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    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

  • Related Articles

    Scott Adams
    JAMA 2002;287:1413-1419.
    Celiac.com 04/12/2002 - According to a report published in the March 20th issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, people with celiac disease are three times more likely to develop non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) than the normal population. Dr. Carlo Catassi and colleagues from the University of Maryland in Baltimore compared the prevalence of celiac disease in 653 NHL patients with more than 5,000 healthy control subjects to determine the NHL-celiac disease occurrence rate. The results indicate that 1% of NHL patients also have celiac disease, in comparison with 0.42% of the healthy controls. Adjustments were made for age and sex, and the final results indicate that the odds ratios for a patient with celiac disease of developing NHL are: 3.1 for all types of NHL, 16.9 for gut NHL, and 19.2 for T-cell NHL. The overall risk, however, for someone with celiac disease developing NHL is only 0.63%.
    The researchers do not feel that their findings support mass screening for celiac disease, but they do feel that selected NHL patients should be screened for celiac disease. We would also like to add that these findings support the screening of people with celiac disease for NHL, which was not directly addressed by the report.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 08/14/2007 - It has long been documented that there is a connection between celiac disease and neoplasm. In fact, in the 1960s, a population-based study reported a 100-fold increase in risk of non-Hodgkins lymphoma in patients with celiac disease.
    It has also been shown that people with celiac disease are at greater risk for developing small bowel adenocarcinoma. Also, studies have shown an increased mortality rate from cancer among celiac patients, and there is mounting, but not conclusive evidence that a gluten-free diet provides a measure of protection against the development of malignancies. Strangely, several studies have documented a lower risk of breast cancer among celiac patients.
    However, to date, very little is known about the associated factors, particularly with regard to the development of gastrointestinal malignancies and their corresponding risk levels. A study recently published in BMC Gastroenterology documents the efforts of a team of Italian doctors to evaluate the risks of developing various types of gastrointestinal neoplasms associated with delayed diagnosis of celiac disease and the resulting consumption of gluten over time.
    The team was made up of doctors Marco Silano; Umberto Volta; Anna Maria Mecchia; Mariarita Dessì; Rita Di Benedetto; and Massimo De Vincenzi. The team studied a group of 1,968 celiac patients from 20 GE referral centers between 01 January 1982 & 31 March 2005.
    Study Shows Higher Rates of Gastrointestinal Malignancy that Increase with Age in Patients with Delayed Diagnosis of Celiac Disease
    According to the results of the study celiac patients have an increased risk of developing cancer which corresponds directly with the age of diagnosis of celiac disease. This increased risk applies to gastro-intestinal malignancies. An accurate screening for tumors should be performed in patients diagnosed with celiac disease in adulthood. On average, the mean age of celiac patients who developed a neoplasm, either sooner or later, was 47.6 +/- 10.2 years, compared with 28.6 =/- 18.2 years in those did not develop neoplasm.
    BMC Gastroenterology 2007, 7:8 (9 March 2007)
    health writer who lives in San Francisco and is a frequent author of articles for Celiac.com.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 01/03/2008 - It’s pretty well documented that HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8 sereotypes are closely associated with celiac disease. Patients who test positive for both sereotypes are at much greater risk for developing celiac disease. Celiac disease is closely associated with the presence of HLA-DQ2 and HLA-DQ8, and has also been tied to variations in the MY09B gene on the 19th chromosome.
    Homozygosity is the condition of having two identical genes, of many possible combinations, on a single chromosome site.  
    HLA-DQ2 homozygosity means that a person has inherited the HLA-DQ2 gene from both parents.
    In addition to having a much higher risk of developing celiac disease in general, people with HLA-DQ2 homozygosity have a much higher risk of developing refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. Refractory celiac disease is a rare type of celiac disease in which a gluten-free diet fails to eliminate symptoms and to reverse celiac-associated damage. Eneteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma is a type of cancer that often develops in people with advanced intestinal damage such as commonly found in celiac patients.
    A team of Dutch doctors recently set out to determine if the presence of the MY09B gene carries an elevated risk of refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma.
    The research team evaluated 62 people who were confirmed to have both refractory celiac disease type II and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma. They also evaluated 421 people with simple celiac disease, along with a control group of 1624 people without celiac disease.
    The team conducted genotyping of MY09B along with molecular HLA-DQ2 typing on all of the patients.
    The tests showed that one nucleotide variation in MY09B was substantially different in the refractory celiac group than in either the simple celiac or the control group.
    The allele in question is known as the rs7259292 T allele, and the results of the tests showed that it occurs far more frequently in patients with refractory celiac and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma than in either the control group or the group with simple celiac disease. In fact, the halpotype that carries the rs7253292 T allele occurs in 11% of the patients with refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma compared with just 2% of the control group and 3% or patients with regular celiac disease.
    Additionally, the results showed that patients who carry the MY09B rs7259292 allele or who showed HLA-DQ2 homozygosity faced similarly high risk levels for refractory celiac disease type II, and enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma compared to patients with simple celiac disease.
    The results did not show any connection or interaction between the MY09B rs7259292 allele and HLA-DQ homozygosity.
    Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology; 2007: 5(12): 1399-1405


