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  • About Me

    In 1994 I was diagnosed with celiac disease, which led me to create Celiac.com in 1995. I created this site for a single purpose: To help as many people as possible with celiac disease get diagnosed so they can begin to live happy, healthy gluten-free lives. Celiac.com was the first site on the Internet dedicated solely to celiac disease. In 1998 I founded The Gluten-Free Mall, Your Special Diet Superstore!, and I am the co-author of the book Cereal Killers, and founder and publisher of Journal of Gluten Sensitivity.

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    Scott Adams
    Gut 2005;54:54-59. Celiac.com 01/20/2005 - A link between untreated celiac disease and a rare enteropathy-type T-cell lymphoma (ETTL) has been well established by several studies. According to Dr. Karin Ekstrom Smedby of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm and colleagues, there is also an increase in the prevalence of other types of lymphomas in those with celiac disease, such as B cell and non-intestinal lymphomas. In their study the researchers reviewed and reclassified 56 cases of malignant lymphomas that occurred in 11,650 hospitalized celiac disease patients in Sweden. The observed numbers of lymphoma subtypes were compared with those expected in the Swedish population. The researchers discovered that a majority of the lymphomas were not intestinal T-cell lymphomas, but were B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). In addition, 44% of the patients with B cell NHL had a history of other autoimmune/inflammatory diseases. As expected, the relative risks for T-cell NHL and primary gastrointestinal lymphomas were markedly increased. According to the researchers: "Most lymphomas complicating coeliac disease are indeed related to the disease and are not of the ETTL-type. There was a remarkable aggregation of autoimmune/inflammatory disorders, female sex, coeliac disease, and B cell lymphoma."

    Scott Adams
    Eur J Gastroenterol Hepatol 2006;18:187-194.
    Celiac.com 04/10/2006 - According to findings by Dutch researchers, celiac disease increases the risk of non-Hodgkin lymphoma—but to a lower level than once believed. Past celiac disease studies have indicated that there is a 30 to 40-fold increased risk of enteropathy-associated T-cell lymphoma, however, Dr. M. Luisa Mearin and colleagues in The Netherlands investigated the frequency of celiac disease in two large European populations—one was a control group and the other was a group of non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients—and found that 1.2% of the non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients had celiac disease compared to 0.5% of the controls. After adjusting for age and sex differences between the two groups they found that celiac disease patients had a 2.6-fold increase risk of getting non-Hodgkin lymphoma, and this increased risk was only associated with patients who had been diagnosed prior to the study, and not in those with “silent” celiac disease which was found during the study. The odds of T-cell type small bowel lymphoma in celiac disease patients was estimated to be 28 times higher than for other localizations.
    The researchers conclude that celiac disease patients have a significantly increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but the association is lower than previously thought. Celiac disease is mainly associated with T-cell small bowel lymphoma which is, in general, a rare condition.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 02/09/2009 - An extensive recent survey of the Swedish cancer registry reveals that people with celiac disease face a 5-fold increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin lymphoma, but that the risk has decreased by more than 50% over the last 40 years.
    Researchers at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) in Bethesda, Maryland, and Sweden's Karolinska Institute recently undertook a review of more than 60,000 lymphoma cases diagnosed in Sweden between 1965 and 2004. They matched those cases to individual lymphoma-free controls with similar characteristics.
    Dr. Ying Gao of the NCI and colleagues found 37,869 cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, 8,323 cases of Hodgkin's lymphoma, 13,842 cases of chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    The researchers also enrolled 236,408 matched controls and 613,961 first-degree relatives. The team used hospital discharge information to identify people with a history of celiac disease.
    The data revealed that people with a hospital discharge diagnosis of celiac disease faced a 5.35-fold increased risk of developing non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The data also showed that risk of Hodgkin's lymphoma was mildly elevated, and thst celiac patients showed no elevated risk of developing chronic lymphocytic leukemia.
    The data showed that from 1975-1984, patients with celiac disease faced a 13.2-fold greater risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma; from 1985-1994, that level fell to a 7.90-fold increased risk, and from 1995-2004 that risk fell again to 3.84-fold increased risk. Siblings of those affected with celiac disease also faced a 2.03-fold greater risk of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.
    At present, doctors do not clearly understand the causal link between the two. Earlier studies have indicated that the inflammation common to celiac disease leads drives lymphoma development.
    According to the research team, the study carries two basic messages:
    The first is that earlier detection of celiac disease is helping to lower the risk of developing lymphoma over time, so today, fewer people are detected in the late stages, when the risk of lymphoma is much greater.
    The second message is that people with a family history of celiac disease have a greater chance of developing lymphoma. This family connection was shown to be separate from the personal celiac disease history of the individual.
    Together, these revelations suggest that shared mechanisms might contribute to both celiac disease and lymphoma.
    The full report appears in the medical journal Gastroenterology, January 2009.

