja, and GK Makharia. They are variously affiliated with the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Lady Hardinge Medical College, New Delhi, India; Innlandet Hospital Trust, Lillehammer, Norway; Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen, Norway; Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts; Gastroenterology Research and Development, Takeda Pharmaceuticals Inc, Cambridge, MA; Department of Pediatrics, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; Department of Medicine, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; USA Celiac Disease Center, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York; and the Department of Gastroenterology and Human Nutrition, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India.
    For their review, the team searched Medline, PubMed, and EMBASE for the keywords ‘celiac disease,’ ‘celiac,’ ‘tissue transglutaminase antibody,’ ‘anti-endomysium antibody,’ ‘endomysial antibody,’ and ‘prevalence’ for studies published from January 1991 through March 2016. 
    The team cross-referenced each article with the words ‘Asia,’ ‘Europe,’ ‘Africa,’ ‘South America,’ ‘North America,’ and ‘Australia.’ They defined celiac diagnosis based on European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition guidelines. The team used 96 articles of 3,843 articles in their final analysis.
    Overall global prevalence of celiac disease was 1.4% in 275,818 individuals, based on positive blood tests for anti-tissue transglutaminase and/or anti-endomysial antibodies. The pooled global prevalence of biopsy-confirmed celiac disease was 0.7% in 138,792 individuals. That means that numerous people with celiac disease potentially remain undiagnosed.
    Rates of celiac disease were 0.4% in South America, 0.5% in Africa and North America, 0.6% in Asia, and 0.8% in Europe and Oceania; the prevalence was 0.6% in female vs 0.4% males. Celiac disease was significantly more common in children than adults.
    This systematic review and meta-analysis showed celiac disease to be reported worldwide. Blood test data shows celiac disease rate of 1.4%, while biopsy data shows 0.7%. The prevalence of celiac disease varies with sex, age, and location. 
    This review demonstrates a need for more comprehensive population-based studies of celiac disease in numerous countries.  The 1.4% rate indicates that there are 91.2 million people worldwide with celiac disease, and 3.9 million are in the U.S.A.
    Source:
    Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2018 Jun;16(6):823-836.e2. doi: 10.1016/j.cgh.2017.06.037.