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      Frequently Asked Questions About Celiac Disease   04/24/2018

      This Celiac.com FAQ on celiac disease will guide you to all of the basic information you will need to know about the disease, its diagnosis, testing methods, a gluten-free diet, etc.   Subscribe to Celiac.com's FREE weekly eNewsletter   What is Celiac Disease and the Gluten-Free Diet? What are the major symptoms of celiac disease? Celiac Disease Symptoms What testing is available for celiac disease?  Celiac Disease Screening Interpretation of Celiac Disease Blood Test Results Can I be tested even though I am eating gluten free? How long must gluten be taken for the serological tests to be meaningful? The Gluten-Free Diet 101 - A Beginner's Guide to Going Gluten-Free Is celiac inherited? Should my children be tested? Ten Facts About Celiac Disease Genetic Testing Is there a link between celiac and other autoimmune diseases? Celiac Disease Research: Associated Diseases and Disorders Is there a list of gluten foods to avoid? Unsafe Gluten-Free Food List (Unsafe Ingredients) Is there a list of gluten free foods? Safe Gluten-Free Food List (Safe Ingredients) Gluten-Free Alcoholic Beverages Distilled Spirits (Grain Alcohols) and Vinegar: Are they Gluten-Free? Where does gluten hide? Additional Things to Beware of to Maintain a 100% Gluten-Free Diet What if my doctor won't listen to me? An Open Letter to Skeptical Health Care Practitioners Gluten-Free recipes: Gluten-Free Recipes
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    ENZYME AND SULFUR OXIDIZATION DEFICIENCIES IN AUTISTIC CHILDREN WITH KNOWN FOOD/CHEMICAL INTOLERANCE


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    The following was taken from AUTISM 95:

    The following was written about a study: to determine whether children with autism and known food/chemical intolerance have a deficiency of phenol-sulphotransferase-P enzyme and/or a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. On the results obtained so far, all 18 children have a low enzyme level, and some have a low capacity to oxidize sulfur compounds. This enzyme metabolizes phenols and amines. Therefore, with a reduced level, these children will be unable to fully metabolize foods and chemicals which contain phenols (and amines)...

    ...The majority of children in this category ... have allergy to or intolerance of many foods/chemicals, the main offenders being wheat, cows milk, and salicylates. Their family histories show asthma, eczema, migraines, hay fever, plus many other allergy-related conditions...Their siblings display learning difficulties, dyslexia, etc.....

    In autism and other disorders we suspect a peptidase deficiency so that proteins are not broken down into individual amino acids and these short, biologically active chains (peptides) exist in appreciable quantities. Even in the normal gut there will be some of these substances but they are not normally a problem. If the gut wall is leaky (celiac disease or lack of sulfur transferase, etc) these compounds will get into the bloodstream. Even then there should be no serious problem unless they enter the blood...

    ...The brain is protected by the blood brain barrier (BBB) which is partly physical and partly chemical in nature. Thus this would keep peptides out unless there are huge quantities circulating.

    So when the intestinal wall is not healthy and the brain is vulnerable, the brain is affected directly. Learning disabilities, behavioral problems, and even extremes such as schizophrenic behavior can result. The three things which happen are:

    • Not Enough Enzymes To Fully Digest Particular Protein Chains
    • A Breachable Intestinal Wall
    • A Vulnerable Brain

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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 05/08/2007 - A recent news release by the American Academy of Neurology claims that results of a recent Iranian study find no link between autism in children and the development of celiac disease. The study was conducted by a team of researchers led by Dr. Samra Vazirian of Tehran University of Medical Sciences.
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    American Academy of Neurology, news release, May 1, 2007.
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    Carol Frilegh
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    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 07/24/2013 - Gastrointestinal symptoms are a common feature in children with autism, drawing attention to a potential association with celiac disease or gluten sensitivity.
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    PLOS Online

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    J Clin Gastroenterol. 2018 Mar 1. doi: 10.1097/MCG.0000000000001018.

    Connie Sarros
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    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    fdfworld.com

    Jefferson Adams
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    Source:
    PLoS One. 2018; 13(3): e0193764. doi: & 10.1371/journal.pone.0193764