    Jefferson Adams
    Celiac.com 04/13/2010 - A team of clinicians recently described a case of immune modulation by non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a patient with two primary intestinal T-Cell lymphomas and long-standing celiac disease.
    F. Mühr-Wilkenshoff, M. Friedrich, H. D. Foss, M. Hummel, M. Zeitz, and S. Daum made up the research team. They are variously affiliated with the  Medical Clinic I, Gastroenterology, Rheumatology and Infectious Diseases, and with the Department of Pathology, Charité of the Campus Benjamin Franklin of University Medicine Berlin, Germany.
    About 20–30% of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHLs) are gastrointestinal in nature. Of these gastrointestinal lymphomas, about 20–30% occur in small intestine
    The clinical team recently reported the case of a 72-year-old patient who had been diagnosed with celiac disease when he was 52-years old. The man had not followed a gluten-free diet, yet showed no evidence of enteropathy or celiac-associated antibodies, but still developed a jejunal T-cell lymphoma.
    Doctors resected the lymphoma due to perforation and treated the patient with four courses of IMVP-16. The patient began and maintained a strict gluten-free diet.
    Two years later, the patient appeared with weight loss and a clonally divergent refractory sprue type II with loss of antigen (CD8; T-cell receptor-) expression in intraepithelial lymphocytes.
    At this time, he showed high titers of celiac-associated antibodies, although he was on a strict GFD.
    The research team notes that the missing enteropathy under a gluten-containing diet supports the idea of immune suppression in malignant diseases, especially non-Hodgkin lymphoma.
    They also note that the fact that, even while maintaining a strict gluten-free diet, the patient developed refractory sprue type II, an early form of another independent T-cell lymphoma, along with celiac-associated antibodies, suggests that clonal intraepithelial lymphocytes might be stimulating antibody production.
    Thus, they conclude that isolated detection of celiac-associated antibodies in patients with celiac disease does not prove that patients have deviated from their gluten-free diets.
    Source:

    Digestion 2010;81:231–234 DOI: 10.1159/000269810

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    So i recently had a baby and 3 months postpartum I started celery juicing and after juicing my stomach would be in so much pain. So I stopped it for a while and a whole month no pain or issues. I made an apt with a GI doctor to just get my blood work checked everything came back great except the Ema it was 1:20 he said it was strange because all the other Celiac panel test were negative my Ttg and the genetic screening even. So I made an apt with another doctor for second opinion she stated that
    Potatoes are good for breakfast! Your concoction sounds pretty good. K, how about this? Peel & dice potatoes, fry them in just enough olive oil to keep them from sticking in a skillet until they begin getting crispy. Toss in diced sweet peppers or maybe chili peppers, onions to soften. I know you're not doing egg yolks b/c of iodine but you can do the whites. Pour egg white on top until the white is done. If you have a steak or some leftover steak, you can heat that on the side. YUM!
    Hi Mom, I am so sorry you're getting the run around. Yes, the links worked for me too & that poor little thing! Cyclinglady gave you excellent advice. I really can't add anything to it but everything she says is right on. Keep advocating!  Read this: https://www.sjsreview.com/8752/features/sophomore-establishes-celiac-support-group/ I found how you can contact her. GenerationGF.Houston@gluten.org Here's the web page. Scroll down to the TX groups. https://gluten.org/k
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