    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/09/2009 - An extensive recent survey of the Swedish cancer registry reveals that people with celiac disease face a 5-fold increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but that the risk has decreased by more than 50% over the last 40 years.
    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, and Sweden's Karolinska Institute recently undertook a review of more than 60,000 lymphoma cases diagnosed in Sweden between 1965 and 2004. They matched those cases to individual lymphoma-free controls with similar characteristics.
    Dr. Ying Gao of the NCI and colleagues found 37,869 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 8,323 cases of Hodgkin's lymphoma, 13,842 cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    The researchers also enrolled 236,408 matched controls and 613,961 first-degree relatives. The team used hospital discharge information to identify people with a history of celiac disease.
    The data revealed that people with a hospital discharge diagnosis of celiac disease faced a 5.35-fold increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The data also showed that risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma was mildly elevated, and thst celiac patients showed no elevated risk of developing chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    The data showed that from 1975-1984, patients with celiac disease faced a 13.2-fold greater risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; from 1985-1994, that level fell to a 7.90-fold increased risk, and from 1995-2004 that risk fell again to 3.84-fold increased risk. Siblings of those affected with celiac disease also faced a 2.03-fold greater risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    At present, doctors do not clearly understand the causal link between the two. Earlier studies have indicated that the inflammation common to celiac disease leads drives lymphoma development.
    According to the research team, the study carries two basic messages:
    The first is that earlier detection of celiac disease is helping to lower the risk of developing lymphoma over time, so today, fewer people are detected in the late stages, when the risk of lymphoma is much greater.
    The second message is that people with a family history of celiac disease have a greater chance of developing lymphoma. This family connection was shown to be separate from the personal celiac disease history of the individual.
    Together, these revelations suggest that shared mechanisms might contribute to both celiac disease and lymphoma.
    The full report appears in the medical journal Gastroenterology, January 2009.

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    While traveling out of state,  I managed (once again) to get glutenized (is this a word?) Back home and in crippling migraine pain, I took migraine pills in hopes for relief. It turned out that Advil Migraine pills contain gluten and needless to say, I am now in worse shape. The joint and body pains, headache, neck, shoulders, back, it all hurts. Painful bloating (picture 9 months pregnant), brain fog to a point that my head feels like it's under water. I can't follow the simplest conversat
    Orangesandmelons, I have had those also!  Always on my palms, or on the edges of my palms, or occasionally on the inside of a finger.  Not many times, and not many at one time (often just a single blister), but while they are itchy, they are distinctly different from DH --- for one thing, mine never scab-up, just slowly go away without seeming to break.  But those clear blisters on the palms have not given me even 1% of the grief that I have had from DH, so I usually ignore them and rarely if ev
    Hello All, I have a question (don't I always?) for those with dermatitis herpetiformis who have longtime experience with the gluten-free diet. How can you tell --- or CAN you tell at all --- between having a stray reaction to gluten vs. having a reaction due to having consumed a high (or a relatively high) amount of iodine, which we know does not cause but can aggravate DH?  Are the reactions the same, and do they last a similar length of time? I'm just wondering how one can disti
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